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34 records – page 1 of 4.

3-Year follow-up of secondary chronic headaches: the Akershus study of chronic headache.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141854
Source
Eur J Pain. 2011 Feb;15(2):186-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Kjersti Aaseth
Ragnhild Berling Grande
Jurate Šaltyte Benth
Christofer Lundqvist
Michael Bjørn Russell
Author Affiliation
Head and Neck Research Group, Research Centre, Akershus University Hospital, 1478 Lørenskog, Norway. kjersti.aaseth@medisin.uio.no
Source
Eur J Pain. 2011 Feb;15(2):186-92
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Headache Disorders, Secondary - etiology - physiopathology
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Norway
Pain Measurement
Questionnaires
Rhinitis - complications
Severity of Illness Index
Sinusitis - complications
Abstract
The objective was to investigate the 3-year course of secondary chronic headaches (?15days per month for at least 3months) in the general population. An age and gender stratified random sample of 30,000 persons aged 30-44years from the general population received a mailed questionnaire. All with self-reported chronic headache, 517 in total, were interviewed by neurological residents. The questionnaire response rate was 71%. The rate of participation in the initial and follow-up interview was 74% (633/852) and 87% (83/95) respectively. The International Classification of Headache Disorders was used, and then in the next step the Cervicogenic Headache International Study Group and American Academy of Otolaryngology criteria were used in relation to cervicogenic headache (CEH) and headache attributed to chronic rhinosinusitis (HACRS). Of those followed-up, 40 had headache attributed to head and/or neck trauma (chronic posttraumatic headache), 0 had CEH and 0 had HACRS according to the ICHD-II criteria, while 18 had CEH according to the Cervicogenic Headache International Study Group's criteria, and 37 had HACRS according to the criteria of the American Academy of Otolaryngology. The headache index (frequency×intensity×duration) was significantly reduced from baseline to follow-up in chronic posttraumatic headache and HACRS, but not in CEH. We conclude that secondary chronic headaches seem to have various course dependent of subtype. Recognizing the different types of secondary chronic headaches is of importance because it might have management implications.
PubMed ID
20667753 View in PubMed
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Antipsychotic Drug Use Is Not Associated With Long-Term Mortality Risk in Norwegian Nursing Home Patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287422
Source
J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2016 May 01;17(5):464.e1-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-01-2016
Author
Geir Selbæk
Dag Aarsland
Clive Ballard
Knut Engedal
Ellen Melbye Langballe
Jurate Šaltyte Benth
Sverre Bergh
Source
J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2016 May 01;17(5):464.e1-7
Date
May-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mortality - trends
Norway
Nursing Homes
Proportional Hazards Models
Abstract
To assess the long-term mortality risk associated with antipsychotic drug (AP) use in nursing homes.
A longitudinal study with 5 assessments over a 75-month follow-up period.
A representative sample of nursing home patients in 4 Norwegian counties.
At baseline, 1163 patients were included. At the last follow-up, 98 patients were still alive.
Prevalent drug use at each assessment was registered. Level of dementia, neuropsychiatric symptoms, level of functioning, medical health, and use of restraints were recorded at each assessment. A Cox regression model with time-dependent psychotropic drug use as the main predictor was estimated and adjusted for confounders.
In unadjusted Cox regression, a lower mortality risk was associated with the use of other psychotropic drugs, but not APs, compared with nonusers. In the adjusted analysis, neither use of APs nor other psychiatric drugs was associated with increased mortality risk. Higher age, male gender, not being married, medical disease burden, lower level of functioning, more severe degree of dementia, and a higher number of drugs were all associated with increased mortality risk.
In this long-term study of nursing home patients, AP drug use was not associated with increased risk of mortality. This is in line with results from earlier studies of clinical samples, but contrasts with results from randomized controlled trials and registry-based studies. The findings should be interpreted with caution. Taking into account the modest benefit and high risk of adverse effects of AP drug use, nonpharmacological treatment remains the first-line treatment approach.
PubMed ID
26935533 View in PubMed
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Associations Between Quality of Life and Functioning in an Assertive Community Treatment Population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275432
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2015 Nov;66(11):1249-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
Hanne Clausen
Anne Landheim
Sigrun Odden
Kristin Sverdvik Heiervang
Hanne Kilen Stuen
Helen Killaspy
Jurate Šaltyte Benth
Torleif Ruud
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2015 Nov;66(11):1249-52
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - diagnosis
Community Mental Health Services
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - diagnosis
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - therapy
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Norway
Personal Satisfaction
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Quality of Life - psychology
Regression Analysis
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Level of functioning is positively associated with subjective quality of life for people with severe mental illness, but a detailed relationship between functioning and satisfaction with various life domains is largely unknown, and this gap prompted this study.
Demographic and clinical data were obtained from 149 patients engaged with 12 assertive community treatment teams in Norway. Multivariate regression analyses were used to explore associations between subjective quality of life and patient characteristics.
Analyses confirmed positive associations between quality of life and age, functioning, and weekly contact with family and friends and a negative association with anxiety and depressive symptoms. Positive associations between several areas of practical and social functioning and satisfaction with related life domains also were found.
Although a causal direction of the associations between functioning and life satisfaction has not been determined in this study, the positive findings might indicate that programs aiming to improve functioning could affect patients' quality of life.
PubMed ID
26234328 View in PubMed
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A cohort study of permanently reduced work ability in breast cancer patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125742
Source
J Cancer Surviv. 2012 Sep;6(3):345-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Beate Hauglann
Jurate Šaltyte Benth
Sophie D Fosså
Alv A Dahl
Author Affiliation
National Resource Center for Late Effects, Department of Oncology, Oslo University Hospital, Radiumhospitalet and University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. beate.hauglann@gmail.com
Source
J Cancer Surviv. 2012 Sep;6(3):345-56
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - mortality - pathology - psychology - rehabilitation
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Disabled Persons
Employment - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Grading
Neoplasm Staging
Norway
Patient Education as Topic
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Survival Rate
Survivors - psychology
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
The aims of this cohort study were to explore various longitudinal aspects of employment and disability pension due to permanently reduced work ability among women with breast cancer and to investigate the impact of breast cancer on income.
In a national register-based controlled cohort study from Norway, 1,548 women diagnosed with breast cancer (all stages) between 1992 and 1996 at the age 45-54 years and 1,548 cancer-free women matched for age, municipality and civil status were followed for up to 14 years. Medical data from the Cancer Registry of Norway were linked with longitudinal data on employment, social security benefits and socio-demography collected from other national official registries.
Compared to cancer-free controls, breast cancer patients were significantly more likely to receive disability pension (hazard ratio (HR) 2.7, 95% CI 2.3-3.2) after adjustment for unmatched socio-demographic variables (education, income and children
PubMed ID
22457217 View in PubMed
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A controlled cohort study of long-term income in colorectal cancer patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263612
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2014 Oct;22(10):2821-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Beate Hauglann
Jurate Saltyte Benth
Sophie D Fosså
Kjell M Tveit
Alv A Dahl
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2014 Oct;22(10):2821-30
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms
Female
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Abstract
The study aims to investigate long-term development in annual labor income (ALI) among patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) compared to individually matched cancer-free controls.
In a register-based cohort study based on data from Norwegian national registries, 752 patients diagnosed with CRC 1992-1996 at the age 45-54 years were observed annually up to 10 years post-diagnosis. Also, 752 individually matched controls were observed correspondingly. The relationship of CRC and ALI development was modeled by linear mixed model statistics.
CRC was associated with reduced ALI in females in the year of diagnosis, irrespective of extent of disease. From the year after diagnosis and onwards, ALI decreased in female patients and controls, most strongly in females with distant CRC, and also in males with regional and distant CRC. Five years after diagnosis, mean ALI was reduced by 22 % in females and 6 % in males with localized CRC. Corresponding numbers were 21 % in females and 11 % in males with regional CRC and 6 % reduction in female and less than 1 % reduction in male controls. After adjustment for post-diagnostic disability pension and days of employment, ALI developed similarly in male patients and controls, whereas CRC remained associated with reduced ALI in the year of diagnosis in females and throughout observation in females with distant CRC.
Except for males with localized cancer, CRC was associated with negative development in ALI in both sexes, varying by extent of disease. The work ability and income status of female CRC patients and males with metastasing disease should be checked during follow-up.
PubMed ID
24821364 View in PubMed
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A controlled cohort study of sickness absence and disability pension in colorectal cancer survivors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259520
Source
Acta Oncol. 2014 Jun;53(6):735-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Beate K Hauglann
Jurate Saltyte Benth
Sophie D Fosså
Kjell M Tveit
Alv A Dahl
Source
Acta Oncol. 2014 Jun;53(6):735-43
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Disability Evaluation
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Norway
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Return to Work - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Survivors - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To investigate long-term development of sickness absence and disability pension among colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors compared to matched cancer-free controls, and to assess to what degree socio-demographic and disease characteristics influence these outcomes.
In a register-based cohort study with data from the Cancer Registry of Norway and longitudinal data from other national registries, 740 patients with CRC diagnosed 1992-1996 at the age 45-54 years were observed up to 14 years post-diagnosis. Also 740 matched controls were observed over the same time period.
During the first year after diagnosis, 85% of the CRC survivors were on sick-leave at some point, compared to 19% of the controls. Among survivors with localized cancer, 21% were on sick-leave 12 months after diagnosis, versus 33% with regional, and 52% with distant cancer. Survivors with rectum cancer were more likely than colon cancer survivors to be on sick-leave the first year after diagnosis (OR 2.53, 95% CI 1.61-3.98). CRC survivors were at higher risk for disability pension (DP) than controls, depending on extent of disease. Hazard ratios for DP were 1.67 (95% CI 1.13-2.46) for survivors with localized cancer, 3.12 (95% CI 2.06-4.72) for regional, and 10.13 (95% CI 4.17-24.62) for distant cancer, respectively. In survivors, distant cancer, low level of education, not having children
PubMed ID
24345277 View in PubMed
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A controlled study of income development for breast cancer survivors in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260287
Source
J Cancer Surviv. 2014 Jun;8(2):239-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Jurate Šaltyte Benth
Fredrik A Dahl
Hilde Lurås
Alv A Dahl
Source
J Cancer Surviv. 2014 Jun;8(2):239-47
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - mortality - pathology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Income
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Norway
Registries
Survivors
Abstract
This study seeks to assess the impact of breast cancer on survivors' annual income at 1 to 13 years of follow-up.
A Norwegian registry-based dataset with a 13-year follow-up period was used. The dataset contained case-control pairs, where each pair consisted of one breast cancer case and a cancer-free control, matched for age, marital status, and municipality of residence. A mixed linear model was used to analyse the average income development for cases and controls adjusting for available demographic variables not used in the matching procedure, such as education level, immigration history, and number of children. Individual income was only considered relevant for cancer survivors, thus case-control pairs were censored upon death. Income development by stage of tumour at time of diagnosis was also assessed.
The income of breast cancer survivors had reduced immediately following diagnosis. At 1 year after diagnosis, income development between cases and controls became significantly different (p?=?0.006). Differences increased slightly but remained significant throughout the follow-up period. At 13 years after diagnosis, the estimated cumulative income loss for survivors was 39.403 € (p?
PubMed ID
24352869 View in PubMed
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The course of depressive symptoms as measured by the Cornell scale for depression in dementia over 74 months in 1158 nursing home residents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265767
Source
J Affect Disord. 2015 Apr 1;175:209-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2015
Author
Tom Borza
Knut Engedal
Sverre Bergh
Maria Lage Barca
Jurate Šaltyte Benth
Geir Selbæk
Source
J Affect Disord. 2015 Apr 1;175:209-16
Date
Apr-1-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Comorbidity
Dementia - epidemiology
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Nursing Homes
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Risk factors
Symptom Assessment
Abstract
Depressive symptoms and depression are common in nursing home residents. However, longitudinal studies of depression in nursing home residents are scarce and the sample sizes are small. This study aimed to investigate the course of depressive symptoms as measured by the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD) and associated explanatory demographic and clinical variables.
A longitudinal study over 74 months of 1158 nursing home residents aged 50 years and older from twenty six nursing homes in Norway where data was collected at five time points.
"Irritability" was the most prevalent, incident and persistent CSDD symptom. Compared with the baseline assessment, the likelihood of the mood symptoms "suicidal ideation," "pessimism" and "delusions" being present was lower at all subsequent assessments. This persisted after adjusting for the severity of dementia. The severity of depression as measured by CSDD decreased over 74 months when adjusting for relevant resident variables. Poorer physical health, higher number of medications, more severe dementia and use of antidepressants were associated with higher depression score.
Depression and dementia were not diagnosed according to standardized diagnostic criteria. The use of CSDD did not include a clinician?s interview with the patient. This could have implications for the generalization of the results.
This study adds important knowledge about the long-term course of depressive symptoms and depression for residents in nursing homes, and underlines the importance to pay close attention to the overlap between depression and dementia symptoms when evaluating depression in this setting.
PubMed ID
25638794 View in PubMed
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Dust exposure assessed by a job exposure matrix is associated with increased annual decline in FEV1: a 5-year prospective study of employees in Norwegian smelters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97814
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2010 Jun 1;181(11):1234-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-2010
Author
Helle Laier Johnsen
Siri M Hetland
Jurate Saltyte Benth
Johny Kongerud
Vidar Søyseth
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Akershus University Hospital, Postbox 75, N-1478 Lørenskog, Norway. helle.laier@dadlnet.dk
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2010 Jun 1;181(11):1234-40
Date
Jun-1-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Height
Dust
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Metallurgy
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Prospective Studies
Smoking - epidemiology
Spirometry
Vital Capacity
Abstract
RATIONALE: The relationship between dust exposure and annual decline in lung function among employees in the smelting industry is unknown. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between annual change in lung function and occupational dust exposure among workers in 15 Norwegian smelters. METHODS: All employees (n = 2,620) were examined annually for 5 years (11,335 health examinations). At each examination spirometry was performed and a respiratory questionnaire was completed. The smelters were grouped as follows: (1) ferrosilicon alloys (FeSi) and silicon metal (Si-metal); and (2) silicon manganese (SiMn), ferromanganese (FeMn), and ferrochromium (FeCr). A job exposure matrix was available on the basis of 2,619 personal dust exposure measurements. The association between lung function expressed as FEV(1) and FVC per squared height (height(2)) and dust exposure was investigated using multivariate linear mixed model analyses. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: The annual change in FEV(1)/height(2) (deltaFEV(1)) related to dust exposure in the FeSi/Si-metal and SiMn/FeMn/FeCr smelters was -0.42 (95% confidence interval, -0.95 to 0.11) and -1.1 (-2.1 to -0.12) (ml/m(2)) x (mg/m(3))(-1) x year(-1), respectively. The annual decline in FEV(1)/height(2) was 1.6 ml/m(2) (0.15 to 3.1) steeper in smokers than in nonsmokers. The median geometric mean of the time-weighted dust exposure concentration levels of the employees was 2.3 mg/m(3) in the FeSi/Si-metal smelters and 1.6 mg/m(3) in the SiMn/FeMn/FeCr smelters. Among nonsmokers, deltaFEV(1) was -0.86 (-1.6 to -0.10) and -1.1 (-2.5 to 0.25) (ml/m(2)) x (mg/m(3))(-1) x year(-1) in the FeSi/Si-metal and SiMn/FeMn/FeCr smelters, respectively. Thus, for a 1.80 m tall employee the annual decline in FEV(1) associated with average dust exposure was 5.7 ml/year in the SiMn/FeMn/FeCr smelters, and 6.4 ml/year for a nonsmoker in the FeSi/Si-metal smelters. CONCLUSIONS: In all smelters combined, the annual change in FEV(1) was negatively associated with increasing dust exposure. This association was also significant among workers in SiMn/FeMn/FeCr smelters and among nonsmokers in the FeSi/Si-metal smelters.
Notes
RefSource: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2010 Jun 1;181(11):1162-3
PubMed ID
20203247 View in PubMed
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The effect of person-centred dementia care to prevent agitation and other neuropsychiatric symptoms and enhance quality of life in nursing home patients: a 10-month randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107351
Source
Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2013;36(5-6):340-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Anne Marie Mork Rokstad
Janne Røsvik
Øyvind Kirkevold
Geir Selbaek
Jurate Saltyte Benth
Knut Engedal
Author Affiliation
Ageing and Health, Norwegian Centre for Research, Education and Service Development, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2013;36(5-6):340-53
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Dementia - complications - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Homes for the Aged - organization & administration
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Norway
Nursing Homes - organization & administration
Patient-Centered Care - methods - organization & administration
Psychomotor Agitation - etiology - prevention & control
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
We examined whether Dementia Care Mapping (DCM) or the VIPS practice model (VPM) is more effective than education of the nursing home staff about dementia (control group) in reducing agitation and other neuropsychiatric symptoms as well as in enhancing the quality of life among nursing home patients.
A 10-month three-armed cluster-randomized controlled trial compared DCM and VPM with control. Of 624 nursing home patients with dementia, 446 completed follow-up assessments. The primary outcome was the change on the Brief Agitation Rating Scale (BARS). Secondary outcomes were changes on the 10-item version of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire (NPI-Q), the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD) and the Quality of Life in Late-Stage Dementia (QUALID) scale.
Changes in the BARS score did not differ significantly between the DCM and the control group or between the VPM and the control group after 10 months. Positive differences were found for changes in the secondary outcomes: the NPI-Q sum score as well as the subscales NPI-Q agitation and NPI-Q psychosis were in favour of both interventions versus control, the QUALID score was in favour of DCM versus control and the CSDD score was in favour of VPM versus control.
This study failed to find a significant effect of both interventions on the primary outcome. Positive effects on the secondary outcomes indicate that the methods merit further investigation.
PubMed ID
24022375 View in PubMed
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34 records – page 1 of 4.