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The 120-S minute: using analysis of work activity to prevent psychological distress among elementary school teachers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209722
Source
J Occup Health Psychol. 1997 Jan;2(1):45-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1997
Author
K. Messing
A M Seifert
E. Escalona
Author Affiliation
Centre Pour l'Etude des Interactions Biologiques Entre la Santé et l'Environment (CINBIOSE), Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada. messing.karen@uqam.ca
Source
J Occup Health Psychol. 1997 Jan;2(1):45-62
Date
Jan-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Burnout, Professional - prevention & control - psychology
Female
Humans
Internal-External Control
Middle Aged
Quebec
Risk factors
Social Environment
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - complications - prevention & control
Teaching
Time and Motion Studies
Workload - psychology
Abstract
Primary school teachers in Québec suffer psychological distress, as shown by the Québec Health Survey (M. Gervais, 1993; Santè Québec, 1995). The authors applied and extended the French model (F. Guérin, A. Laville, F. Daniellou, J. Duraffourg, & A. Kerguelen, 1991) of analysis of work activity to observing classroom teaching (14 women in 10 classrooms for a total of 48 hr 24 min) to identify stressful elements. The authors observed a rapid sequence of actions, eye fixations of short duration, little physical or mental relaxation, multiple simultaneous activities, and uncomfortable temperature and humidity levels. Teachers use many strategies to teach, to create a learning environment, and to maintain attention in classrooms under adverse conditions. Examination of these strategies led to recommendations to improve relations between the teachers and their supervisors and to make the classroom an easier place to teach.
PubMed ID
9552279 View in PubMed
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Air quality during the winter in Qu├ębec day-care centers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224262
Source
Am J Public Health. 1992 Mar;82(3):432-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1992
Author
S. Daneault
M. Beausoleil
K. Messing
Author Affiliation
Center for the Study of Biological Interactions between Health and Environment, Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada.
Source
Am J Public Health. 1992 Mar;82(3):432-4
Date
Mar-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution, Indoor - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Carbon Dioxide - analysis
Child Day Care Centers
Child, Preschool
Electric Power Supplies
Environmental monitoring
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Heating - methods - standards
Humans
Humidity
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Quebec
Temperature
Time Factors
Ventilation - methods - standards
Abstract
Over 90% of 91 day care centers in greater Montréal, Québec exceeded 1000 ppm of CO2 during January through April 1989. Four variables were independent positive predictors of CO2 levels: the density of children in the center; presence of electric heating; absence of a ventilation system; and building age. High levels of CO2 are associated with respiratory tract and other symptoms. Clear standards and inspection policies should be established for day care center air quality.
Notes
Cites: BMJ. 1989 Dec 2;299(6712):1388-902513974
Cites: J Occup Med. 1987 Jan;29(1):57-623546636
Cites: Scand J Soc Med Suppl. 1985;36:1-393866314
Cites: Environ Res. 1989 Oct;50(1):37-552792060
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1984 Dec 8;289(6458):1573-56439323
Cites: Rev Infect Dis. 1986 Jul-Aug;8(4):514-203529306
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1987 May;79(5):685-7003571762
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1985 Aug 10;291(6492):373-63926199
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1988 Sep;78(9):1175-73407814
PubMed ID
1536362 View in PubMed
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Are women in female jobs for their health? A study of working conditions and health effects in the fish-processing industry in Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242448
Source
Int J Health Serv. 1983;13(4):635-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
1983
Author
K. Messing
J P Reveret
Source
Int J Health Serv. 1983;13(4):635-48
Date
1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environment
Environmental health
Female
Fish Products
Food-Processing Industry
Humans
Male
Noise
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Quebec
Questionnaires
Women
Women, Working
Abstract
A questionnaire concerning environmental conditions, work organization, and health-related symptoms was administered to 209 male and female workers in fish-processing plants in Quebec. Jobs in these factories were "ghettoized," with 88.9 percent of job titles held primarily (more than 75 percent) by members of one sex. In general, significantly more women than men reported that their work sites exposed them to environmental aggressors such as noise and cold. Women also reported significantly more often that their jobs were uninteresting, that they could not move around, and that their work speed was fast. Women reported fatigue, stress, insomnia, digestive problems, and aches and pains significantly more often than did men (analysis controlled for age). When the effects of work speed were examined specifically, it was found that a fast work speed was associated with fatigue, stress, insomnia, and digestive problems in both sexes, and with aches and pains in women. It is suggested that women are required to work at a faster speed than men, and that this is a factor in the greater prevalence of health-related symptoms among women. Our interpretation of these data calls into question the commonly held belief that men and women are assigned to sex-specific jobs in order to protect the health of "the weaker sex."
PubMed ID
6642814 View in PubMed
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Effects of lymphocyte subpopulations on the clonal assay of HPRT mutants: occupational exposure to cytostatic drugs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218327
Source
Mutat Res. 1994 May;321(3):147-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1994
Author
H. Dubeau
W. Zazi
C. Baron
K. Messing
Author Affiliation
CINBIOSE, Département des Sciences Biologiques, Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada.
Source
Mutat Res. 1994 May;321(3):147-57
Date
May-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antineoplastic Agents - adverse effects
Clone Cells
Health Personnel
Humans
Hypoxanthine Phosphoribosyltransferase - genetics
Middle Aged
Mutagenicity Tests
Mutation
Nurses
Occupational Exposure
Pharmacists
Quebec
T-Lymphocyte Subsets - cytology - drug effects - enzymology
Abstract
The mutagenic effect of occupational exposure to antineoplastic agents was studied in chemotherapy nurses and pharmacists using the T-lymphocyte clonal assay. A significant increase in mutant frequency was observed compared to controls. However, in the present study, cloning efficiency without selection (CEU) was significantly reduced in exposed personnel raising the possibility of an overestimation of the calculated MF. Changes in lymphocyte populations and clonal potential of T-cells were also observed following exposure. CEU was related to % CD4 cells but CE with selection (CETG) was not. Differences in clonal ability of T-cells under selective and unselective conditions coupled with differential lethal effect of antineoplastic agents on lymphocyte subsets may result in inaccurate estimation of MF.
PubMed ID
7513065 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of exposure data from men and women with the same job title.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217691
Source
J Occup Med. 1994 Aug;36(8):913-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
Author
K. Messing
L. Dumais
J. Courville
A M Seifert
M. Boucher
Author Affiliation
Centre pour l'étude des interactions biologiques entre la santé et l'environnement (CINBIOSE), Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada.
Source
J Occup Med. 1994 Aug;36(8):913-7
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Job Description
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Selection Bias
Task Performance and Analysis
Women, Working
Abstract
In the epidemiological approach to occupational cancers, large bodies of data must be analyzed to find rare cases of cancer. The exposure status of workers must therefore be assessed. Inaccuracies will lead to bias toward the null value in certain cases. Job title has often been used as a proxy for exposure status. This study was undertaken to examine content (ie, tasks and activities) associated with job title among men and women in a large Québec municipality. Occupational accident reports were studied for 1589 accidents, and 113 men and women workers were interviewed about job content. Women and men did not seem to have the same accident rates. From interview data, it appeared that women and men with the same job title did not perform the same tasks. Thus, they might have different exposures. The data reported here support caution in using job title to estimate exposure for both genders if the job-exposure matrix has not previously been validated separately by gender. In addition, it may be unwise to adjust relationships between job title and cancer incidence for gender, thus treating gender as a confounder when it may be a proxy for specific exposures.
PubMed ID
7807275 View in PubMed
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Hospital trash: cleaners speak of their role in disease prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205394
Source
Med Anthropol Q. 1998 Jun;12(2):168-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
K. Messing
Author Affiliation
Centre pour l'étude des interactions biologiques entre la santé et l'environnement Université du Québec à Montréal.
Source
Med Anthropol Q. 1998 Jun;12(2):168-87
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Hospitals - manpower
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Medical Waste Disposal
Occupational Health
Prejudice
Preventive Medicine
Quebec
Abstract
Feminist researchers have contrasted the caring provided by women in hospitals with a more fragmented "curing" approach, which they identify with the predominantly male professions of medicine and surgery. The author spoke with hospital cleaners about their jobs and their health. Several themes emerged: the invisibility of the cleaning function, lack of respect for cleaners, representations of cleaning as undemanding, and assumptions that women's work in cleaning is particularly easy. Cleaners use various strategies to combat these stereotypes but receive little help from administrators or fellow employees. There is a hierarchy in the status of Québec hospital workers with curing (doctors) at the top, followed by caring and healing (nurses, therapists, and attendants), and hygiene (cleaners, sterilizers, and launderers) at the bottom. Authority hierarchies in health care are not related to gender in a simple way, although there is discrimination against women cleaners. The fact that cleaning, especially cleaning performed by women, is invisible to managers, other hospital personnel, and patients has important consequences for cleaners' and for patients' health.
PubMed ID
9627921 View in PubMed
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HPRT-mutant frequency and lymphocyte characteristics of workers exposed to ionizing radiation on a sporadic basis: a comparison of two exposure indicators, job title and dose.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220486
Source
Mutat Res. 1993 Sep;319(1):61-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1993
Author
A M Seifert
C. Demers
H. Dubeau
K. Messing
Author Affiliation
Centre pour l'Etude des Interactions Biologiques entre la Santé et l'Environment (CINBIOSE), Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada.
Source
Mutat Res. 1993 Sep;319(1):61-70
Date
Sep-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
CD4-CD8 Ratio
Cell Division - radiation effects
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Female
Humans
Hypoxanthine Phosphoribosyltransferase - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Mutagenicity Tests
Mutation
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Occupations
Quebec
Radiation Injuries - diagnosis - enzymology - etiology
Regression Analysis
Smoking - adverse effects
T-Lymphocytes - enzymology - radiation effects
Thermoluminescent Dosimetry
Abstract
Using the clonal HPRT-mutant frequency assay, mutant frequencies of humans have been shown to rise following exposure to large doses of mutagens during radiotherapy, chemotherapy or after an atom bomb explosion. Success in relating mutant frequencies to exposure to high levels of mutagens has encouraged researchers to examine the effects of lower doses, such as those found among workers exposed at their jobs. In order to relate low doses of mutagens to biological effects, accurate characterization of exposure is critical, but most occupational studies are forced to use gross measures of exposure derived from job title or professional judgments as to potential exposure. Mutant frequencies and other relevant lymphocyte characteristics of 58 industrial workers were related to exposure status in two ways. When workers were classed as "exposed" or "unexposed" to ionizing radiation, no difference in any biological variable was seen between the two groups. When dosimeter readings were used as the exposure indicator, significant relationships appeared between dose and mutant frequency and CD4/CD8 lymphocyte subpopulation ratios. Mutant frequency was also positively related to age and smoking status. The time course of exposure and of appearance of mutant cells is discussed and it is suggested that this relationship receive attention in occupational studies of genotoxic effects.
PubMed ID
7690460 View in PubMed
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Indicators for choosing an optimal mix of major working postures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172751
Source
Appl Ergon. 2006 May;37(3):349-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2006
Author
E. Laperrière
S. Ngomo
M-C Thibault
K. Messing
Author Affiliation
CINBIOSE, Université du Québec à Montréal, C.P. 8888, Succursale Centre-ville, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3C 3P8.
Source
Appl Ergon. 2006 May;37(3):349-57
Date
May-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood pressure
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health
Pain threshold
Posture
Quebec
Sex Factors
Abstract
North American workers usually stand while working, and prolonged standing is associated with discomfort and cardiovascular problems. Since prolonged sitting is also associated with health problems, and standing postures differ as to mobility and access to seating, it is desirable to identify an optimal mix of postures. As a step towards this identification, it is desirable to develop indicators of potential health effects that respond to changes in work requirements. We observed 65 subjects who usually stood at work, in four types of workplaces. Pressure-pain threshold (PPT) recorded on the plantar surface was used as an indicator of discomfort and arterial blood pressure was used as an indicator of cardiovascular effects. PPT after work was significantly lower than that before work. Sitting for even a small part of the day appeared to be protective. The effects of static vs. dynamic work on PPT and arterial blood pressure may differ.
PubMed ID
16182229 View in PubMed
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Introduction: research directed to improving women's occupational health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224621
Source
Women Health. 1992;18(3):1-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
K. Messing
Author Affiliation
Center for the Study of Biological Interactions between Health and the Environment, University of Quebec, Montreal.
Source
Women Health. 1992;18(3):1-9
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Female
Health Services Research
Human Engineering
Humans
Mental health
Middle Aged
Occupational Health
Sex
Women's health
Women, Working
Workload
Abstract
This paper reviews briefly recent developments in research on women's occupational health and safety in five areas: documenting the unexpectedly heavy physical and mental workload involved in occupations traditionally assigned to women; showing the consequences for women's health of their precarious relationship to the work force; demonstrating the health effects of the double workday; studying the effects of work on those aspects of biology that are sex-specific; suggesting ways to remove ergonomic barriers to women entering non-traditional jobs which have been designed in relation to the typical male body. Suggestions are made for future research in these areas, in response to the needs of working women. This paper serves as an introduction to the volume of Women and Health dealing with women's occupational health and safety.
PubMed ID
1615686 View in PubMed
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Is genome mapping the way to improve Canadians' health?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228512
Source
Can J Public Health. 1990 Sep-Oct;81(5):397-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Lippman
K. Messing
F. Mayer
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McGill University.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1990 Sep-Oct;81(5):397-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Genetic Diseases, Inborn
Health Policy
Health Priorities
Human Genome Project - economics - organization & administration
Humans
Risk assessment
Notes
Comment In: Can J Public Health. 1991 Sep-Oct;82(5):3571768999
PubMed ID
2123738 View in PubMed
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18 records – page 1 of 2.