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Adding a low-dose antihypertensive regimen would substantially improve the control of hypertension and reduce cardiovascular morbidity among uncomplicated hypertensive patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134219
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2012 Aug;19(4):712-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Teemu L Ahola
Ilkka M Kantola
Juhani Mäki
Antti Reunanen
Antti M Jula
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, Turku/Helsinki, Finland. teemu.ahola@pp3.inet.fi
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2012 Aug;19(4):712-22
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - administration & dosage
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Chi-Square Distribution
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Therapy, Combination
Drug Utilization
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Physician's Practice Patterns
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prevalence
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To assess the utilization of antihypertensive drugs among uncomplicated hypertensive patients in Finland between 2000 and 2006 and to calculate the achievable reduction in cardiovascular morbidity, with intensified antihypertensive treatment.
From the databases of the Social Insurance Institution of Finland, 428,986 treated hypertensives without diabetes or cardiac disease (further named uncomplicated hypertensives) in 2000 and 591,206 in 2006, respectively, were identified. In addition, from the Health 2000 survey representing the whole Finnish adult population, 729 uncomplicated hypertensives were determined to assess their characteristics and control of hypertension. Applying Law's meta-analyses we calculated the reduction of blood pressure (BP) by intensifying the treatment with low-dose antihypertensive regimens for those with a BP =140/90?mmHg.
The nationwide data suggests a relative overuse of beta-blockers. Combination antihypertensive treatment increased relatively 8%, while at least three drug combinations increased from 19.8% to 21.6% between 2000 and 2006. However, calculated prevalence of controlled BP (
PubMed ID
21609976 View in PubMed
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High and increasing prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease in Finland with a clear North-South difference.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119088
Source
J Crohns Colitis. 2013 Aug;7(7):e256-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Airi Jussila
Lauri J Virta
Veikko Salomaa
Juhani Mäki
Antti Jula
Martti A Färkkilä
Author Affiliation
Department of Gastroenterology and Alimentary Tract Surgery, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland. airi.jussila@fimnet.fi
Source
J Crohns Colitis. 2013 Aug;7(7):e256-62
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - epidemiology
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Poisson Distribution
Prevalence
Registries
Vitamin D Deficiency - epidemiology
Abstract
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) prevalence has increased and a North-South gradient has been reported. We estimated the nationwide prevalence of IBD, ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) in 1993, and prevalence of IBD in 2008, and assessed the geographical distribution of IBD in Finland. In addition, we investigated the vitamin D levels in a study population from a large, nationally representative health examination survey, the Health 2000 Survey.
The register study for prevalences included all patients who had special reimbursement of medications for IBD in the years 1993 (n=10,958) and 2008 (31,703). The study for D-vitamin measurement consisted of 6134 persons who had participated in the Health 2000 Survey.
The nationwide point prevalence of IBD in 1993 was 216 per 100,000 inhabitants, and 595 in 2008. In 1993, the prevalence of UC (177) was fourfold higher than the prevalence of CD (38). The prevalence of IBD and UC in Finland increased from South to North. For CD, no geographical variation could be demonstrated. In the Health 2000 survey, vitamin D levels were lower in Northern than in Southern Finland.
Finland belongs to high prevalence area of IBD and this prevalence has increased nearly threefold during the past 15 years. A clear North-South gradient has been shown for IBD and UC, but not for CD. Slightly lower vitamin D levels in Northern Finland may be associated with the observed higher prevalence of IBD there.
Notes
Comment In: J Crohns Colitis. 2014 Aug 1;8(8):90224491517
PubMed ID
23140840 View in PubMed
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Individual-level measures of social capital as predictors of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality: a population-based prospective study of men and women in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162293
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2007;22(9):589-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Markku T Hyyppä
Juhani Mäki
Olli Impivaara
Arpo Aromaa
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Functional Capacity, National Public Health Institute, Peltolantie 3, Turku 20720, Finland. markku.hyyppa@ktl.fi
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2007;22(9):589-97
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Social Support
Abstract
Individual-level social capital was assessed for prediction of mortality in a nationally representative study population aged 30-99 years at the baseline. A total of 90% of the original sample had participated in a comprehensive health examination (Mini-Finland Health Survey) in 1978-1980. After the first 5 years of the 24-year follow-up period, 1,196 of 3,014 men and 1,280 of 3,689 women died. Individual-level social capital was determined by factor analysis that revealed three factors: residential stability, leisure participation and interpersonal trust. Factor analysis showed a gender difference in leisure social participation. All-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality were analyzed using Cox proportional hazard models. Adjusted for demographic, life style and biological risk factors, and for health and socio-economic status, leisure participation was associated with reduced all-cause mortality in men (hazard ratio, HR: 0.94; 95% confidence interval, CI: 0.89-1.00). This association seems to be related to economic status in men. Age modifies the effect of interpersonal trust on all-cause mortality in men. In women, leisure participation (HR: 0.96; 95% CI: 0.91-1.00) and interpersonal trust (HR: 0.69; 95% CI: 0.51-0.93) predicted all-cause mortality, and the latter also cardiovascular mortality (HR: 0.93; 95% CI: 0.86-1.00). The associations between individual-level social capital and mortality are gender- and age-related. Understanding the gender and age perspectives appears to be essential for better insight into the interrelations between social capital and health.
PubMed ID
17653604 View in PubMed
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Leisure participation predicts survival: a population-based study in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171597
Source
Health Promot Int. 2006 Mar;21(1):5-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
  1 document  
Author
Markku T Hyyppä
Juhani Mäki
Olli Impivaara
Arpo Aromaa
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Peltolantie 3, FIN-20720 Turku, Finland. markku.hyyppa@ktl.fi
Source
Health Promot Int. 2006 Mar;21(1):5-12
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Publication Type
Article
File Size
90311
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Leisure Activities
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Proportional Hazards Models
Survival Analysis
Abstract
The authors study whether leisure participation is an independent predictor of survival over 20 years. Of the nationally representative sample of 8000 adult Finns (Mini-Finland Health Survey), aged >or=30 years, the cohort of 30-59 years (n 5087) was chosen for the Cox proportional survival analyses. The sum score of leisure participation was divided in quartiles (the lowest quartile = scarce = 0-6), two intermediate quartiles = 7-11 and the highest quartile = abundant = 12-21). Adjusted for statistically significant covariates (age, tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption, obesity, self-rated health and diagnosed chronic diseases), and with scarce participation as the reference, the hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the risk of death were 0.80, 0.67-0.95 (intermediate) and 0.66, 0.52-0.84 (abundant) for men. The association was insignificant in women with good health. The results show that leisure participation predicts survival in middle-aged Finnish men and its effect is independent of demographic features, of health status and of several other health-related factors. The beneficial effect emphasizes the significance of leisure activities for the promotion of men's health.
PubMed ID
16338981 View in PubMed
Documents
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Return to work after first myocardial infarction in 1991-1996 in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177416
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2004 Dec;14(4):350-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Helena Hämäläinen
Juhani Mäki
Lauri Virta
Ilmo Keskimäki
Markku Mähönen
Vladislav Moltchanov
Veikko Salomaa
Author Affiliation
Social Insurance Institution, Research Department, Turku, Finland.
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2004 Dec;14(4):350-3
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Cause of Death
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Insurance, Disability - utilization
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - economics - epidemiology - mortality
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Retirement - economics - statistics & numerical data
Sex Distribution
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Social Security - utilization
Abstract
A substantial number of myocardial infarctions (MI) occur at working age. It is, however, insufficiently well known how many of these patients return to work after their MI.
Sources of information were the Hospital Discharge Register, the Causes of Death Register and the registers for social security benefits. Availability for the labour market was used as the return to work criterion. Altogether 10,244 persons (8,733 men, 1,511 women) aged 35-59 years had their first MI or coronary death during 1991-1994 in Finland. Persons who survived for 28 days and were not on pension at the time of MI were included in a two-year follow-up.
Twenty-nine per cent of patients were already pensioned at the time of their first MI. Of the patients not pensioned at the time of their MI, 4,929 were alive two years after the event. Of them, 38% of men and 40% of women received disability pension, 3% of both genders were on sick leave and 1% of both genders were on unemployment pension. The remainder, 58% of men and 56% of women, did not receive any of these benefits, thus, being available to the labour force.
Nearly one-third of persons having their first MI at working age were already out of the labour force at the time of their MI. Of those who were not pensioned and who survived the event, slightly more than half were available to the labour market two years later.
PubMed ID
15542868 View in PubMed
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Rorschach Comprehensive System data for a sample of 343 adults from Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160035
Source
J Pers Assess. 2007;89 Suppl 1:S57-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Carl-Erik Mattlar
Camilla Forsander
Anette Carlsson
Laila Norrlund
Paivi Vesala
Tarja Leppanen
Ann-Sofi Oist
Juhani Maki
Erkki Alanen
Author Affiliation
The Research and Development Unit of the Social Insurance Institution, Turku, Finland. ce.mattlar@netikka.fi
Source
J Pers Assess. 2007;89 Suppl 1:S57-60
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis
Mental health
Middle Aged
Personality
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Reference Values
Reproducibility of Results
Research Design - standards
Rorschach Test - statistics & numerical data
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This article combines Rorschach Comprehensive System (CS; Exner, 1990, 1993) data from four projects conducted in Finland between 1990 and 1995. The projects studied a stratified random sample of Finnish nonpatients, a cohort of twins, a group of elderly men, and a random sample collected to investigate sleep difficulties. The 343 records from these four studies provide a representative survey of Rorschach responding throughout the Finnish population.
PubMed ID
18039170 View in PubMed
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Social participation and health in a community rich in stock of social capital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71188
Source
Health Educ Res. 2003 Dec;18(6):770-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Markku T Hyyppä
Juhani Mäki
Author Affiliation
Research Department, Social Insurance Institution of Finland, 20720 Turku, Finland. markku.hyyppa@kela.fi
Source
Health Educ Res. 2003 Dec;18(6):770-9
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Comparative Study
Ethnic groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Health status
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Language
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Patient Participation
Social Desirability
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - ethnology
Abstract
In Finland, members of the Swedish-speaking minority, many of whom live in the province of Ostrobothnia, intermingle with the Finnish-speaking majority. Although the two language communities are quite similar to each other in most societal respects, including socioeconomic status, education and use of health services, significant disparities have been reported in the morbidity, disability and mortality between the Swedish-speaking minority and the Finnish-speaking majority. Since the population genetic, ecological and socioeconomic circumstances are equal, Swedish speakers' longer active life is difficult to explain by conventional health-related risk factors. A great deal of health inequality (between the language groups) seems to derive from uneven distribution of social capital, i.e. the Swedish-speaking community holds a higher amount of social capital that is associated with their well-being and health. Factor analysis revealed four patterns of social capital measures, i.e. voluntary associational activity, friendship network, religious involvement and hobby club activity, of which associational activity, friendship network and religious involvement were significantly associated with good self-rated health. Also, trustful friendship network, hobby club activity and religious involvement as well as avoidance of intoxication-prone drinking behavior were significantly more frequent among the individuals of the Swedish-speaking community. We suggest that health promotion should seek ways of working which would encourage social participation.
PubMed ID
14654508 View in PubMed
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Vitamin D status and common risk factors for bone fragility as determinants of quantitative ultrasound variables in a nationally representative population sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151802
Source
Bone. 2009 Jul;45(1):119-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Maarit Kauppi
Olli Impivaara
Juhani Mäki
Markku Heliövaara
Jukka Marniemi
Jukka Montonen
Antti Jula
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Functional Capacity, National Public Health Institute, Turku, Finland. maarit.kauppi@thl.fi
Source
Bone. 2009 Jul;45(1):119-24
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Confidence Intervals
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Finland
Fractures, Bone - blood - ultrasonography
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Abstract
Calcaneal quantitative ultrasound (QUS) can predict bone strength and fracture risk. Bone fragility has no single cause but results from a complex interplay of several etiologic or contributing factors. Vitamin D is essential for bone health even though it is still unclear how much of this vitamin is required to maintain bone strength and prevent fractures. Measurements of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [S-25(OH)D] have indicated a high prevalence of inadequate vitamin D status in a number of studies mostly based on selected study populations. The objective of this study was to examine the associations between S-25(OH)D, common risk factors for bone fragility, and QUS variables in a large unselected population sample. The study population consisted of 2736 men and 3299 women from a nationally representative population sample, aged 30 years or over. Information on lifestyle was elicited by means of interviews and questionnaires. Body fat mass was estimated using an impedance-meter. S-25(OH)D was measured by radioimmunoassay. Calcaneal QUS was performed on the Hologic Sahara apparatus recording broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) and speed of sound (SOS). The potential determinants of BUA and SOS were analysed using separate multiple linear regression models for men and women. S-25(OH)D proved to be an independent determinant of BUA (P
PubMed ID
19328875 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.