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11 records – page 1 of 2.

Allergens of Ficus benjamina (weeping fig): unique allergens in sap.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171026
Source
Allergy. 2006 Mar;61(3):393-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006

Contact allergy to dental restorative materials in patients with oral lichenoid lesions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209139
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 1997 Mar;36(3):141-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1997
Author
J. Laine
K. Kalimo
R P Happonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Diseases, University Central Hospital of Turku, Finland.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 1997 Mar;36(3):141-6
Date
Mar-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Case-Control Studies
Dental Amalgam - adverse effects
Dermatitis, Contact - complications - etiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lichen Planus, Oral - epidemiology - pathology
Male
Mercury Compounds - adverse effects
Middle Aged
Patch Tests
Abstract
118 patients with oral lichenoid lesions (OLL) topographically related to dental fillings were patch tested (PT) to reveal contact allergy to restorative materials. 80 (67.8%) patients displayed positive PT reactions to metals of dental filling materials: 76 reactions were found to various mercury compounds, 4 to sodium aurothiosulphate, 3 to stannic chloride and 2 to silver nitrate. The positive patch test reactions appeared more commonly in patients with restricted contact lesions (85.1%, type-1 lesions) as compared to patients with lesions exceeding to the adjacent areas (38.6%, type-2 lesions). The replacement of dental fillings was carried out in 62/80 PT-positive and 15/38 PT-negative patients. 28 out of 62 (45.2%) PT-positive and 3/15 (20%) PT-negative patients showed complete healing of OLL after a mean follow-up time of 16 months. Complete healing occurred in 29/54 (54.0%) type-1 and 2/23 (8.7%) type-2 lesions. Topographical relation between the lesion and the filling material (restricted versus exceeding the contact area) indicated association of OLL lesion and the filling material, which could be further confirmed by patch testing in the majority of patients. The patch test series should include mercuric chloride (0.1%), mercury (0.5%) and mercury ammonium chloride (1.0%), each in pet.
PubMed ID
9145263 View in PubMed
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Course of hand dermatitis in hospital workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242965
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 1982 Sep;8(5):327-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1982
Author
K. Lammintausta
K. Kalimo
S. Aantaa
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 1982 Sep;8(5):327-32
Date
Sep-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Dermatitis, Atopic - chemically induced
Dermatitis, Occupational - chemically induced
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Hand Dermatoses - chemically induced
Humans
Middle Aged
Nickel - adverse effects
Odors
Patch Tests
Personnel, Hospital
Abstract
The occurrence and course of hand dermatitis in hospital workers was studied on the basis of the patient register of an occupational specialist and by a clinical follow-up study. About 1% of all the hospital workers had had dermatitis, cleaners, kitchen workers and nurses most frequently. 54% of the patients who were clinically studied had suffered from periodic symptoms and 35% had current hand dermatitis. Those who had previous or present atopic dermatitis had most frequently developed dermatitis during the first year of their service. An atopic constitution seemed to predispose to the development of permanent or periodic hand dermatitis. The patients with sensitivity to nickel or fragrances had relapses in the majority of cases. During the study period, the incidence of new dermatitis cases was constant, but the number of days sick leave showed a decreasing tendency.
PubMed ID
6216051 View in PubMed
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Cutaneous adverse reactions to clindamycin: results of skin tests and oral exposure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190488
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2002 Apr;146(4):643-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
K. Lammintausta
R. Tokola
K. Kalimo
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, Turku University Central Hospital, 20520 Turku, Finland. kaija.lammintausta@tyks.fi
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2002 Apr;146(4):643-8
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Adult
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Clindamycin - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Drug Eruptions - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
False Negative Reactions
False Positive Reactions
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patch Tests - methods
Registries
Abstract
Clindamycin is an antibiotic used in anaerobic and severe complicated infections. It is often selected for patients with a history of allergy to other antibiotics.
To study the occurrence of clindamycin hypersensitivity and to determine whether skin tests are useful in cases of suspected clindamycin allergy.
Six patients with an exanthematous rash and a history strongly suggestive of clindamycin hypersensitivity were studied with skin tests and oral exposure. Cases of suspected adverse drug reactions to clindamycin reported to the National Register of Adverse Effects of Drugs (NRAED) in Finland during 1973-2000 were analysed.
In the skin tests true-positive patch test reactions were seen in four of six patients, while 22 healthy control patients were negative. One false-positive and one false-negative patch test reaction were seen. During 1973-2000, 29 suspected cases of skin and/or mucosal membranes affected by clindamycin were reported to the NRAED.
Clindamycin hypersensitivity is not common. Delayed-type allergic reactions occur and patch tests are useful in those cases. Oral exposure is the method of choice if possible, as false-negative and false-positive reactions may occur.
PubMed ID
11966697 View in PubMed
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A multicenter study of patch test reactions with dental screening series.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194326
Source
Am J Contact Dermat. 2001 Jun;12(2):83-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
L. Kanerva
T. Rantanen
K. Aalto-Korte
T. Estlander
M. Hannuksela
R J Harvima
T. Hasan
M. Horsmanheimo
R. Jolanki
K. Kalimo
A. Lahti
K. Lammintausta
A. Lauerma
A. Niinimäki
K. Turjanmaa
A M Vuorela
Author Affiliation
Section of Dermatology, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Am J Contact Dermat. 2001 Jun;12(2):83-7
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - adverse effects
Dentistry
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology - etiology
Dermatitis, Occupational - epidemiology - etiology
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Patch Tests - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Dental products contain many allergens, and may cause problems both for patients undergoing dental treatment and for dental personnel because of occupational exposure. Individual patch test clinics may not study sufficient numbers of patients to collect reliable data on uncommon allergens.
To collect information on dental allergens based on a multicenter study.
The Finnish Contact Dermatitis Group tested more than 4,000 patients (for most allergens, 2,300 to 2,600 patients) with dental screening series. Conventional patch testing was performed. The total number and percentage of irritant (scored as irritant [IR] or doubtful [?]) and allergic (scored as +, ++, or +++) patch test reactions, respectively, were calculated, as well as the highest and lowest percentage of allergic patch test reactions recorded by the different patch test clinics. A reaction index (RI) was calculated, giving information on the irritancy of the patch test substances.
The most frequent allergic patch test reactions were caused by nickel (14.6%), ammoniated mercury (13%), mercury (10.3%), gold (7.7%), benzoic acid (4.3%), palladium (4.2%) and cobalt (4.1%). 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (2.8%) provoked most of the reactions caused by (meth)acrylates. Menthol, peppermint oil, ammonium tetrachloroplatinate, and amalgam alloying metals provoked no (neither allergic nor irritant) patch test reactions.
Patch testing with allergens in the dental screening series, including (meth)acrylates and mercury, needs to be performed to detect contact allergy to dental products.
PubMed ID
11381343 View in PubMed
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Nickel allergy and orthodontic treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178721
Source
J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2004 Sep;18(5):543-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
K. Kalimo
L. Mattila
H. Kautiainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland. kirsti.kalimo@tyks.fi
Source
J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2004 Sep;18(5):543-5
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Allergens - adverse effects
Body Piercing - adverse effects
Child
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Nickel - adverse effects
Orthodontic Appliances - adverse effects
Patch Tests
Prevalence
Students - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Tolerance induction to prevent development of nickel allergy has been suggested with permanent dental braces. We wanted to find out which effect orthodontic treatments had had on the development of nickel allergy in university students.
We examined and patch tested 153 students, of whom 113 had a history of pierced skin, and 70 a history of orthodontic treatment roughly 10 years earlier.
All except one student with pierced skin were females. Development of nickel allergy was significantly associated with skin piercing (54% compared with 12%). At the time of the study, there was a slight but non-significant difference in the prevalence of nickel allergy between students who had been subjects for orthodontic treatment (49%) compared with non-treated ones (58%) if they had pierced skin. There were no significant differences in the development of nickel allergy among students who had had permanent dental braces before (50%) or after skin piercing (48%). However, from 40 students without skin piercing four of 11 (three males) with a history of permanent braces had developed nickel allergy, as compared with none of 22 (P = 0.008) without orthodontic treatment suggesting possibility of sensitization through dental devices.
Orthodontic treatment may not lead to tolerance induction on all occasions, and sensitization through permanent devices seems to be possible.
PubMed ID
15324389 View in PubMed
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Parental education in the treatment of childhood atopic eczema.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37925
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 1990;70(6):495-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
A. Broberg
K. Kalimo
B. Lindblad
G. Swanbeck
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, University of Göteborg, Sahlgrenska Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 1990;70(6):495-9
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Dermatitis, Atopic - drug therapy - therapy
Female
Health education
Humans
Hydrocortisone - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Infant
Male
Parents - education
Patient compliance
Questionnaires
Random Allocation
Sweden
Abstract
To evaluate the role of health education in the treatment of childhood atopic eczema, an eczema school was arranged for the parents. Fifty consecutive patients (aged 4 months-6 years 2 months) with atopic eczema of varying severity were randomly assigned into two groups; one group receiving routine information given by the physician during the medical visit, and the other group also visiting a trained nurse to receive further information on eczema treatment and practical training in controlling atopic eczema. The therapeutic effect was better in the group which had received extra guidance. We suggest that systematic training in eczema treatment should be organized as an important part of eczema treatment.
PubMed ID
1981422 View in PubMed
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Patch test reactions to cosmetic allergens in 1995-1997 and 2000-2002 in Finland--a multicentre study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174157
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2005 Jul;53(1):40-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
T. Hasan
T. Rantanen
K. Alanko
R J Harvima
R. Jolanki
K. Kalimo
A. Lahti
K. Lammintausta
A I Lauerma
A. Laukkanen
T. Luukkaala
R. Riekki
K. Turjanmaa
E. Varjonen
A-M Vuorela
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, University of Tampere and Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland. taina.hasan@pshp.fi
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2005 Jul;53(1):40-5
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - adverse effects
Cosmetics - adverse effects
Deodorants - adverse effects
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - diagnosis - etiology
Female
Finland
Hair Preparations - adverse effects
Health Education - methods
Humans
Male
Patch Tests - methods - standards
Perfume - adverse effects
Plant Extracts - adverse effects
Predictive value of tests
Propolis - adverse effects
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Contact sensitivity to cosmetics is common, but the sensitizing chemicals vary between countries and study periods. The present survey aimed at revealing the recent trends in patch test sensitivity with cosmetic chemicals in Finland. We report a retrospective multicentre survey of patch test reactions focusing on cosmetic-related substances and comparing the test results in 1995-97 with those in 2000-02. The most striking increases in the frequency of the patch test sensitivity were found with balsam of Peru and propolis from 4.0% to 6.2% (P
PubMed ID
15982231 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of atopic disorders among adolescents in Turku, Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223716
Source
Allergy. 1992 Jun;47(3):243-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1992
Author
E. Varjonen
K. Kalimo
K. Lammintausta
P. Terho
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, University of Turku, Finland.
Source
Allergy. 1992 Jun;47(3):243-8
Date
Jun-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Asthma - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Food Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - epidemiology
Male
Prevalence
Rhinitis - epidemiology
Urban health
Abstract
A study of the prevalence of atopic disorders among 15-16-year-old teenagers was carried out in a coastal urban town in south-western Finland. Altogether, 1712 children were found in that age group, all previously examined by a pediatrician. Each child who had present or previous allergic diseases was invited for a detailed study, a total of 434 (25%) pupils. Of these patients 416 (95.8%) participated in clinical examination and skin testing. The prevalence of atopic diseases was 21% in the studied group; atopic eczema was found in 9.7%, allergic rhinitis in 14% and asthma in 2.5%. Of subjects who had rhinitis, 38% also had atopic eczema, while rhinitis--as the only symptom--was found in 8.8%. Figures obtained from this survey suggest that the prevalence rates of atopic diseases are about the same as found 10 years ago in Finland and they correspond also with other recent reports.
PubMed ID
1510236 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of nickel allergy among Finnish university students in 1995.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195289
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2001 Apr;44(4):218-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
L. Mattila
M. Kilpeläinen
E O Terho
M. Koskenvuo
H. Helenius
K. Kalimo
Author Affiliation
Finnish Student Health Service, Kirkkotie 13 PL 28, FIN-20541 Turku, Finland.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2001 Apr;44(4):218-23
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Nickel - adverse effects
Patch Tests
Prevalence
Students - statistics & numerical data
Universities
Abstract
Nickel allergy was studied in a sample of 1st-year university students starting their studies in 1995. A total of 296 subjects (72%) of 413 invited participated in the clinical examination, and 284, 96 male and 188 female, were patch tested (69%). A history of nickel sensitization was enquired for. Prick tests and serum specific IgE levels were determined. Occurrence of atopic dermatitis, hand eczema, and current exposure to metals were recorded. Nickel allergy was encountered in 39% of all female students, in 42% of females with pierced skin, and in 14% of females without pierced skin. The corresponding figures for males were 3%, 7% and 3%. In the multiple regression analysis, the risk factors for nickel allergy were female sex (OR 8.1, p
PubMed ID
11260237 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.