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23 records – page 1 of 3.

Circumpolar health research under the umbrella of the International Polar Year.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173966
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Apr;64(2):110-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005

Cold-related cardiorespiratory symptoms among subjects with and without hypertension: the National FINRISK Study 2002.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259197
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2014 Apr;24(2):237-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Tiina M Ikäheimo
Taru Lehtinen
Riitta Antikainen
Jari Jokelainen
Simo Näyhä
Juhani Hassi
Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
Tiina Laatikainen
Pekka Jousilahti
Jouni J K Jaakkola
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2014 Apr;24(2):237-43
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - complications - epidemiology
Cold Temperature
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension - complications - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
Exposure to cold weather increases blood pressure (BP) and may aggravate the symptoms and influence the prognosis of subjects with a diagnosis of hypertension. We tested the hypothesis that subjects with hypertension alone or in combination with another cardiovascular disease (CVD) experience cold-related cardiorespiratory symptoms more commonly than persons without hypertension. This information is relevant for proper treatment and could serve as an indicator for predicting wintertime morbidity and mortality.
A self-administered questionnaire inquiring of cold-related symptoms was obtained from 6591 men and women aged 25-74 yrs of the FINRISK Study 2002 population. BP was measured in association with clinical examinations. Symptom prevalence was compared between subjects with diagnosed hypertensive disease with (n = 395) or without (n = 764) another CVD, untreated diagnosed hypertension (n = 1308), measured high BP (n = 1070) and a reference group (n = 2728) with normal BP.
Hypertension in combination with another CVD was associated with increased cold-related dyspnoea (men: adjusted odds ratio 3.94, 95% confidence interval 2.57-6.02)/women: 4.41, 2.84-6.86), cough (2.64, 1.62-4.32/4.26, 2.60-6.99), wheezing (2.51, 1.42-4.43/;3.73, 2.08-6.69), mucus excretion (1.90, 1.24-2.91/2.53, 1.54-4.16), chest pain (22.5, 9.81-51.7/17.7, 8.37-37.5) and arrhythmias (43.4, 8.91-211/8.99, 3.99-20.2), compared with the reference group. Both diagnosed treated hypertension and untreated hypertension and measured high BP resulted in increased cardiorespiratory symptoms during the cold season.
Hypertension alone and together with another CVD is strongly associated with cold-related cardiorespiratory symptoms. As these symptoms may predict adverse health events, hypertensive patients need customized care and advice on how to cope with cold weather.
PubMed ID
23794677 View in PubMed
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Cold-related respiratory symptoms in the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96627
Source
Clin Respir J. 2010 Jul;4(3):176-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Terttu Harju
Tiina Mäkinen
Simo Näyhä
Tiina Laatikainen
Pekka Jousilahti
Juhani Hassi
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. terttu.harju@oulu.fi
Source
Clin Respir J. 2010 Jul;4(3):176-85
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Cold-related respiratory symptoms are common among northern populations, especially among people suffering from respiratory diseases. However, the prevalence of such symptoms in the general population and the threshold temperatures at which the symptoms start to emerge are poorly known. OBJECTIVES: The present study determined the prevalence and threshold temperatures of self-reported respiratory symptoms related to cold, separately for healthy people and those with respiratory disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Six thousand five hundred ninety-one men and women aged 25 years-74 years from the national FINRISK study were queried about cold-related respiratory symptoms. The results were expressed as age-adjusted prevalence figures and coefficients from multivariate regressions. RESULTS: Cold-related respiratory symptoms were more often reported by people with asthma (men 69%/women 78%) and by subjects with chronic bronchitis (65%/76%) than the healthy subjects (18%/21%). A binomial regression showed an increase of symptom prevalence by age and excesses of 4%, 50% and 21% units because of female sex, asthma and chronic bronchitis, respectively. The reported threshold temperature for cold-related symptoms was -14 degrees C for males and -15 degrees C for females, and it showed some increase by age (0 degrees C-5 degrees C), asthma (2 degrees C) and chronic bronchitis (3 degrees C). The threshold temperature for mucus production was exceptional as it decreased by age (2 degrees C-5 degrees C) and asthma (2 degrees C). The effects of smoking and education were marginal. CONCLUSION: Cold-related respiratory symptoms are common in patients with chronic respiratory diseases, but they start to emerge at relatively low temperatures. In a cold climate, the cold-related symptoms may have an impact on the health-related quality of life.
PubMed ID
20565497 View in PubMed
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Does living in a cold climate or recreational skiing increase the risk for obstructive respiratory diseases or symptoms?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15247
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2003 May;62(2):142-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
Jyrki-Tapani Kotaniemi
Jari Latvala
Bo Lundbäck
Anssi Sovijärvi
Juhani Hassi
Kjell Larsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Päijät-Häme Central Hospital, Lahti, Finland. jyrki.kotaniemi@phks.fi
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2003 May;62(2):142-57
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cold Climate
Dyspnea - epidemiology - etiology
Exertion
Female
Humans
Lung Diseases, Obstructive - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Skiing
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Respiratory symptoms and obstructive pulmonary diseases experienced during exercise and in cold weather were analysed in a large postal questionnaire study of a general adult population living in a cold climate. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of shortness of breath (SOB) during exercise, or in cold weather, and to find out if the risks (odds ratio=OR) for asthma, chronic bronchitis, or SOB during exercise, or in cold weather, were affected by recreational cross-country skiing, or by outdoor work in a cold climate. RESULTS: Of the 7937 invited persons, 84% responded; 876 of them were outdoor workers and 1497 were recreational cross-country skiers. Of the non-smoking responders, asthmatic subjects had the highest prevalence of SOB during exercise in cold weather (78%-82%), but allergic and bronchitic persons also had significantly higher prevalence rates (22%-38% and 27%-59%, respectively) than healthy persons (10%-19%). In all categories, the prevalence of SOB was significantly higher among current smokers than among ex- or non-smokers. Risk factor analysis revealed increased risks for respiratory conditions among those who had a family history of obstructive airway disease, or allergy. Skiers did not have a significantly increased risk for asthma, or respiratory symptoms. Among outdoor workers the risk for SOB during exercise in cold weather, OR 1.23 (CI 1.03-1.47), and for chronic bronchitis, OR 1.77 (CI 1.21-2.60), was higher than among indoor workers. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, the risk for chronic bronchitis and bronchitic symptoms was elevated among outdoor workers, but not among regular recreational cross-country skiers, and the risk for asthma was not significantly elevated by regular exercising, or by working in a cold climate.
PubMed ID
12862178 View in PubMed
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Effect of repeated exposures to cold on cognitive performance in humans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57224
Source
Physiol Behav. 2006 Jan 30;87(1):166-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-30-2006
Author
Tiina M Mäkinen
Lawrence A Palinkas
Dennis L Reeves
Tiina Pääkkönen
Hannu Rintamäki
Juhani Leppäluoto
Juhani Hassi
Author Affiliation
Centre for Arctic Medicine, Thule Institute, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014, Finland. tiina.makinen@oulu.fi
Source
Physiol Behav. 2006 Jan 30;87(1):166-76
Date
Jan-30-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acclimatization - physiology
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Body Temperature - physiology
Body Temperature Regulation - physiology
Cognition - physiology
Cold
Comparative Study
Humans
Hypothermia - physiopathology
Learning - physiology
Male
Memory - physiology
Mental Processes - physiology
Problem Solving - physiology
Reaction Time - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Abstract
The effects of repeated exposure to cold temperature on cognitive performance were examined in 10 male subjects who were exposed to control (25 degrees C) and cold (10 degrees C) conditions on 10 successive days. A cognitive test battery (ANAM-ICE) was administered each day to assess complex and simple cognitive functioning accuracy, efficiency and response time. Rectal (T(rect)) and skin temperatures, thermal sensations, metabolic rate (M) and cardiovascular reactivity were also recorded. With the used cold exposure, inducing cold sensations and discomfort, superficial skin cooling (6-7 degrees C) and a slightly lowered T(rect) (0.4 degrees C) we observed three distinct patterns of cognitive performance: 1) negative, reflected in increased response times and decreased accuracy and efficiency; 2) positive, reflected in decreased response time and increased efficiency; and 3) mixed, reflected in a pattern of increases in both accuracy and response time and decreases in efficiency, and a pattern of decreases in both accuracy and response time. T(rect), thermal sensations, diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and heart rate (HR) were independent predictors of decreased accuracy, but also decreased response time. Cognitive performance efficiency was significantly improved and response times shorter over the 10-d period both under control and cold exposures suggesting a learning effect. However, the changes in cognitive performance over the 10-d period did not differ markedly between control and cold, indicating that the changes in the thermal responses did not improve performance. The results suggest that cold affects cognitive performance negatively through the mechanisms of distraction and both positively and negatively through the mechanism of arousal.
PubMed ID
16309719 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of the thermal insulation of clothing of infants sleeping outdoors in Northern winter.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100279
Source
Eur J Appl Physiol. 2010 Oct 15;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-2010
Author
Marjo Tourula
Takako Fukazawa
Arja Isola
Juhani Hassi
Yutaka Tochihara
Hannu Rintamäki
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health Sciences, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FI-90014, University of Oulu, Finland, marjo.tourula@oulu.fi.
Source
Eur J Appl Physiol. 2010 Oct 15;
Date
Oct-15-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
It is a common practice in Northern countries that children aged about 2 weeks to 2 years take their daytime sleep outdoors in prams in winter. The aim was to evaluate the thermal insulation of clothing of infants sleeping outdoors in winter. Clothing data of infants aged 3.5 months was collected, and sleep duration, skin and microclimate temperatures, humidity inside middle wear, air temperature and velocity of the outdoor environment were recorded during sleep taken outdoors (n = 34) and indoors (n = 33) in families' homes. The insulation of clothing ensembles was measured by using a baby-size thermal manikin, and the values were used for defining clothing insulation of the observed infants. Required clothing insulation for each condition was estimated according to ISO 11079. Clothing insulation did not correlate with ambient air temperature. The observed and required insulation of the study group was equal at about -5°C, but overdressing existed in warmer and deficiency in thermal insulation in colder temperatures (r (s) 0.739, p 
PubMed ID
20949360 View in PubMed
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Health-check questionnaire for subjects exposed to cold.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181521
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2003 Dec;62(4):436-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Juhani Hassi
Veli-Pekka Raatikka
Maire Huurre
Author Affiliation
Centre for Arctic Medicine, Thule Institute, University of Oulu, Finland. juhani.hassi@oulu.fi
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2003 Dec;62(4):436-43
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cold Temperature - adverse effects
Finland
Humans
Mass Screening
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - standards
Occupational Health
Questionnaires
Risk
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk Management - methods
Workplace
Abstract
Human exposure to cold outdoor and indoor temperatures below 10 degrees C may be associated with various cold-related sensations and symptoms. It is not possible to predict a person's survival ability only by assessing thermal environments; but individual screening is always required for good health care practice with regards to treatment and/or prevention.
As part of a development project, a health-check questionnaire was developed for the workers exposed to cold. The completion of the development was carried out in the framework of a Nordic collaboration.
This was three-level medical screening protocol for detecting individual cold-related health ailments. "The health-check questionnaire for subjects exposed to cold" comprises the first step of the screening protocol. The medical screening was harmonized with the assessment practices for cold-related health risks in the workplaces.
A "health-check questionnaire for subjects exposed to cold" was developed as the first step of the three-level medical screening for the detection of cold-related health ailments of individuals. The analogical assessment practices for the cold-related health risks in the workplaces were developed in the same project. They both aim towards the establishment of an ISO standard for working in cold environments.
PubMed ID
14964769 View in PubMed
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23 records – page 1 of 3.