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The 2000 Canadian recommendations for the management of hypertension: part two--diagnosis and assessment of people with high blood pressure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192030
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2001 Dec;17(12):1249-63
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
K B Zarnke
M. Levine
F A McAlister
N R Campbell
M G Myers
D W McKay
P. Bolli
G. Honos
M. Lebel
K. Mann
T W Wilson
C. Abbott
S. Tobe
E. Burgess
S. Rabkin
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, London Health Sciences Centre, University of Western Ontario, 339 Windermere Road, London, Ontario N6A 5A5, Canada. Kelly.Zarnke@lhsc.on.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2001 Dec;17(12):1249-63
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Gland Neoplasms - complications
Adult
Blood Pressure Determination - methods - psychology - standards
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory - methods - standards
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Clinical Laboratory Techniques - standards
Diabetes Complications
Diabetic Nephropathies - complications - diagnosis
Echocardiography - standards
Electrocardiography
Evidence-Based Medicine - methods
Humans
Hypertension - complications - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Hypertension, Renovascular - diagnosis
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - complications - ultrasonography
Office Visits
Patient compliance
Pheochromocytoma - complications - diagnosis
Risk factors
Self Care - methods - standards
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and assessment of high blood pressure in adults.
For people with high blood pressure, the assignment of a diagnosis of hypertension depends on the appropriate measurement of blood pressure, the level of the blood pressure elevation, the duration of follow-up and the presence of concomitant vascular risk factors, target organ damage and established atherosclerotic diseases. For people diagnosed with hypertension, defining the overall risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes requires laboratory testing, a search for target organ damage and an assessment of the modifiable causes of hypertension. Out-of-clinic blood pressure assessment and echocardiography are options for selected patients.
People at increased risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes and were identified and quantified.
Medline searches were conducted from the period of the last revision of the Canadian recommendations for the management of hypertension (May 1998 to October 2000). Reference lists were scanned, experts were polled, and the personal files of the subgroup members and authors were used to identify other studies. All relevant articles were reviewed and appraised, using prespecified levels of evidence, by content experts and methodological experts.
A high value was placed on the identification of people at increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.
The identification of people at higher risk of cardiovascular disease will permit counselling for lifestyle manoeuvres and the introduction of antihypertensive drugs to reduce blood pressure for patients with sustained hypertension. In certain settings, and for specific classes of drugs, blood pressure lowering has been associated with reduced cardiovascular morbidity and/or mortality.
The present document contains detailed recommendations pertaining to aspects of the diagnosis and assessment of patients with hypertension, including the accurate measurement of blood pressure, criteria for the diagnosis of hypertension and recommendations for follow-up, routine and optional laboratory testing, assessment for renovascular hypertension, home and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, and the role of echocardiography in hypertension.
All recommendations were graded according to strength of the evidence and voted on by the Canadian Hypertension Recommendations Working Group. Only the recommendations achieving high levels of consensus are reported here. These guidelines will be updated annually.
These recommendations are endorsed by the Canadian Hypertension Society, The Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control, The College of Family Physicians of Canada, The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, The Adult Disease Division and Bureau of Cardio-Respiratory Diseases and Diabetes at the Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control of Health Canada.
PubMed ID
11773936 View in PubMed
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Association of topoisomerases I and II with the chromatin in SV40-infected monkey cells.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4138
Source
Virology. 1991 Mar;181(1):408-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1991
Author
R. Rainwater
K. Mann
Author Affiliation
Biology Department, University of Alaska, Anchorage 99508.
Source
Virology. 1991 Mar;181(1):408-11
Date
Mar-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cell Line
Cell Transformation, Viral
Cercopithecus aethiops
Chromatin - enzymology
DNA Topoisomerases, Type I - isolation & purification - metabolism
DNA Topoisomerases, Type II - isolation & purification - metabolism
Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel
Immunoblotting
Molecular Weight
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Simian virus 40 - enzymology
Subcellular Fractions - enzymology
Abstract
The subcellular localization of topoisomerase I and topoisomerase II has been compared in Simian virus (SV40)-infected and uninfected TC7 monkey cells. In SV40-infected cells, both of these enzymes are preferentially associated with the chromatin. Some topoisomerase I is associated with the nuclear matrix, whereas topoisomerase II shows no such association. In uninfected TC7 cells, topoisomerase I is present in both the chromatin and nuclear matrix fractions. Topoisomerase II, on the other hand, is not detected in any of the subcellular fractions of uninfected cells. After SV40 infection, there is a marked increase in the level of chromatin-associated topoisomerase II.
PubMed ID
1847264 View in PubMed
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[Consequences of AIDS in the lives of hemophiliacs and their caregiving families in Quebec: stress, response to stress and social support].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224761
Source
Sante Ment Que. 1992;17(1):97-110
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
G. Hart
K. Mann
M. Stewart
Source
Sante Ment Que. 1992;17(1):97-110
Date
1992
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - complications - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Caregivers - psychology
Family - psychology
Female
Health services needs and demand
Health Surveys
Hemophilia A - complications - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Abstract
The following article focuses on the Québec portion of a national survey on the care needed by hemophiliacs with AIDS or having contracted the HIV virus. The survey was based on an approach that considers social support as a means to face stress. It also examined the needs of dispensers of care and relatives (whether mourning or not) of these persons. Participants revealed having experienced more stress because of an absence of support or simply negative support, than because of the physical deterioration caused by the disease. In addition, the question of confidentiality was often raised. In general, participants said they were satisfied with the support they had received, especially on the part of members of their family.
PubMed ID
1515537 View in PubMed
Less detail

Differential increase in topoisomerase II in simian virus 40-infected cells.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4154
Source
J Virol. 1990 Feb;64(2):918-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1990
Author
R. Rainwater
K. Mann
Author Affiliation
Biology Department, University of Alaska, Anchorage 99508.
Source
J Virol. 1990 Feb;64(2):918-21
Date
Feb-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antigens, Polyomavirus Transforming - genetics
Cell Line
Cell Transformation, Viral
DNA Replication
DNA Topoisomerases, Type I - biosynthesis
DNA Topoisomerases, Type II - biosynthesis
DNA, Viral - biosynthesis
Kinetics
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Simian virus 40 - enzymology - genetics - immunology
Abstract
The time course of expression of topoisomerase I, topoisomerase II, and simian virus 40 (SV40) large tumor (T) antigen was determined in whole-cell extracts of uninfected versus SV40-infected TC7 cells. After a minor increase, the level of topoisomerase I remained fairly constant throughout the time course in both uninfected and SV40-infected cells. In contrast, the level of topoisomerase II increased markedly in SV40-infected cells but not in uninfected cells following the appearance of SV40 T antigen.
PubMed ID
2153253 View in PubMed
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Improved drug delivery to cancer cells: a method using magnetoliposomes that target epidermal growth factor receptors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3888
Source
Med Hypotheses. 2005;64(3):468-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
M. Kullberg
K. Mann
J L Owens
Author Affiliation
Biomedical Program and Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alaska, 3211 Providence Drive, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA. AFMPK@uaa.alaska.edu
Source
Med Hypotheses. 2005;64(3):468-70
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Drug Delivery Systems
Liposomes
Magnetics - therapeutic use
Neoplasms - drug therapy
Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor - drug effects - metabolism
Toxins, Biological - therapeutic use
Abstract
The toxin delivery system described herein would allow for the selective killing of tumor cells overexpressing the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Tumor cells often overexpress EGFR, because it allows the cells to divide more quickly. Past delivery systems targeting this receptor have been ineffective due to a lack of specificity that results in harm to surrounding tissue and damage to organs such as the liver. The technique presented here is different, because it presents the possibility of delivering toxin only to the tumor area and almost exclusively to the tumor cells. Delivery is localized to the tumor tissue through the use of EGF conjugated magnetoliposomes. These are liposomes that have magnets imbedded in their bilayer, allowing for selective heating and release of a drug when the magnetoliposome is under an oscillating magnetic field. To create an additional level of specificity, the delivery system will consist of two EGF-bound components that must interact within the endosome of a cell for the toxin to be released. If a tumor cell overexpresses EGFR by 5-fold, then each of its endosomes will have 5 times more receptors than those of a normal cell. Therefore, the tumor cell's endosome has a 5 times greater chance of containing one EGF-bound component and a 25 times greater chance of containing both components. Since both components are necessary for toxin release, the tumor cells will receive 25 times more toxin than the normal cells. Theoretically, it is possible to produce a three or four component system that would deliver 125 or 625 times more toxin to the tumor cells.
PubMed ID
15617850 View in PubMed
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O Ke Aloha Ka Mea I Ho'ola 'Ai--Compassion Is the Healer: an indigenous peoples healing conference. October 2000, Hawai'i.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189002
Source
Pac Health Dialog. 2001 Sep;8(2):417-22
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Sep-2001
Author
K. Hewett
C. Alailima
K. Kamakea-Ohelo
K. Mann
Author Affiliation
Waimanalo Health Center, Hawai'i 96795, USA.
Source
Pac Health Dialog. 2001 Sep;8(2):417-22
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Aged
Cultural Characteristics
Empathy
Ethnic Groups - psychology
Hawaii
Humans
Medicine, Traditional
Spiritual Therapies
PubMed ID
12180524 View in PubMed
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Role of cysteine residues in regulation of p53 function.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4080
Source
Mol Cell Biol. 1995 Jul;15(7):3892-903
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1995
Author
R. Rainwater
D. Parks
M E Anderson
P. Tegtmeyer
K. Mann
Author Affiliation
Biology Department, University of Alaska, Anchorage 99508, USA.
Source
Mol Cell Biol. 1995 Jul;15(7):3892-903
Date
Jul-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenovirus E1A Proteins - metabolism
Alkylation
Animals
Base Sequence
Cell Transformation, Neoplastic
Cysteine
DNA Mutational Analysis
Mice
Molecular Sequence Data
Oxidation-Reduction
Protein Binding
Protein Conformation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Structure-Activity Relationship
Sulfhydryl Compounds - metabolism
Suppression, Genetic
Trans-Activation (Genetics)
Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 - chemistry - genetics - metabolism
Zinc - metabolism
ras Proteins - metabolism
Abstract
Previous studies of p53 have implicated cysteine residues in site-specific DNA binding via zinc coordination and redox regulation (P. Hainaut and J. Milner, Cancer Res. 53:4469-4473, 1993; T. R. Hupp, D. W. Meek, C. A. Midgley, and D. P. Lane, Nucleic Acids Res. 21:3167-3174, 1993). We show here that zinc binding and redox regulation are, at least in part, distinct determinants of the binding of p53 to DNA. Moreover, by substituting serine for each cysteine in murine p53, we have investigated the roles of individual cysteines in the regulation of p53 function. Substitution of serine for cysteine at position 40, 179, 274, 293, or 308 had little or no effect on p53 function. In contrast, replacement of cysteine at position 173, 235, or 239 markedly reduced in vitro DNA binding, completely blocked transcriptional activation, and led to a striking enhancement rather than a suppression of transformation by p53. These three cysteines have been implicated in zinc binding by X-ray diffraction studies (Y. Cho, S. Gorina, P.D. Jeffrey, and N.P. Pavletich, Science 265:346-355, 1994); our studies demonstrate the functional consequences of the inability of the central DNA-binding domain of p53 to studies demonstrate the functional consequences of the inability of the central DNA-binding domain of p53 to bind zinc. Lastly, substitutions for cysteines at position 121, 132, 138, or 272 partially blocked both transactivation and the suppression of transformation by p53. These four cysteines are located in the loop-sheet-helix region of the site-specific DNA-binding domain of p53. Like the cysteines in the zinc-binding region, therefore, these cysteines may cooperate to modulate the structure of the DNA-binding domain. Our findings argue that p53 is subject to more than one level of conformational modulation through oxidation-reduction of cysteines at or near the p53-DNA interface.
PubMed ID
7791795 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.