Skip header and navigation

Refine By

8 records – page 1 of 1.

Diabetes prevalence among older people receiving care at home: associations with symptoms, health status and psychological well-being.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301150
Source
Diabet Med. 2019 01; 36(1):96-104
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2019
Author
T T Davies
M Graue
J Igland
G S Tell
K I Birkeland
M Peyrot
J Haltbakk
Author Affiliation
Centre for Evidence Based Practice, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Bergen.
Source
Diabet Med. 2019 01; 36(1):96-104
Date
01-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Checklist
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology - therapy
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Health status
Home Care Services - supply & distribution
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Psychometrics
Quality of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Life - psychology
Self Care - statistics & numerical data
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To determine the prevalence of diabetes among older people receiving care at home, and to explore differences in sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, symptoms, health status, quality of life and psychological well-being between diabetes categories defined as HbA1c = 48 mmol/mol (6.5%) and/or self-report.
A community-based sample of 377 people receiving care at home in Western Norway participated in a cross-sectional survey. Instruments included the MMSE-NR, Symptom Check-List, WHO Quality of Life-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF, global items), EuroQol EQ-5D-5L/EQ-5D-VAS and WHO-Five Well-Being Index (WHO-5). Participants were grouped into four categories: no diabetes, self-report only, HbA1c = 48 mmol/mol (6.5%) and self-report, and HbA1c = 48 mmol/mol (6.5%) only.
Median age (IQR) was 86 (81-91) years and 34% of the sample were men. We identified 92 people (24%) with diabetes. Diabetes was more prevalent in men than women (34% vs. 20%, age-adjusted P = 0.005). Among people with diabetes, 14% were unaware of their diagnosis. There were significant differences in symptoms between the diabetes categories, with more symptoms (abnormal thirst, polyuria, genital itching, nausea, excessive hunger, perspiring, cold hands/feet, daytime sleepiness) among the groups with elevated HbA1c . Significant differences in WHO-5, WHOQOL-BREF and EQ-5D-5L between diabetes categories were identified, with the poorest scores in the group with undiagnosed diabetes.
A high percentage of people with diabetes receiving care at home are unaware of their diagnosis. Diabetes deserves increased case-finding efforts and allocation of resources towards those receiving care at home to alleviate symptoms and the burden of inadequate diabetes care.
PubMed ID
30062788 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ethnic differences in postpartum weight retention: a Norwegian cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281990
Source
BJOG. 2016 04;123(5):699-708
Publication Type
Article
Date
04-2016
Author
C W Waage
R S Falk
C. Sommer
K. Mørkrid
K R Richardsen
A. Baerug
N. Shakeel
K I Birkeland
A K Jenum
Source
BJOG. 2016 04;123(5):699-708
Date
04-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
African Continental Ancestry Group
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Diet
Ethnic Groups
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Humans
Life Style
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity - epidemiology - ethnology
Overweight - epidemiology - ethnology
Population Surveillance
Postpartum Period - physiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - ethnology
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Weight Gain - ethnology
Abstract
To explore ethnic differences in weight retention 14 weeks postpartum.
Population-based cohort study.
The STORK Groruddalen Study.
A multi-ethnic cohort of healthy pregnant women attending primary antenatal care at three public Child Health Clinics, in Oslo, Norway (n = 642).
An explanatory linear regression was performed to model the relationship between ethnicity and postpartum weight retention. Forward selection of 12 explanatory factors was used to adjust for potential confounding factors, based on univariate analysis and adjusted R(2) .
Postpartum weight retention.
Unadjusted mean postpartum weight retention was 2.3 (4.9) kg for women from Western Europe and varied from 3.7 (3.5) to 6.3 (4.7) kg among the five ethnic minority groups. The proportion of women in the highest quintile (postpartum weight retention >8.5-24.4 kg) significantly differed by ethnicity (P 
PubMed ID
25716276 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ethnicity and sex are strong determinants of diabetes in an urban Western society: implications for prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47107
Source
Diabetologia. 2005 Mar;48(3):435-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
A K Jenum
I. Holme
S. Graff-Iversen
K I Birkeland
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, PO Box 4404, Nydalen, 0403, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Diabetologia. 2005 Mar;48(3):435-9
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Body mass index
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - pathology
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Characteristics
Abstract
AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: This study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of diabetes and its association with ethnicity and sex, to identify subgroups at special risk. METHODS: We performed a population-based cross-sectional survey of 30- to 67-year-olds in an area of Oslo with low socio-economic status, and collected data using questionnaires, physical examinations and serum analyses for the 2,513 participants (attendance rate 49.3%). RESULTS: In the age group 30-59 years, mean BMI was 28.5 (95% CI: 27.5-29.6) for South Asian women, 26.1 (25.9-26.4) for Western women, 26.7 (26.1-27.4) for South Asian men and 27.2 (26.9-27.5) for Western men. The diabetes prevalence rates were 27.5% (18.1-36.9) for South Asian women, 2.9% (1.9-3.4) for Western women, 14.3% (8.0-20.7) for South Asian men and 5.9% (4.2-7.5) for Western men. The age-adjusted odds ratio (OR) for diabetes for women vs men was 1.9 (0.9-4.1) for South Asians, and 0.4 (0.3-0.6) for the Western population (p
PubMed ID
15729578 View in PubMed
Less detail

Higher frequency of hospitalization but lower relative mortality for pandemic influenza in people with type 2 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308739
Source
J Intern Med. 2020 01; 287(1):78-86
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2020
Author
P L D Ruiz
I J Bakken
S E Håberg
G Tapia
S H Hauge
K I Birkeland
H L Gulseth
L C Stene
Author Affiliation
From the, Department of Chronic Diseases and Ageing, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
J Intern Med. 2020 01; 287(1):78-86
Date
01-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza Vaccines
Influenza, Human - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Pandemics
Registries
Sex Distribution
Vaccination - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
There is limited evidence linking type 2 diabetes (T2D) to influenza-related complications.
To test a set of research questions relating to pandemic influenza vaccination, hospitalization and mortality in people with and without T2D.
In this population-based cohort study, we linked individual-level data from several national registers for all Norwegian residents aged 30 years or more as of January 2009. People with or without T2D at baseline (n = 2 992 228) were followed until December 2013. We used Cox regression to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs).
Pandemic influenza hospitalization was more common in individuals with T2D (aHR = 2.46, 95% CI 2.04-2.98). The mortality hazard ratio associated with hospitalization for pandemic influenza was lower in people with T2D (aHR = 1.82, 95% CI 1.21-2.74) than in those without T2D (aHR = 3.89, 95% CI 3.27-4.62). The same pattern was observed when restricting to 90-day mortality (aHR = 3.89, 95% CI 1.25-12.06 amongst those with T2D and aHR = 10.79, 95% CI 7.23-16.10 amongst those without T2D). The rate of hospitalization for pandemic influenza was 78% lower in those vaccinated compared to nonvaccinated amongst people with T2D (aHR = 0.22, 95% CI 0.11-0.39), whilst the corresponding estimate for those without T2D was 59% lower (aHR = 0.41, 95% CI 0.33-0.52). Mortality was 25% lower in those vaccinated compared to nonvaccinated amongst people with T2D (aHR = 0.75, 95% CI 0.73-0.77), whilst the corresponding estimate for those without T2D was 9% (aHR = 0.91, 95% CI 0.90-0.92).
There may have been a lower threshold for pandemic influenza hospitalization for people with T2D, rather than more severe influenza infection. Our combined results support the importance of influenza vaccination amongst people with T2D, especially during pandemics.
PubMed ID
31587396 View in PubMed
Less detail

Inflammation and coronary angiography in asymptomatic type 2 diabetic subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163958
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2007;67(3):306-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
O E Johansen
K I Birkeland
E. Orvik
Ø. Flesland
R. Wergeland
T. Ueland
C. Smith
K. Endresen
P. Aukrust
L. Gullestad
Author Affiliation
Medical Department, Asker and Baerum Hospital, Rud, Norway. odd.erik.johansen@broadpark.no
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2007;67(3):306-16
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Comorbidity
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Disease - epidemiology - physiopathology - radiography
Coronary Stenosis - epidemiology - radiography
Diabetes Complications - epidemiology - physiopathology - radiography
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology
Exercise Test
Female
Humans
Inflammation - blood - epidemiology
Interleukin-6 - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
Coronary artery disease (CAD) is prevalent in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and because it is often asymptomatic and extensive in comparison with CAD in subjects without diabetes, it represents a diagnostic challenge. The objective of the study was to investigate the prevalence of CAD in asymptomatic T2DM patients utilizing angiography and to investigate its association with cardiovascular (CV) risk factors, the metabolic syndrome and markers of inflammation.
Eighty-two patients with T2DM without symptoms of CAD, and with >or=1 CV risk factor (hypertension, dyslipidaemia, premature familial CAD, smoking or microalbuminuria) underwent a diagnostic stress test and coronary angiography irrespective of stress test results. Stenosis detected in the main coronary arteries >or=50% of lumen diameter was categorized as one-, two- or three-vessel disease. Inflammatory markers were analysed in fasting samples.
Fifteen men and two women had significant CAD (21%) (1-vessel disease, n=10; 2- or 3-vessel disease, n=7). Patients with 2- or 3-vessel disease were significantly older and had a longer duration of diabetes, but the prevalence of other traditional CV risk factors or the metabolic syndrome was similar among those with 1-vessel and those with 2- or 3-vessel disease. Sensitivity for CAD of the stress test was low (0.35). The mean level of the pro-inflammatory marker interleukin-6 was elevated in patients with 2- to 3-vessel CAD as compared to patients with no or 1-vessel CAD (por=1 CV risk factor. Inflammatory markers may be helpful in identifying patients that are likely to have significant CAD, but larger studies are warranted.
PubMed ID
17454845 View in PubMed
Less detail

Objectively recorded physical activity and the association with gestational diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264492
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2014 Oct;24(5):e389-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
K. Mørkrid
A K Jenum
S. Berntsen
L. Sletner
K R Richardsen
S. Vangen
I. Holme
K I Birkeland
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2014 Oct;24(5):e389-97
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accelerometry
Adult
Diabetes, Gestational - diagnosis - epidemiology - ethnology
Female
Gestational Age
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Motor Activity - physiology
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Abstract
The aim of this population-based study was to assess the association between objectively recorded physical activity (PA) in early gestation and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) identified at 28 weeks of gestation in a multi-ethnic cohort of healthy pregnant women in Oslo, Norway. In total, 759 women were included. In early gestation (
PubMed ID
24894027 View in PubMed
Less detail

Objectively recorded physical activity in early pregnancy: a multiethnic population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260311
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2014 Jun;24(3):594-601
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
S. Berntsen
K R Richardsen
K. Mørkrid
L. Sletner
K I Birkeland
A K Jenum
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2014 Jun;24(3):594-601
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accelerometry
Adult
Africa South of the Sahara - ethnology
Central America - ethnology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Employment
Europe, Eastern - ethnology
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Humans
Middle East - ethnology
Norway
Pakistan - ethnology
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Pregnancy Trimester, Second
Scandinavian and Nordic Countries - ethnology
South America - ethnology
Sri Lanka - ethnology
Time Factors
Walking - physiology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
This study aimed to compare objectively recorded physical activity (PA) levels and walking steps among pregnant women. Cross-sectional data from a multiethnic cohort (n = 823) of pregnant women consisting of 44% from Western countries, 24% from South Asia, 14% from Middle East, and 18% from other countries. PA and steps were recorded by the activity monitor SenseWearâ„¢ Pro3 Armband. A total of 678 women were included in the analysis. Western women walked significantly more steps and had higher moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA) levels compared with South Asian women per weekday and weekend day. Interaction terms (P = 0.008) between ethnicity (Western vs South Asian) and parity, and education, respectively, were identified: having = 1 children was positively associated with steps during weekends in South Asians in contrast to Western women. Having
PubMed ID
23278771 View in PubMed
Less detail

[The obesity epidemics--do diet pills have a place in the treatment?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47810
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Jun 30;120(17):1997-2001
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-30-2000
Author
S. Tonstad
K I Birkeland
Author Affiliation
Preventiv kardiologi Medisinsk divisjon Ullevål sykehus, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Jun 30;120(17):1997-2001
Date
Jun-30-2000
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Obesity Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Appetite Depressants - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Cyclobutanes - administration & dosage - adverse effects
English Abstract
Fenfluramine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Humans
Lactones - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Leptin - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Obesity - drug therapy - prevention & control
Obesity, Morbid - drug therapy - prevention & control
Phentermine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Weight Loss - drug effects
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Many experts consider obesity a chronic disease that may require long-term therapy. A loss of 5-15% of body weight is associated with improvements in cardiovascular risk factors and morbidity. However, most studies show that the majority of patients who lose weight relapse. Patients may be unable to maintain a low energy intake when confronted with an almost limitless supply of food. Moreover, a number of physiological mechanisms favour a set point for body weight, that may be altered with anti-obesity drugs. MATERIAL AND RESULTS: In the current paper we describe actions and effects of current anti-obesity drugs. The centrally acting drug, sibutramine, is an adrenaline and serotonine re-uptake inhibitor which was recently approved in the USA for obesity. The USA, the European Union and Norway have approved orlistat, a pancreatic lipase inhibitor for weight reduction for up to two years. Patients must maintain a low fat intake in order to avoid gastrointestinal discomfort. In recent studies, orlistat and diet reduced body weight by 9% versus 6% on placebo and diet. No studies have documented long-term safety of anti-obesity drugs. INTERPRETATION: Treatment of a lifestyle-related disease like obesity with medications is controversial, however, such treatment may not differ substantially from treatment of type II diabetes, hyperlipidaemia or hypertension.
PubMed ID
11008533 View in PubMed
Less detail

8 records – page 1 of 1.