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Comparing rock-inhabiting microbial communities in different rock types from a high arctic polar desert.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299360
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2018 06 01; 94(6):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-01-2018
Author
Yong-Hoe Choe
Mincheol Kim
Jusun Woo
Mi Jung Lee
Jong Ik Lee
Eun Ju Lee
Yoo Kyung Lee
Author Affiliation
Korea Polar Research Institute, 26 Songdomirae-ro, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 21990, Republic of Korea.
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2018 06 01; 94(6):
Date
06-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Antarctic Regions
Arctic Regions
Bacteria - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Fungi - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Geologic Sediments - microbiology
Microbiota
Norway
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
RNA, Ribosomal, 28S - genetics
Soil Microbiology
Svalbard
Abstract
Although rocks are habitable places for microbes in extreme environments, microbial diversity in these lithic environments is still poorly understood. The diversity and abundance of rock-inhabiting microbial communities in different types of rock in Svalbard, Norwegian High Arctic were examined using NGS sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes and fungal 28S rRNA genes. Compositions of both bacterial and fungal communities varied across different rock types: sandstone, limestone, basalt, granite and travertine. Bacterial communities were dominated by Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Bacteroidetes and Acidobacteria. Fungal communities consisted of Eurotiomycetes, Lecanoromycetes, Dothideomycetes and Leotiomycetes. Both bacterial and fungal community compositions were significantly correlated with the geochemical characteristics of rocks. Bacterial communities were considerably correlated with the rock elements such as Mg and Ca. Fungal communities were considerably correlated with Fe. Interestingly, many dominant bacterial and fungal operational taxonomic units in the investigated rocks from the study area were closely affiliated to those found in other cold regions such as Alpine area, Arctic and Antarctica, suggesting that environmental constraints such as cold temperature may lead to convergence in microbial community composition. These results confirm that rocks in cold environments act as reservoirs of diverse bacteria and fungi, which may improve our understanding of lithic microbial ecology in the cold desert.
PubMed ID
29688499 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparing rock-inhabiting microbial communities in different rock types from a high arctic polar desert.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291405
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2018 Jun 01; 94(6):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-01-2018
Author
Yong-Hoe Choe
Mincheol Kim
Jusun Woo
Mi Jung Lee
Jong Ik Lee
Eun Ju Lee
Yoo Kyung Lee
Author Affiliation
Korea Polar Research Institute, 26 Songdomirae-ro, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 21990, Republic of Korea.
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2018 Jun 01; 94(6):
Date
Jun-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Although rocks are habitable places for microbes in extreme environments, microbial diversity in these lithic environments is still poorly understood. The diversity and abundance of rock-inhabiting microbial communities in different types of rock in Svalbard, Norwegian High Arctic were examined using NGS sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes and fungal 28S rRNA genes. Compositions of both bacterial and fungal communities varied across different rock types: sandstone, limestone, basalt, granite and travertine. Bacterial communities were dominated by Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Bacteroidetes and Acidobacteria. Fungal communities consisted of Eurotiomycetes, Lecanoromycetes, Dothideomycetes and Leotiomycetes. Both bacterial and fungal community compositions were significantly correlated with the geochemical characteristics of rocks. Bacterial communities were considerably correlated with the rock elements such as Mg and Ca. Fungal communities were considerably correlated with Fe. Interestingly, many dominant bacterial and fungal operational taxonomic units in the investigated rocks from the study area were closely affiliated to those found in other cold regions such as Alpine area, Arctic and Antarctica, suggesting that environmental constraints such as cold temperature may lead to convergence in microbial community composition. These results confirm that rocks in cold environments act as reservoirs of diverse bacteria and fungi, which may improve our understanding of lithic microbial ecology in the cold desert.
PubMed ID
29688499 View in PubMed
Less detail

A review of pediatric dentistry program websites: what are applicants learning about our programs?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143169
Source
J Dent Educ. 2010 Jun;74(6):654-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Jenn-Yih Lin
Jung Lee
Bo Davidson
Kara Farquharson
Cheryl Shaul
Sara Kim
Author Affiliation
Box 357136, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA 98195-7136, USA. linjy@u.washington.edu
Source
J Dent Educ. 2010 Jun;74(6):654-60
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Career Choice
Cross-Sectional Studies
Education, Dental, Graduate - economics
Endodontics - education
Fellowships and Scholarships
General Practice, Dental - education
Humans
Internet
Internship and Residency - economics
Licensure, Dental
Marketing
Orthodontics - education
Pediatric Dentistry - economics - education
Personnel Selection
Prosthodontics - education
Societies, Dental
Students, Dental
Surgery, Oral - education
United States
Abstract
The purpose of this study was twofold: 1) to examine website content provided by U.S. and Canadian pediatric dentistry residency programs, and 2) to understand aspects of program websites that dental students report to be related to their interests. Sixty-eight program websites were reviewed by five interprofessional evaluators. A thirty-six-item evaluation form was organized into 1) program descriptive items listed on the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) website (n=21); 2) additional program descriptive items not listed on the AAPD website but of interest (n=9); and 3) items related to website interface design (n=5). We also surveyed fifty-four dental students regarding their interest in various aspects of program descriptions. The results of this study suggest that pediatric dentistry residency programs in general tend to provide identical or less information than what is listed on the AAPD website. The majority of respondents (76 percent) reported that residency program websites would be their first source of information about advanced programs. The greatest gap between the available website information and students' interests exists in these areas: stipend and tuition information, state licensure, and program strengths. Pediatric dentistry residency programs underutilize websites as a marketing and recruitment tool and should incorporate more information in areas of students' priority interests.
PubMed ID
20516305 View in PubMed
Less detail

Woodruff v. Covington--physicians associated with federally funded health-care programs may not be immune to claims brought under Federal Tort Claims Act.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172320
Source
J Law Med Ethics. 2005;33(3):622-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005