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Role of gender in sexual behaviours and response to education in sexually transmitted infections in 17-year-old adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148394
Source
Midwifery. 2011 Apr;27(2):282-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Gun I Rembeck
Ronny K Gunnarsson
Author Affiliation
Research and Development Unit in Primary Health Care, Southern Älvsborg County, and Youth Centre/Ungdomsmottagningen Lerum, Lerum, Sweden. gun.rembeck@vgregion.se
Source
Midwifery. 2011 Apr;27(2):282-7
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Prevalence
Safe Sex - psychology
Sex Education - methods - standards
Sex Factors
Sexuality - psychology
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Unsafe Sex - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
to investigate gender differences in high school students with respect to sexual risk behaviours, and their perceptions of the effect of an educational programme on sexually transmitted infections (STIs). In addition, this study aimed to investigate differences between students in programmes preparing for university compared with vocational programmes. PARTICIPANTS, SETTING AND DESIGN: second-year high school adolescents from two communities in south-west Sweden were invited to participate in the study, and completed a questionnaire on sexual experience, sexual risk behaviours and the impact of the educational programme on STIs.
males took less responsibility for STI prevention than females. Furthermore, males perceived themselves to be less influenced by the STI education than females. Females had more experience of same-sex sexuality than males.
males take less responsibility for STI prevention than females. When planning STI education, it is important to consider gender, traditions and various learning styles. If STI education fails to reach males, the prevalence of these infections will continue to increase.
PubMed ID
19773100 View in PubMed
Less detail

The physician's self-evaluation of the consultation and patient outcome: a longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117605
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2013 Mar;31(1):26-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Gerd Carlsson Ahlén
Ronny K Gunnarsson
Author Affiliation
Primary Health Care Älvängen, Sweden. gerd.carlsson.ahlen@vgregion.se
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2013 Mar;31(1):26-30
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Family Practice - standards
Humans
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Patient satisfaction
Quality of Health Care
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
To study whether the physician's evaluation of the consultation correlates to patient outcome one month later concerning symptom relief, sick leave, and drug compliance as perceived by the patient. The study also investigated whether the patient's evaluation of the consultation correlated to patient outcome.
A longitudinal study using questionnaires.
A county in south-western Sweden. Subjects. Forty-six physicians and 316 primary care patients aged 16 years or more with a new complaint lasting one week or more were invited. A total of 289 patients completed a questionnaire presented at the consultation; 273 patients were reached in a follow-up telephone interview one month after the consultation.
The association between each statement in the physician-patient questionnaire (PPQ) from the consultation and the answers obtained from the telephone interview were analysed by either multiple linear or logistic regression analysis.
Five out of 10 items in the PPQ were significantly associated with patient outcome. Physician's self-evaluation of the consultation was much more strongly associated with patient outcome than the patient's evaluation.
The difference between the physician's and patient's evaluation of the consultation to predict patient outcomes indicates that the physician's self-evaluation of the consultation is of importance.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23281893 View in PubMed
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Improving pre- and postmenarcheal 12-year-old girls' attitudes toward menstruation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30082
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2004 Aug;25(7):680-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
Gun I Rembeck
Ronny K Gunnarsson
Author Affiliation
Youth Center in Lerum, Primary Health Care, Southern Elfsborg County, Sweden. gun.rembeck@vgregion.se
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2004 Aug;25(7):680-98
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adolescent Psychology
Awareness
Child
Comparative Study
Female
Health Education - standards
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Menarche - psychology
Menstruation - psychology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Adolescence - prevention & control
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Education - standards
Sweden
Women's health
Abstract
Adolescence is a time of rapid changes, including risk for unwanted pregnancies and sexually transmitted infections. Education may improve understanding and attitudes toward menstruation among adolescents thus increasing their awareness of risks and enabling them to protect themselves accordingly. To investigate effects of education on attitudes, two interventions were compared in 345 12-year-old girls. The new, active intervention given to premenarcheal girls just before menarche resulted in improvements in attitudes toward menstruation compared with standard intervention. Thus, just before menarche girls should be offered education modeled after the active intervention. The education must be concrete and based on multisensory learning.
PubMed ID
15487486 View in PubMed
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Presenting the improved possibility for staying well might be better than talking about change in risk: use of the non-occurrence probability increase (NOPI).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108419
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2013 Sep;31(3):138-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Bertil Hagström
Ronny K Gunnarsson
Mark Rosenfeld
Author Affiliation
Research and Development Unit, Primary Health Care and Dental Care, Southern Älvsborg County, Region Västra Götaland, Sweden. bertil.hagstrom@telia.co
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2013 Sep;31(3):138-40
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - drug therapy - prevention & control
Decision Making
General practice
General Practitioners - psychology
Humans
Patient compliance
Patient Education as Topic
Physician's Practice Patterns
Probability
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Risk Reduction Behavior
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Talking about risk with patients is problematic since the individual's risk is not addressed and is usually very low. This study aimed to see how fact presentation influenced the decision-making process for general practitioners concerning treatment for the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Rather than looking at the risk of becoming ill, often presented as high figures of relative risk reduction (RRR), it could be useful to present the probability of staying well, i.e. from the concept of non-occurrence probability (NOP) and non-occurrence probability increase (NOPI)--simply a single measure of change in NOP.
General practitioners (GPs) had personal response keypads to answer two questions, presented differently, concerning whether they would allow themselves to be treated or not be treated for the risk of cardiovascular death.
Five audiences consisting of general practitioners attending lectures.
When the question was presented as RRR, 68% and 86%, respectively, of the physicians responded that they would take the decision to treat. When presented as the concept of NOPI the figures were reduced to 18% and 16%, respectively (p
Notes
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Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2012 Jun;30(2):101-622643155
PubMed ID
23889596 View in PubMed
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The prevalence of potential pathogenic bacteria in nasopharyngeal samples from healthy children and adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33877
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1998 Mar;16(1):13-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1998
Author
R K Gunnarsson
S E Holm
M. Söderström
Author Affiliation
Department of Primary Health Care, Vasa Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1998 Mar;16(1):13-7
Date
Mar-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Carrier State - epidemiology
Cell Culture Techniques
Child
Child care
Child, Preschool
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Nose - microbiology
Pharynx - microbiology
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Seasons
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To elucidate the prevalence of potential pathogenic bacteria in nasopharyngeal samples from healthy individuals, and the influence on the carrier rate of age, season of the year, and type of child day care. DESIGN: Nasopharyngeal swab samples obtained in routine medical care from individuals with no sign of infection were studied in 159 pre-school children aged below 7 years, 198 schoolchildren aged 7-15 years, and 261 adults (.16 years). RESULTS: The prevalence of pathogenic bacteria in healthy individuals decreased with age. The overall isolation frequencies for pre-schoolchildren, schoolchildren, and adults, respectively, were: Moraxella catarrhalis (27%, 4% and 2%); Streptococcus pneumoniae (19%, 6% and 0.8%); Haemophilus influenzae (13%, 6% and 3%). The prevalence of S. pneumoniae in children 7-15 years was higher during the summer than in the winter. We could not confirm any variation in the carrier rate due to the type of child day care. CONCLUSION: Potentially pathogenic bacteria are often present in nasopharyngeal samples taken from healthy pre-school children, but rarely from people > or = 16 years of age. This means that the use of nasopharyngeal samples to discriminate between bacterial and viral respiratory tract infection needs to be evaluated further in patients
PubMed ID
9612873 View in PubMed
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The prevalence of potential pathogenic bacteria in nasopharyngeal samples from individuals with a respiratory tract infection and a sore throat--implications for the diagnosis of pharyngotonsillitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32183
Source
Fam Pract. 2001 Jun;18(3):266-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
R K Gunnarsson
S E Holm
M. Söderström
Author Affiliation
Department of Primary Health Care, Göteborg University, Sweden.
Source
Fam Pract. 2001 Jun;18(3):266-71
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bacteriological Techniques
Carrier State - epidemiology - microbiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Haemophilus Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Haemophilus influenzae
Humans
Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis
Nasopharynx - microbiology
Neisseriaceae Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Pharyngitis - epidemiology - microbiology
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Streptococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Streptococcus pneumoniae
Sweden - epidemiology
Tonsillitis - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Treatment failure in patients with pharyngotonsillitis after a traditional course of penicillin V is a common finding. Several factors have been proposed to explain the failure rate, but the presence of aetiological agents other than group A beta-haemolytic streptococci has attracted little attention. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to investigate if a nasopharyngeal sample could suggest the aetiology of a sore throat in patients with a respiratory tract infection. METHODS: The prevalence of potentially pathogenic bacteria (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis) in nasopharyngeal samples from 618 healthy individuals was compared with that from 108 patients with a respiratory tract infection and a sore throat. RESULTS: The prevalence of H.influenzae was higher in patients with a sore throat than in healthy individuals of the same age. For the adult patients with a sore throat, the prevalence was 27.5% compared with 2.7% for the healthy carriers (P
PubMed ID
11356732 View in PubMed
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Patient-centred attitudes among medical students: gender and work experience in health care make a difference.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97523
Source
Med Teach. 2010;32(4):e191-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Mats Wahlqvist
Ronny K Gunnarsson
Gösta Dahlgren
Svante Nordgren
Author Affiliation
University of Gothenburg, SE 405 30, Gothenburg,Sweden. mats.wahlqvist@allmed.gu.se
Source
Med Teach. 2010;32(4):e191-8
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Education, Medical, Undergraduate
Female
Humans
Male
Physician-Patient Relations
Questionnaires
Students, Medical - psychology
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Previous studies of medical students' patient-centred attitudes show a decline across undergraduate education and overall higher scores for female students. AIM: To assess undergraduate students' patient-centred attitudes at various stages of education and to explore possible associations between attitudes and age, gender and work experience in health care. METHODS: In autumn 2005, medical students in Gothenburg (n = 797) were asked to answer Patient-Practitioner Orientation Scale (PPOS), a validated instrument exploring attitudes towards the doctor-patient relationship. Data including gender, age, current term and students' work experience in health care were collected. RESULTS: Of 797 students 600 (75%) answered the questionnaire. No decrease of students' PPOS score across the curriculum was observed. PPOS scores from female students were higher compared to males (p
PubMed ID
20353319 View in PubMed
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What happened to the prescriptions? A single, short, standardized telephone call may increase compliance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71145
Source
Fam Pract. 2004 Feb;21(1):46-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004

Endovascular Versus Open Repair as Primary Strategy for Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: A National Population-based Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272524
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2016 Jan;51(1):22-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
K. Gunnarsson
A. Wanhainen
K. Djavani Gidlund
M. Björck
K. Mani
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2016 Jan;51(1):22-8
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - diagnosis - mortality - surgery
Aortic Rupture - diagnosis - mortality - surgery
Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation - adverse effects - mortality
Comorbidity
Endovascular Procedures - adverse effects - mortality
Female
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
In randomized trials, no peri-operative survival benefit has been shown for endovascular (EVAR) repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) when compared with open repair. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of primary repair strategy on early and midterm survival in a non-selected population based study.
The Swedish Vascular Registry was consulted to identify all rAAA repairs performed in Sweden in the period 2008-12. Centers with a primary EVAR strategy (treating > 50% of rAAA with EVAR) were compared with centers with a primary open repair strategy. Peri-operative outcome, midterm survival, and incidence of rAAA repair/100,000 inhabitants aged > 50 years were assessed.
In total, 1,304 patients were identified. Three primary EVAR centers (pEVARc) operated on 236 patients (74.6% EVAR). Twenty-six primary open repair centers (pORc) operated 1,068 patients (15.6% EVAR). Patients treated at pEVARc were more often referrals (28.0% vs. 5.3%; p
Notes
Comment In: Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2016 Jan;51(1):2926520179
PubMed ID
26238308 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.