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15 records – page 1 of 2.

An educational programme for persistent life-style changes in patients with chronic renal disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198460
Source
EDTNA ERCA J. 1999 Oct-Dec;25(4):42-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
K. Bergström
P. Bárány
I. Holm
Author Affiliation
Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm.
Source
EDTNA ERCA J. 1999 Oct-Dec;25(4):42-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - nursing - psychology - rehabilitation
Life Style
Patient Education as Topic - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Quality of Life
Self Care - methods - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to produce positive life-style changes in patients with chronic renal disease through a residential education programme about the medical aspects of chronic renal failure and the various treatment options in order to increase their physical capacity, emotional stability and general well-being. The programme was available to all categories of patients with chronic renal disease irrespective of treatment modality. Comparison of data pre and post course demonstrated improvements in physical activity, mental well-being and nutritional awareness.
PubMed ID
10827600 View in PubMed
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An orthopantomographic study of hypodontia, supernumeraries and other anomalies in school children between the ages of 8-9 years. An epidemiological study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature42108
Source
Swed Dent J. 1977;1(4):145-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
1977
Source
Lakartidningen. 1988 Nov 30;85(48):4194, 4199-2000
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-30-1988
Author
P. Sundström
S E Bergentz
K. Bergström
B. Hallén
U. Hedstrand
Y. Larsson
C E Westerberg
Source
Lakartidningen. 1988 Nov 30;85(48):4194, 4199-2000
Date
Nov-30-1988
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brain Death - diagnosis
Ethics, Medical
Humans
Sweden
PubMed ID
3200033 View in PubMed
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Caries and costs: an evaluation of a school-based fluoride varnish programme for adolescents in a Swedish region.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275899
Source
Community Dent Health. 2016 Jun;33(2):138-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
E K Bergström
P. Lingström
M. Hakeberg
L. Gahnberg
U M Sköld
Source
Community Dent Health. 2016 Jun;33(2):138-44
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cariostatic Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Cohort Studies
Cost Savings
Costs and Cost Analysis
DMF Index
Dental Care for Children - statistics & numerical data
Dental Caries - economics - epidemiology - prevention & control
Dental Restoration, Permanent - economics
Female
Fluorides, Topical - therapeutic use
Follow-Up Studies
Health Education, Dental - economics
Humans
Male
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
School Dentistry - economics
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
In 2003, 19 public dental clinics in Västra Götaland Region implemented a population-based programme with fluoride varnish applications at school every six months, for all 12 to 15 year olds. In 2008, the programme was extended to include all 112 clinics in the region.
To evaluate caries increment and to perform a cost analysis of the programme.
A retrospective design with caries data for two birth cohorts extracted from dental records. Three groups of adolescents were compared. For Group 1 (n = 3,132), born in 1993, the fluoride varnish programme started in 2003 and Group 2 (n = 13,490), also born in 1993, had no fluoride varnish programme at school. These groups were compared with Group 3 (n = 11,321), born in 1998, when the programme was implemented for all individuals. The total cost of the four-year programme was estimated at 400SEK (˜ 44€) per adolescent.
Caries prevalence and caries increment in 15 year olds were significantly lower after the implementation of the programme. Group 2, without a programme, had the highest caries increment. The cost analysis showed that it was a break-even between costs and gains due to prevented fillings at the age of 15.
This school-based fluoride varnish programme, implemented on a broad scale for all 12 to 15 year olds, contributed to a low caries increment at a low cost for the adolescents in the Västra Götaland Region in Sweden.
PubMed ID
27352469 View in PubMed
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Experience of collaboration at a family centre for preschool children in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306151
Source
Community Dent Health. 2020 Nov 30; 37(4):269-274
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-30-2020
Author
A M-A Alm
E-K Bergström
L Ljungkrona-Falk
T Wold-Bremer
G Idholt
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive and Community Dentistry, Public Dental Health Service, Västra Götaland Region, Sweden.
Source
Community Dent Health. 2020 Nov 30; 37(4):269-274
Date
Nov-30-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Child, Preschool
Family
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Oral Health
Qualitative Research
School Teachers
Sweden
Workforce
Abstract
In 2014, the Public Dental Health Service in Södra Ryd, Skövde, started a collaboration at the local family centre with the aim of performing health-promoting activities. Personnel at the family centre can play an important role in promoting children's health, including oral health, by testing preventive guidance.
To describe the personnel's experience of collaboration.
Qualitative interviews with transcripts analysed using the phenomenographic approach.
Seven staff with experience of collaboration. All were female, aged 34-62 and were dental nurses, child health-care nurses, preschool teacher or family centre co-ordinators.
Three themes describing personnel's experience of collaboration at the family centre emerged: Collaboration produces an holistic approach, Co-location creates added value and Working methods result in development. Each theme was represented by three to four categories that represent different conceptions of collaboration at a family centre.
The staff had found that the way of working was positive, mainly because it gave an increased overall view and that the co-location created added value. It also created development through mutual learning and new methods. However, it took time to establish collaboration and required permissive leadership.
PubMed ID
32306564 View in PubMed
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Hepatitis A infected food handler at an Edmonton, Alberta retail food facility: public health protection strategies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192517
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 2001 Nov 1;27(21):177-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2001
Author
L. Honish
K. Bergstrom
Author Affiliation
Capital Health-Regional Public Health, Edmonton, Alberta.
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 2001 Nov 1;27(21):177-80
Date
Nov-1-2001
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta - epidemiology
Food Handling
Food Microbiology
Hepatitis A - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Humans
Mass Media
Public Health Practice
Risk factors
PubMed ID
11709890 View in PubMed
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Orthodontic care from the patients' perspective: perceptions of 27-year-olds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72517
Source
Eur J Orthod. 1998 Jun;20(3):319-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
K. Bergström
A. Halling
B. Wilde
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Orthod. 1998 Jun;20(3):319-29
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Male
Orthodontics, Corrective - psychology
Patient Education
Patient satisfaction
Quality of Health Care
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Residence Characteristics
Self Assessment (Psychology)
Sex Factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
The aim was to analyse 27-year-olds' perceptions of their own dental arrangement and any orthodontic care they may have received as a child or adolescent. All of the individuals in a sample of young adults in Kronoberg County, Sweden, who had received orthodontic care during childhood or adolescence (n = 121) were selected to participate in the study. In addition, 76 orthodontically untreated individuals were randomly selected from the same sample. All participants, both those who had previously had orthodontic treatment and those who had not, were sent a questionnaire. Most of the respondents were satisfied with their earlier decision, whether to choose orthodontic treatment or not. Dental professionals were considered to have had the greatest influence on this decision. This means that the desire for treatment may be guided by the orthodontist. Three out of four individuals considered orthodontic treatment important, even when irregularities of the teeth were minor. A majority of the individuals thought that they would have been able to wear visible braces if needed, even in adulthood. Individuals treated by specialists were more contented than individuals treated by general practitioners. Individuals with malocclusions and treatment need, but who had refused offered treatment, were in general more discontented with their dental arrangement; more than half of them now regretted their decision. They also felt it more difficult to communicate questions, thoughts, and opinions on their own desire for treatment. An increased level of information, especially to these individuals, would have been desirable.
PubMed ID
9699410 View in PubMed
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Orthodontic care in Sweden. Outcome in three counties.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34990
Source
Swed Dent J Suppl. 1996;117:1-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
K. Bergström
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Swed Dent J Suppl. 1996;117:1-68
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Decision Making
Dentist-Patient Relations
Evaluation Studies
General Practice, Dental
Health Resources
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Malocclusion - psychology - therapy
Models, Theoretical
Orthodontics
Orthodontics, Corrective - classification - psychology
Patient Care Planning
Patient satisfaction
Public Health Dentistry
Serial Extraction
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Treatment Refusal
Abstract
The purpose of this series of studies was to evaluate the outcome of orthodontic care in Sweden from the professional's and the patient's perspective. In addition, a model was devised for the priority-planning of orthodontic care and for evaluating the different factors influencing the decision for orthodontic treatment. The results may be summarized as follows: Treatment Decision. Treatment desire, followed by treatment need and treatment benefit were the most important factors to consider when deciding whether or not treatment should be carried out. Regardless of the differences in resources and the structure of the free public care, a substantial proportion of the untreated 19-year-olds had malocclusions with treatment need, but they had no desire for treatment. Most of the 27-year-old individuals were satisfied with their earlier treatment decision, regardless of whether they had undergone orthodontic treatment. Dental professionals were considered to have had the greatest influence on this decision, which means that desire for treatment may be guided by the orthodontist. Individuals with malocclusions and treatment need--but who had refused proposed orthodontic treatment--were in general more discontented with their dental arrangement than other respondents, and a majority of them regretted their decision. Greater information to these individuals would have been desirable. Resources and Treatments Provided by General Practitioners or by Specialists. The sparsity of specialist resources resulted in either a greater restriction on the number necessary treatments being initiated or a greater proportion of the treatment being provided by general practitioners. In the 3 counties analysed, the treatment standard correlated well with the available resources: the greater the number of orthodontic specialists and ability to supervise the work of general practitioners and taking care of patients in need of specialist treatment, the higher the standard of treatment. Individuals treated by specialists were more contented than individuals treated by general practitioners. The measures of treatment outcome in general yielded more favourable scores for specialist treatments than for treatments provided by general practitioners, despite the specialist treatments on the average being classified as more difficult than those provided by general practitioners. Perceived treatment difficulty. About one-fourth of all treatments were classified as easy, one-fourth as moderately difficult, and one-half as difficult. The perceived treatment difficulty was associated on a group basis with the pretreatment need. The treatment investment increased and the treatment outcome became less favourable with increasing perceived difficulty. The treatment outcome was least favourable in the group where no treatment was suggested. Almost every fourth treatment was successfully carried out by mere extraction therapy. Attitudes in 27-year-olds. Orthodontic treatment was considered important by three out of four individuals, even in cases where irregularities of the teeth were small. A majority of the individuals thought that they would have been able to wear visible braces if needed, even in adult age. Methodological aspects. Studies that have used different indices to evaluate treatment outcome can only be compared with great caution. Measures with wide bases for evaluation may be more valid than measures with narrow bases. To estimate treatment outcome in terms of decrease of treatment need, the Indication Index may be recommended.
PubMed ID
8971995 View in PubMed
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Orthodontic care provided by general practitioners and specialists in three Swedish counties with different orthodontic specialist resources.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213439
Source
Swed Dent J. 1996;20(1-2):35-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
K. Bergström
A. Halling
Author Affiliation
Orthodontic Clinic, Växjö, Sweden.
Source
Swed Dent J. 1996;20(1-2):35-50
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Chi-Square Distribution
General Practice, Dental - statistics & numerical data
Health Resources - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Malocclusion - epidemiology - therapy
Orthodontics - manpower - statistics & numerical data
Orthodontics, Corrective - statistics & numerical data
Orthodontics, Interceptive - statistics & numerical data
Rural Population
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban Population
Abstract
Three counties in Sweden (A, G, and W) with free orthodontic care and different orthodontic resources and geographic structures were studied in 1987. Samples of totally 942 young adults (mean age 18.8 years, SD 0.44) were examined concerning malocclusions and all orthodontic treatment provided by general practitioners or by orthodontic specialists. The care in a rural area (county G) with abundant specialist resources was based on specialist treatments easy assessable to the patients and supplemented by treatments, mainly without appliances and provided by general practitioners. There was a generous attitude of consultation with specialists and of providing treatment. The sparsity of specialist resources had in an urban area (county A) resulted in a greater restriction on providing treatments. The treatments were performed in a higher age and were, to a greater extent, not completed by the age of 19, and a smaller percentage of individuals were treated than in the other two counties. The care in a large rural area (county W) with long distances to the only specialist clinic was based on treatments provided by general practitioners. In spite of the few specialist resources there was a generous attitude of providing treatments. Interceptive methods were used to a great extent, and later completed with appliance therapy. According to a treatment priority index 44% of the untreated individuals in the three counties had malocclusions and an objective treatment need, and there were no significant differences between the counties. Regardless of differences in specialist resources and structure of the free public orthodontic care, a substantial and equal proportion of the untreated individuals in the counties had malocclusions with treatment need, but they had no treatment desire.
PubMed ID
8738907 View in PubMed
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Orthodontic treatment demand--differences between urban and rural areas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33495
Source
Community Dent Health. 1998 Dec;15(4):272-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
K. Bergström
A. Halling
J. Huggare
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Community Dent Health. 1998 Dec;15(4):272-6
Date
Dec-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health
Child
Comparative Study
Educational Status
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Malocclusion - therapy
Orthodontics, Corrective
Parents
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Patient compliance
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Residence Characteristics
Retrospective Studies
Rural Health
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Urban health
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare the outcome of orthodontic treatment and the desire for further treatment in 19-year-old young adults treated by specialists in urban and rural areas and to study the influence of the level of education of their parents. DESIGN: The individuals were clinically and retrospectively examined with reference to malocclusions and orthodontic treatment received during childhood and adolescence. SETTING: Orthodontic department in Kronoberg County, Sweden. SUBJECTS: From a sample of 302 young adults, all individuals who had received orthodontic treatment by specialists (n = 60) were selected. OUTCOME MEASURES: The individuals were compared according to outcome of treatment and place of residence. The pre-treatment need, the residual treatment need, the treatment results, and the desire for further treatment were estimated as well as treatment duration, number of visits, percentages of discontinued treatments and parents' level of education. RESULTS: There was a higher frequency of individuals without previous treatment and a lower frequency of specialist-treated individuals in rural areas than in urban areas in the county. The treatments implied substantial improvements, with a higher reduction of treatment need and a higher degree of success in patients from urban areas than from rural areas (P
PubMed ID
9973729 View in PubMed
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15 records – page 1 of 2.