Skip header and navigation

Refine By

   MORE

8 records – page 1 of 1.

An epidemic of furniture-related dermatitis: searching for a cause.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148252
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2010 Jan;162(1):108-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
K. Lammintausta
E. Zimerson
T. Hasan
P. Susitaival
S. Winhoven
B. Gruvberger
M. Beck
J D Williams
M. Bruze
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, Turku University Hospital, PO Box 52, 20521 Turku, Finland. kaija.lammintausta@tyks.fi
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2010 Jan;162(1):108-16
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Allergens - toxicity
Antifungal Agents - chemistry - toxicity
Chromatography, Thin Layer
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Fumarates - chemistry - toxicity
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Great Britain - epidemiology
Humans
Interior Design and Furnishings
Male
Middle Aged
Patch Tests - adverse effects
Abstract
Background Sitting in new chairs or sofas has elicited dermatitis in numerous patients in Finland and in the U.K. since autumn 2006. The cause of the dermatitis seemed to be an allergen in the furniture materials. Objectives To determine the cause of the dermatitis in patients with furniture-related dermatitis. Methods Altogether 42 patients with furniture-related dermatitis were studied. First, 14 Finnish patients were patch tested with the standardized series and with the chair textile material. A thin-layer chromatogram (TLC) strip and an extract made from the same textile material were tested in seven Finnish patients. The test positive spot of the TLC and the content of a sachet found inside a sofa in the U.K. were analysed by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. All chemicals analysed were patch tested in 37 patients. Results A positive patch test reaction to the chair textile and to its extract was seen in all patients tested, one-third of whom had concurrent reactions to acrylates. Positive reactions to the same spot of the TLC strip were seen in five of seven patients and dimethyl fumarate was analysed from the spot as well as from the sachet contents. Dimethyl fumarate (0.01%) elicited positive reactions in all the patients. The other chemicals analysed did not elicit positive reactions, but one patient in the U.K. had a positive reaction to tributyl phosphate. Conclusions Sensitization to dimethyl fumarate was seen in all the patients with furniture-related dermatitis. Concurrent sensitization or cross-reactions were common among the sensitized patients.
PubMed ID
19796182 View in PubMed
Less detail

An oral challenge test with carmine red (E120) in skin prick test positive patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269204
Source
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol. 2015 Nov;47(6):206-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
J. Liippo
K. Lammintausta
Source
Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol. 2015 Nov;47(6):206-10
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Adult
Aged
Carmine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Food Coloring Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Food Hypersensitivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology
Humans
Intradermal Tests
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Single-Blind Method
Young Adult
Abstract
Positive skin prick test reactions to carmine red (E120) occur in approximately 3% of the patients studied for food allergy. Carmine ingestion associated systemic symptoms are occasionally suspected, but sufficient information of proven carmine allergy is not available.
To analyse carmine related symptoms in skin prick test positive patients a cohort of 23 patients with suspected allergy to carmine red was subjected to a single-blind placebo-controlled oral challenge test with carmine red.
Five patients developed clinical symptoms during the placebo-controlled oral challenge. As a result, the overall frequency of clinical carmine allergy is estimated to be 0.7% in general dermatology patients studied for food-associated symptoms.
Oral challenge test provides a valuable in vivo tool to better inform patients with positive skin prick tests to additives to avoid false allergy diets.
PubMed ID
26549338 View in PubMed
Less detail

An outbreak of furniture related dermatitis ('sofa dermatitis') in Finland and the UK: history and clinical cases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148253
Source
J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2010 Apr;24(4):486-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
P. Susitaival
S M Winhoven
J. Williams
K. Lammintausta
T. Hasan
M H Beck
B. Gruvberger
E. Zimerson
M. Bruze
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, North Carelia Central Hospital, Joensuu, Finland. paivikki.susitaival@pkssk.fi
Source
J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2010 Apr;24(4):486-9
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology - etiology
Dermatologic Agents - adverse effects - contraindications
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Fumarates - adverse effects - contraindications
Great Britain - epidemiology
Humans
Interior Design and Furnishings
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
In February 2007, an epidemic of severe dermatitis from Chinese recliner chairs and sofas started to unfold first in Finland and a few months later in the UK. Some patients reacted in patch tests (PTs) strongly to the material of their furniture, either leather or fabric. There have been hundreds of reports of chair or sofa dermatitis from Finland and the UK, with all cases linked to the same furniture factory in China. Clinical findings in both countries were very similar and unlike any known dermatosis. Many cases have been quite severe, resembling mycosis fungoides or septic infections, requiring hospitalization. Commercial PTs did not reveal the cause but a fungicide was strongly suspected, although such use was denied by the factory. The laboratory of Malm? University Dermatology Clinic has helped in the process by making thin layer chromatograms from sofa or chair materials and test substances of suspected chemicals. Finally, sachets marked with 'mouldproof agent' were found in varying numbers and distribution in the sofas. These contained dimethyl fumarate (DMF) which proved in skin tests to cause strong positive reactions with down to 0.01 dilution. Reports from other countries (Belgium, France, Ireland, Sweden and Spain) have since appeared, and the EU has banned the use of DMF in consumer products.
PubMed ID
19796087 View in PubMed
Less detail

Course of hand dermatitis in hospital workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242965
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 1982 Sep;8(5):327-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1982
Author
K. Lammintausta
K. Kalimo
S. Aantaa
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 1982 Sep;8(5):327-32
Date
Sep-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Dermatitis, Atopic - chemically induced
Dermatitis, Occupational - chemically induced
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Hand Dermatoses - chemically induced
Humans
Middle Aged
Nickel - adverse effects
Odors
Patch Tests
Personnel, Hospital
Abstract
The occurrence and course of hand dermatitis in hospital workers was studied on the basis of the patient register of an occupational specialist and by a clinical follow-up study. About 1% of all the hospital workers had had dermatitis, cleaners, kitchen workers and nurses most frequently. 54% of the patients who were clinically studied had suffered from periodic symptoms and 35% had current hand dermatitis. Those who had previous or present atopic dermatitis had most frequently developed dermatitis during the first year of their service. An atopic constitution seemed to predispose to the development of permanent or periodic hand dermatitis. The patients with sensitivity to nickel or fragrances had relapses in the majority of cases. During the study period, the incidence of new dermatitis cases was constant, but the number of days sick leave showed a decreasing tendency.
PubMed ID
6216051 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cutaneous adverse reactions to clindamycin: results of skin tests and oral exposure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190488
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2002 Apr;146(4):643-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
K. Lammintausta
R. Tokola
K. Kalimo
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, Turku University Central Hospital, 20520 Turku, Finland. kaija.lammintausta@tyks.fi
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2002 Apr;146(4):643-8
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Adult
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Clindamycin - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Drug Eruptions - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
False Negative Reactions
False Positive Reactions
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patch Tests - methods
Registries
Abstract
Clindamycin is an antibiotic used in anaerobic and severe complicated infections. It is often selected for patients with a history of allergy to other antibiotics.
To study the occurrence of clindamycin hypersensitivity and to determine whether skin tests are useful in cases of suspected clindamycin allergy.
Six patients with an exanthematous rash and a history strongly suggestive of clindamycin hypersensitivity were studied with skin tests and oral exposure. Cases of suspected adverse drug reactions to clindamycin reported to the National Register of Adverse Effects of Drugs (NRAED) in Finland during 1973-2000 were analysed.
In the skin tests true-positive patch test reactions were seen in four of six patients, while 22 healthy control patients were negative. One false-positive and one false-negative patch test reaction were seen. During 1973-2000, 29 suspected cases of skin and/or mucosal membranes affected by clindamycin were reported to the NRAED.
Clindamycin hypersensitivity is not common. Delayed-type allergic reactions occur and patch tests are useful in those cases. Oral exposure is the method of choice if possible, as false-negative and false-positive reactions may occur.
PubMed ID
11966697 View in PubMed
Less detail

A multicenter study of patch test reactions with dental screening series.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194326
Source
Am J Contact Dermat. 2001 Jun;12(2):83-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
L. Kanerva
T. Rantanen
K. Aalto-Korte
T. Estlander
M. Hannuksela
R J Harvima
T. Hasan
M. Horsmanheimo
R. Jolanki
K. Kalimo
A. Lahti
K. Lammintausta
A. Lauerma
A. Niinimäki
K. Turjanmaa
A M Vuorela
Author Affiliation
Section of Dermatology, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Am J Contact Dermat. 2001 Jun;12(2):83-7
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - adverse effects
Dentistry
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology - etiology
Dermatitis, Occupational - epidemiology - etiology
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Patch Tests - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Dental products contain many allergens, and may cause problems both for patients undergoing dental treatment and for dental personnel because of occupational exposure. Individual patch test clinics may not study sufficient numbers of patients to collect reliable data on uncommon allergens.
To collect information on dental allergens based on a multicenter study.
The Finnish Contact Dermatitis Group tested more than 4,000 patients (for most allergens, 2,300 to 2,600 patients) with dental screening series. Conventional patch testing was performed. The total number and percentage of irritant (scored as irritant [IR] or doubtful [?]) and allergic (scored as +, ++, or +++) patch test reactions, respectively, were calculated, as well as the highest and lowest percentage of allergic patch test reactions recorded by the different patch test clinics. A reaction index (RI) was calculated, giving information on the irritancy of the patch test substances.
The most frequent allergic patch test reactions were caused by nickel (14.6%), ammoniated mercury (13%), mercury (10.3%), gold (7.7%), benzoic acid (4.3%), palladium (4.2%) and cobalt (4.1%). 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (2.8%) provoked most of the reactions caused by (meth)acrylates. Menthol, peppermint oil, ammonium tetrachloroplatinate, and amalgam alloying metals provoked no (neither allergic nor irritant) patch test reactions.
Patch testing with allergens in the dental screening series, including (meth)acrylates and mercury, needs to be performed to detect contact allergy to dental products.
PubMed ID
11381343 View in PubMed
Less detail

Patch test reactions to cosmetic allergens in 1995-1997 and 2000-2002 in Finland--a multicentre study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174157
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2005 Jul;53(1):40-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
T. Hasan
T. Rantanen
K. Alanko
R J Harvima
R. Jolanki
K. Kalimo
A. Lahti
K. Lammintausta
A I Lauerma
A. Laukkanen
T. Luukkaala
R. Riekki
K. Turjanmaa
E. Varjonen
A-M Vuorela
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, University of Tampere and Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland. taina.hasan@pshp.fi
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2005 Jul;53(1):40-5
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - adverse effects
Cosmetics - adverse effects
Deodorants - adverse effects
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - diagnosis - etiology
Female
Finland
Hair Preparations - adverse effects
Health Education - methods
Humans
Male
Patch Tests - methods - standards
Perfume - adverse effects
Plant Extracts - adverse effects
Predictive value of tests
Propolis - adverse effects
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Contact sensitivity to cosmetics is common, but the sensitizing chemicals vary between countries and study periods. The present survey aimed at revealing the recent trends in patch test sensitivity with cosmetic chemicals in Finland. We report a retrospective multicentre survey of patch test reactions focusing on cosmetic-related substances and comparing the test results in 1995-97 with those in 2000-02. The most striking increases in the frequency of the patch test sensitivity were found with balsam of Peru and propolis from 4.0% to 6.2% (P
PubMed ID
15982231 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prevalence of atopic disorders among adolescents in Turku, Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223716
Source
Allergy. 1992 Jun;47(3):243-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1992
Author
E. Varjonen
K. Kalimo
K. Lammintausta
P. Terho
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, University of Turku, Finland.
Source
Allergy. 1992 Jun;47(3):243-8
Date
Jun-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Asthma - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Food Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - epidemiology
Male
Prevalence
Rhinitis - epidemiology
Urban health
Abstract
A study of the prevalence of atopic disorders among 15-16-year-old teenagers was carried out in a coastal urban town in south-western Finland. Altogether, 1712 children were found in that age group, all previously examined by a pediatrician. Each child who had present or previous allergic diseases was invited for a detailed study, a total of 434 (25%) pupils. Of these patients 416 (95.8%) participated in clinical examination and skin testing. The prevalence of atopic diseases was 21% in the studied group; atopic eczema was found in 9.7%, allergic rhinitis in 14% and asthma in 2.5%. Of subjects who had rhinitis, 38% also had atopic eczema, while rhinitis--as the only symptom--was found in 8.8%. Figures obtained from this survey suggest that the prevalence rates of atopic diseases are about the same as found 10 years ago in Finland and they correspond also with other recent reports.
PubMed ID
1510236 View in PubMed
Less detail

8 records – page 1 of 1.