Skip header and navigation

8 records – page 1 of 1.

Contribution of incidence to increasing prevalence of multiple sclerosis in Alberta, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156535
Source
Mult Scler. 2008 Aug;14(7):872-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
S A Warren
L W Svenson
K G Warren
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. sharon.warren@ualberta.ca
Source
Mult Scler. 2008 Aug;14(7):872-9
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta - epidemiology
Child
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Registries
Sex Distribution
Abstract
Alberta Health Care Insurance Plan (AHCIP) data were used to calculate prevalence and incidence rates for multiple sclerosis (MS) in the general population of Alberta from 1990 to 2004. Multiple sclerosis prevalence rose steadily each year over this time period, from 217.6/100,000 individuals in 1990 to 357.6/100,000 in 2004. Multiple sclerosis incidence fluctuated with a slight increase from 1990 to 2004, at 20.9/100,000 and 23.9/100,000, respectively. Age-specific prevalence rates were higher between ages 30 and 60 in 2004 than in 1990. The pattern of age-specific incidence rates was similar in 1990 and 2004, with a slight shift toward diagnosis in younger years. Gender-specific prevalence rates were higher for females in both 1990 and 2004, with a greater increase in females (43%) than males (29%). Gender-specific incidence rates were higher for females than males in both years, but there was no differential increase in incidence by gender from 1990 to 2004. The 2004 Alberta MS prevalence rate remains among the highest reported worldwide. Both increasing incidence and longer duration have likely contributed to increasing MS prevalence in the province.
PubMed ID
18573834 View in PubMed
Less detail

Geographic and temporal distribution of mortality rates for multiple sclerosis in Canada, 1965-1994.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186807
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2003 Jan-Feb;22(1):75-81
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sharon Warren
K G Warren
Lawrence W Svenson
Donald P Schopflocher
Allyson Jones
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. sharon.warren@ualberta.ca
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2003 Jan-Feb;22(1):75-81
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Geography - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - mortality
Prevalence
Seasons
Sex Distribution
Time Factors
Abstract
Statistics Canada data were used to calculate multiple sclerosis (MS) mortality rates per 100,000 population in the Canadian provinces from 1965 to 1994. For the period 1965-1994, the highest average annual MS mortality rates were in Quebec (4.4) and Ontario (3.9), while the Western Provinces had an intermediate rate (2.1) and the Atlantic Provinces had the lowest rate (1.2). Female mortality rates exceeded male rates in each of the four regions. Average annual MS mortality rates in Canada overall fluctuated during the past 30 years, with rates of 3.4 in 1965-1969, 4.2 in 1970-1974, 3.2 in 1975-1979, 2.3 in 1980-1984, 2.8 in 1985-1989 and 3.9 in 1990-1994. Female mortality rates exceeded male rates during each 5-year period. The highest mortality rates for both genders were in the 65 years plus age group. Rates in the under 45 years age group have remained stable, while rates in both the 45-64 and 65 years plus age groups have fluctuated. There is no apparent relationship between prevalence and mortality rates among the Canadian provinces.
PubMed ID
12566957 View in PubMed
Less detail

How multiple sclerosis is related to animal illness, stress and diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243453
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1982 Feb 15;126(4):377-82, 385
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-1982
Author
S A Warren
K G Warren
S. Greenhill
M. Paterson
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1982 Feb 15;126(4):377-82, 385
Date
Feb-15-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alberta
Analysis of Variance
Animal Diseases - transmission
Animals
Data Collection
Diabetes Complications
Distemper - transmission
Dogs
Environmental Exposure
Female
Humans
Leisure Activities
Male
Multiple Sclerosis - etiology - genetics
Physical Exertion
Retrospective Studies
Risk
Stress, Psychological - complications
Abstract
At the University of Alberta's multiple sclerosis research clinic 100 patients with multiple sclerosis were matched to control patients for age, sex, race and zone of residence before the age of 15 years. Case and control subjects were interviewed and information was collected by questionnaire on factors that might play a role in the development of multiple sclerosis. The only factors found to be significantly associated with the development of this disorder were a history of leisure time spent in physical activities before the onset of symptoms, exposure to animal illness -- specifically canine distemper -- and a history of severe or prolonged emotional stress. The study also confirmed a familial predisposition to multiple sclerosis and suggested a relation between the disorder and a personal or family history of diabetes mellitus.
Notes
Cites: J Psychosom Res. 1967 Aug;11(2):213-86059863
Cites: J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 1968 Jun;31(3):226-315684026
Cites: Acta Neurol Scand. 1973;49(4):495-5014797983
Cites: Arch Neurol. 1974 Oct;31(4):267-724414737
Cites: Lancet. 1974 Nov 2;2(7888):1061-64138048
Cites: Proc R Soc Med. 1976 Aug;69(8):611-562366
Cites: Can J Neurol Sci. 1976 Nov;3(4):287-3011000412
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1977 Jul 9;117(1):27577190
Cites: JAMA. 1977 Aug 22;238(8):854577970
Cites: Lancet. 1977 Nov 12;2(8046):102972925
Cites: Ann Neurol. 1978 Feb;3(2):141-3655663
Cites: Lancet. 1978 Nov 25;2(8100):1127-982686
Cites: Neurology. 1978 Oct;28(10):978-87570667
Cites: Ann Neurol. 1979 Jan;5(1):6-21371519
Cites: Neurology. 1979 Jul;29(7):1027-9381969
Cites: Neurology. 1980 Jul;30(7 Pt 2):61-796993993
Cites: Can J Neurol Sci. 1981 Feb;8(1):35-97225955
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1980 Dec;34(4):240-527241023
Cites: Brain. 1951;74(2):191-23214858746
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1952 May 8;246(19):722-814929306
Cites: Q J Med. 1952 Apr;21(82):135-6714941968
Cites: Ulster Med J. 1954 Mar;23(Suppl. 2):29-9213238438
Cites: Brain. 1956 Dec;79(4):635-5413396068
Cites: Brain. 1963 Jun;86:315-3213976699
Cites: Arch Neurol. 1962 Oct;7:253-6314012308
Cites: Res Publ Assoc Res Nerv Ment Dis. 1950;28:236-4415413015
Cites: Res Publ Assoc Res Nerv Ment Dis. 1950;28:450-515413029
Cites: Res Publ Assoc Res Nerv Ment Dis. 1950;28:533-4715413035
Cites: Br Med J. 1950 Aug 19;2(4676):431-615434411
PubMed ID
7066795 View in PubMed
Less detail

Influence of gender on susceptibility to multiple sclerosis and age of onset in concordant sibships.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212775
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1996 Feb;25(1):142-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1996
Author
S A Warren
K G Warren
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1996 Feb;25(1):142-5
Date
Feb-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age of Onset
Alberta - epidemiology
Analysis of Variance
Chi-Square Distribution
Disease Susceptibility
Family Health
Female
Humans
Male
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Abstract
Research has produced conflicting findings about whether there is an excess of like-sexed pairs among concordant multiple sclerosis (MS) sibships. Although a positive correlation in onset age among sibling pairs overall has been reported, no data have been published describing age at onset correlations for like-sexed versus unlike-sexed pairs. The purpose of this study was to provide additional information on both issues.
Patients with an MS sibling were sought through the files of the University of Alberta MS clinic (Edmonton, Canada). The clinic neurologist either reviewed clinical/autopsy material or assessed relatives of index cases prior to accepting the relative as having MS. Pairs of siblings (excluding twins) were divided into (1) male-male pairs, (2) female-female pairs, and (3) female-male pairs.
A total of 62 concordant sibling pairs were identified. There were 33 like-sexed pairs (6 male-male/27 female-female) and 29 unlike-sexed pairs. The observed number of like-sexed pairs was not significantly different from the expected frequency using 2 x 2 chi2 analysis, where expected values represent the binomial distribution predicted from the frequency of each sex as determined by total number of males and females. The age at onset intraclass correlation coefficient was -0.09 for sibling pairs overall, -0.22 for like-sexed pairs and +0.02 for unlike-sexed pairs.
This study does not provide evidence for an association between disease susceptibility and gender in siblings concordant for MS; nor does it suggest that genetics plays a role in onset age.
PubMed ID
8666483 View in PubMed
Less detail

Parental ancestry and risk of multiple sclerosis in Alberta, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213457
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 1996 Jan-Feb;15(1):1-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
S. Warren
L. Svenson
S. Woodhead
K G Warren
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, Canada.
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 1996 Jan-Feb;15(1):1-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Ethnic Groups
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology
Parents
Risk factors
Abstract
Self-reported population ancestry data for the 19 census divisions (CDs) of Alberta, Canada, were correlated with multiple sclerosis (MS) prevalence rates in those divisions, for men and women separately; and parental ancestry was compared between a group of MS patients and controls attending the University of Alberta MS Clinic. At the CD level, there was a positive correlation between single Scandinavian ancestry and MS prevalence in men, but this was not confirmed in the case-control comparison. The case-control comparison indicated an excess risk of MS associated with single non-specific European as opposed to British ancestry in men only. When paternal versus maternal ancestry was considered separately, there was an excess risk of MS associated with non-specific European as opposed to British ancestry for both men and women, but on the father's side only. Aboriginal ancestry was negatively associated with MS prevalence at the CD level in both men and women; and no MS patients with aboriginal origin were among cases assembled through the MS clinic.
PubMed ID
8719043 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prevalence, incidence, and characteristics of multiple sclerosis in Westlock County, Alberta, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220318
Source
Neurology. 1993 Sep;43(9):1760-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1993
Author
S. Warren
K G Warren
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Neurology. 1993 Sep;43(9):1760-3
Date
Sep-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alberta - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology
Abstract
We report a prevalence study of multiple sclerosis (MS) in the town of Westlock and surrounding county of Westlock, in Alberta, Canada. The prevalence rate for clinically definite MS on January 1, 1991, was 200/100,000. The average annual incidence rates for patients living in the area at onset were 1.91/100,000 for 1950-1959, 2.85/100,000 for 1960-1969, 3.82/100,000 for 1970-1979, and 7.26/100,000 for 1980-1989. Forty-eight percent of the patients were relapsing-remitting. Sixty percent were still walking without assistance. The female-to-male ratio was 1.4:1. Mean current age was 47, age at onset 30, and duration of illness 18 years. The majority of patients (40%) experienced multiple symptom onset. Forty percent were of single ethnic origin (primarily British); the remainder were predominantly north European combinations. Twenty-four percent of patients reported another MS relative, six first-degree and one second-degree relative.
PubMed ID
8414027 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prevalence of multiple sclerosis in Barrhead County, Alberta, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224406
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 1992 Feb;19(1):72-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992
Author
S. Warren
K G Warren
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 1992 Feb;19(1):72-5
Date
Feb-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alberta
Employment
Family
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Rural Population
Sex Factors
Abstract
A prevalence study of multiple sclerosis (MS) was carried out in the town of Barrhead and surrounding county of Barrhead, in Alberta, Canada. The prevalence rate for clinically probable/definite multiple sclerosis on January 1, 1990 was 196/100,000. The average annual incidence rates for patients living in the area at onset were 1.31/100,000 for 1950-59, 4.97/100,000 for 1960-69, 3.77/100,000 for 1970-79, and 4.22/100,000 for 1980-89. Fifty percent of the patients were relapsing-remitting. Sixty percent were still walking without assistance. The female-to-male ratio was 1:1. Mean current age, age at onset and duration of illness were 49, 27 and 22 years respectively. The majority of patients (40%) experienced multiple symptom onset. Fifty percent were of single ethnic origin (either British or German); the rest were predominantly North European combinations. Forty percent of patients reported another MS relative. MS had affected the work status of 60% of the patients, 15% of whom were confined to an extended care centre.
PubMed ID
1562911 View in PubMed
Less detail

Risk factors by onset age in multiple sclerosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227042
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 1991;10(1):9-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
S. Warren
R. Cockerill
K G Warren
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 1991;10(1):9-17
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alberta - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Multiple Sclerosis - classification - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Social Environment
Abstract
Some investigators have suggested that there are different forms of multiple sclerosis (MS) based on onset age, and that each has a different etiology. 173 Canadian MS patients were matched to controls on age, gender, race and risk zone prior to age 15. Data were collected on: age at onset, gender, initial symptom, disability level, residence history and family background. Three onset age subgroups (early, intermediate and late) were derived. Matched-pair logistic regression analysis indicated that rural residence, use of well water and an MS family history distinguished between patients and controls overall, but showed no significant interaction with onset age. A family history of diabetes distinguished between patients and controls with evidence of age interaction, in that this risk factor decreased in importance as onset age increased.
PubMed ID
2062417 View in PubMed
Less detail

8 records – page 1 of 1.