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Advanced practice nursing in Canada: overview of a decision support synthesis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135441
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2010 Dec;23 Spec No 2010:15-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Alba DiCenso
Ruth Martin-Misener
Denise Bryant-Lukosius
Ivy Bourgeault
Kelley Kilpatrick
Faith Donald
Sharon Kaasalainen
Patricia Harbman
Nancy Carter
Sandra Kioke
Julia Abelson
R James McKinlay
Dianna Pasic
Brandi Wasyluk
Julie Vohra
Renee Charbonneau-Smith
Author Affiliation
Ontario Training Centre in Health Services & Policy Research, Nursing and Clinical Epidemiology & Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON.
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2010 Dec;23 Spec No 2010:15-34
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advanced Practice Nursing - classification - methods - organization & administration
Canada
Decision Support Systems, Clinical - classification - organization & administration
Focus Groups
Health Care Surveys
Health Policy
Humans
Leadership
Nurse Clinicians - classification - organization & administration
Nurse Practitioners - classification - organization & administration
Periodicals as Topic - statistics & numerical data
Publishing - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The objective of this decision support synthesis was to identify and review published and grey literature and to conduct stakeholder interviews to (1) describe the distinguishing characteristics of clinical nurse specialist (CNS) and nurse practitioner (NP) role definitions and competencies relevant to Canadian contexts, (2) identify the key barriers and facilitators for the effective development and utilization of CNS and NP roles and (3) inform the development of evidence-based recommendations for the individual, organizational and system supports required to better integrate CNS and NP roles into the Canadian healthcare system and advance the delivery of nursing and patient care services in Canada. Four types of advanced practice nurses (APNs) were the focus: CNSs, primary healthcare nurse practitioners (PHCNPs), acute care nurse practitioners (ACNPs) and a blended CNS/NP role. We worked with a multidisciplinary, multijurisdictional advisory board that helped identify documents and key informant interviewees, develop interview questions and formulate implications from our findings. We included 468 published and unpublished English- and French-language papers in a scoping review of the literature. We conducted interviews in English and French with 62 Canadian and international key informants (APNs, healthcare administrators, policy makers, nursing regulators, educators, physicians and other team members). We conducted four focus groups with a total of 19 APNs, educators, administrators and policy makers. A multidisciplinary roundtable convened by the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation formulated evidence-informed policy and practice recommendations based on the synthesis findings. This paper forms the foundation for this special issue, which contains 10 papers summarizing different dimensions of our synthesis. Here, we summarize the synthesis methods and the recommendations formulated at the roundtable.
PubMed ID
21478685 View in PubMed
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Exploring adolescent complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) use in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159302
Source
J Interprof Care. 2008 Jan;22(1):45-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Chris Patterson
Heather Arthur
Charlotte Noesgaard
Patricia Caldwell
Julie Vohra
Chera Francoeur
Marilyn Swinton
Author Affiliation
McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. cpatter@mcmaster.ca
Source
J Interprof Care. 2008 Jan;22(1):45-55
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adolescent Health Services
Adult
Attitude to Health
Canada
Complementary Therapies - psychology - utilization
Female
Humans
Male
Qualitative Research
Abstract
A qualitative study using a grounded theory approach investigated adolescents' perceptions about complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) use. Adolescents, attending a clinic at the Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine, were interviewed after receiving ethics approval. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews. The decision of adolescents to use CAM was based within the context of their world and how it shaped influencing factors. Factors that influenced adolescents' decision to use CAM were identified as certain personality traits, culture, media, social contacts and the ability of CAM providers to develop therapeutic relationships. The barriers and benefits of CAM use influenced evaluation of choices. The importance of barriers in limiting freedom of choice in health care decisions should be investigated by practitioners as they provide care to adolescents. Health care planning for integrative models of care requires determining the "right" blend of expertise by knowing interprofessional boundaries, determining mixed skill sets to provide the essential services and ensuring appropriate regulation that allows practitioners to use their full scope of practice.
PubMed ID
18202985 View in PubMed
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