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Abnormal skin in toe webs is a marker for abnormal glucose metabolism. A cross-sectional survey among 1,849 adults in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299221
Source
Sci Rep. 2017 08 22; 7(1):9125
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-22-2017
Author
Suvi-Päivikki Sinikumpu
Juha Auvinen
Jari Jokelainen
Laura Huilaja
Katri Puukka
Aimo Ruokonen
Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
Kaisa Tasanen
Markku Timonen
Author Affiliation
PEDEGO Research Unit, University of Oulu, Department of Dermatology and Medical Research Center Oulu, Oulu University Hospital, P.O. Box 20, Oulu, 90029, Finland. suvi-paivikki.sinikumpu@oulu.fi.
Source
Sci Rep. 2017 08 22; 7(1):9125
Date
08-22-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Biomarkers
Blood glucose
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Glucose - metabolism
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Skin - pathology
Toes
Abstract
Diabetes is undiagnosed disease and easy screening tools for it are warranted. Because foot complications are usual in diabetes, we aimed to test hypothesis that skin abnormalities are found already from patients who are not aware of having diabetes, by studying the possible association between unhealthy toe web skin and abnormal glucose metabolism. 1,849 cases without previously diagnosed diabetes participated to the 46-year follow-up study of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort. A skin investigation was performed for all, and abnormal skin findings in toe web spaces were taken as explanatory variables. Abnormal glucose tolerance was the main outcome and it was tested with an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), glycosylated haemoglobin fraction (HbA1c) Values are numbers (percentages) of sub and fasting blood glucose. The participants who had any abnormal skin findings in toe webs were associated with 2.5-fold (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.3-4.9) and 6-fold (OR 6.2, 1.4-27.6) increased risk of having previously undiagnosed diabetes detected by a 2-hour OGTT and HbA1c, respectively. The predictive power of toe web findings was comparable with FINDRISC score. Abnormal skin findings in the toe webs show increased risk of occult diabetes, and may, thus serve as an additional sign of undiagnosed diabetes.
PubMed ID
28831117 View in PubMed
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Accumulated exposure to unemployment is related to impaired glucose metabolism in middle-aged men: A follow-up of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291192
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2017 Aug; 11(4):365-372
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Nina Rautio
Tuulia Varanka-Ruuska
Eeva Vaaramo
Saranya Palaniswamy
Rozenn Nedelec
Jouko Miettunen
Jaro Karppinen
Juha Auvinen
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
Sylvain Sebert
Leena Ala-Mursula
Author Affiliation
Center for Life Course Health Research, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, 90014 Oulu, Finland; Unit of Primary Health Care, Oulu University Hospital, OYS, P.O. Box 20, 90029 Oulu, Finland. Electronic address: nina.rautio@oulu.fi.
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2017 Aug; 11(4):365-372
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Chi-Square Distribution
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Prediabetic State - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Registries
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time Factors
Unemployment
Abstract
We explored whether registered unemployment is associated with impaired glucose metabolism in general population.
Based on Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 at 46 years, we analyzed the oral glucose tolerance tests of 1970 men and 2544 women in relation to their preceding three-year employment records in three categories of unemployment exposure: no (employed), low (=1-year) and high exposure (>1-year).
Among men, pre-diabetes was found in 19.2% of those with no unemployment, 23.0% with low and 27.0% with high exposure, the corresponding figures for screen-detected type 2 diabetes were 3.8%, 3.8% and 9.2% (p
Notes
CommentIn: Prim Care Diabetes. 2018 Feb;12 (1):92 PMID 28807657
PubMed ID
28456438 View in PubMed
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Accumulation of lifestyle and psychosocial problems and persistence of adverse lifestyle over two-year follow-up among Finnish adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265971
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:542
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Eveliina Heikkala
Jouko Remes
Markus Paananen
Simo Taimela
Juha Auvinen
Jaro Karppinen
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:542
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adolescent Health Services
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life Style
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Obesity
Questionnaires
Smoking
Abstract
Adolescent'psychosocial problems associate with unhealthy behaviors, but data on co-occurring patterns is sparse. We investigated 1) whether adolescents could be categorized into meaningful subgroups with respect to psychosocial and lifestyle factors, 2) whether the prevalence of physical inactivity, overweight and smoking vary within the subgroups and 3) whether these unhealthy behaviors persist in a two-year follow-up.
The study was based on a subgroup of the 1986 Northern Finland Birth Cohort, which consisted of adolescents who replied to a postal questionnaire at 16 years (n?=?6792) and a subgroup of this sample at 18 years (n?=?1552). Latent class analysis (LCA) was performed to establish clusters at 16 years.
Smoking co-existed with emotional and behavioral problems in both genders. Boys with the most inactive lifestyle slept poorly, whereas multiple problems co-occurred among girls. Those with a high body mass index (BMI) separated as groups of their own. Different combinations of adverse lifestyle and emotional and behavioral problems were relatively common in both sexes as only 51% of boys and 67% of girls belonged to the reference cluster with low probability for these findings. Physical inactivity, high BMI and smoking tended to persist over the two-year follow-up.
It seems that lifestyle and psychosocial factors divide adolescents into distinct subgroups in which unhealthy lifestyle patterns remain between the ages of 16 and 18. This may indicate problems in other life areas and expose them to an increased risk of future health problems.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24884444 View in PubMed
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Accumulation of psychosocial and lifestyle factors and risk of low back pain in adolescence: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276396
Source
Eur Spine J. 2016 Feb;25(2):635-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Paula Mikkonen
Eveliina Heikkala
Markus Paananen
Jouko Remes
Simo Taimela
Juha Auvinen
Jaro Karppinen
Source
Eur Spine J. 2016 Feb;25(2):635-42
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cluster analysis
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Internal-External Control
Life Style
Low Back Pain - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Male
Motor Activity
Obesity - complications - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Low back pain (LBP) is common already in adolescence, and many risk indicators including both psychosocial and lifestyle factors have been recognized. Our purpose was to assess whether the co-occurrence of psychosocial (externalizing and internalizing) problems and lifestyle factors (leisure time physical activity, sedentary behaviour, sleep, smoking, and overweight/obesity) associate with LBP at 16 years cross-sectionally or with new LBP at 18-year follow-up.
The study population, drawn from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986, consisted of 1625 participants (712 boys and 913 girls) who completed a questionnaire on potential explanatory factors at 16 years and on LBP at 16 and 18 years. The outcome measure was 'reporting LBP' or 'consultation for LBP' during the past 6 months. Latent Class Analysis (LCA) was utilized to study the co-occurrence of the explanatory factors.
Among both genders, four clusters were found. Externalizing behaviour problems were associated with 'reporting LBP' (RR 1.5, boys 1.4, girls) and 'consultation for LBP' (RR 1.6 for both genders) at baseline among both genders. In addition, the cluster of multiple risk behaviours was associated with both 'reporting LBP' (RR 1.3) and 'consultation for LBP' (RR 2.5) and the obese cluster with 'consultation for LBP' (RR 1.7) among girls. Externalizing behaviour problems at 16 years predicted 'consultation for LBP' at 18 years among girls (RR 3.6).
Our results stress the role of psychosocial factors in reporting and seeking care for adolescent LBP.
PubMed ID
26070550 View in PubMed
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Association between height and osteoarthritis of the knee and hip: The Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292398
Source
Int J Rheum Dis. 2017 Sep; 20(9):1095-1104
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
Maiju Welling
Juha Auvinen
Petri Lehenkari
Minna Männikkö
Jaro Karppinen
Pasi J Eskola
Author Affiliation
Center for Life Course Health Research, Medical Research Center Oulu, Oulu University Hospital and University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Int J Rheum Dis. 2017 Sep; 20(9):1095-1104
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Body Height
Body Weight
Case-Control Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoarthritis, Hip - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Osteoarthritis, Knee - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
To investigate whether height at the age of 31 is associated with the incidence of knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA) in the following 15 years.
Participants in The Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 (NFBC1966) diagnosed with knee or hip OA between the ages of 31 and 46 were used as OA cases. Study subjects without knee and hip OA were used as the controls. Height and weight were measured in a clinical examination at the age of 31 (baseline). Mean heights for the OA cases and the controls were compared by an independent samples t-test. Cox regression analysis was performed to calculate the risk for OA for different height quartiles. The results were adjusted for body mass index/weight, education, smoking and leisure-time physical activity at baseline. Additionally, a Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed.
Men with knee OA were 2.6 cm taller (P
PubMed ID
28296269 View in PubMed
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The Association Between Low Grade Systemic Inflammation and Skin Diseases: A Cross-sectional Survey in the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289454
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2018 Jan 12; 98(1):65-69
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-12-2018
Author
Suvi-Päivikki Sinikumpu
Laura Huilaja
Juha Auvinen
Jari Jokelainen
Katri Puukka
Aimo Ruokonen
Markku Timonen
Kaisa Tasanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, Medical Research Center, PEDEGO Research Group, University of Oulu and Oulu University Hospital, FIN-90029 OYS Oulu, Finland. suvi-paivikki.sinikumpu@oulu.fi.
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2018 Jan 12; 98(1):65-69
Date
Jan-12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Inflammation - blood - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Onychomycosis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Rosacea - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Skin Diseases - epidemiology
Abstract
Low grade inflammation is associated with many noncommunicable diseases. The association between skin diseases in general and systemic inflammation has not previously been studied at the population level. A whole-body investigation on 1,930 adults belonging to Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 was performed and high sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP) level was measured as a marker of low grade inflammation in order to determine the association between low grade inflammation and skin diseases in an unselected adult population. After adjustment for confounding factors the following skin disorders were associated with low grade inflammation in multinomial logistic regression analysis: atopic eczema (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.2-3.9), onychomycosis (OR 2.0, 1.2-3.2) and rosacea (OR 1.7, 1.1-2.5). After additionally adjusting for body mass index and systemic diseases, the risks for atopic eczema (OR 2.4, 1.3-4.6) and onychomycosis (OR 1.9, 1.1-3.1) remained statistically significant. In conclusion, low grade inflammation is present in several skin diseases.
PubMed ID
28902946 View in PubMed
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The Association Between Low Grade Systemic Inflammation and Skin Diseases: A Cross-sectional Survey in the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289612
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2018 Jan 12; 98(1):65-69
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-12-2018
Author
Suvi-Päivikki Sinikumpu
Laura Huilaja
Juha Auvinen
Jari Jokelainen
Katri Puukka
Aimo Ruokonen
Markku Timonen
Kaisa Tasanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, Medical Research Center, PEDEGO Research Group, University of Oulu and Oulu University Hospital, FIN-90029 OYS Oulu, Finland. suvi-paivikki.sinikumpu@oulu.fi.
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2018 Jan 12; 98(1):65-69
Date
Jan-12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Inflammation - blood - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Onychomycosis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Rosacea - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Skin Diseases - epidemiology
Abstract
Low grade inflammation is associated with many noncommunicable diseases. The association between skin diseases in general and systemic inflammation has not previously been studied at the population level. A whole-body investigation on 1,930 adults belonging to Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 was performed and high sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP) level was measured as a marker of low grade inflammation in order to determine the association between low grade inflammation and skin diseases in an unselected adult population. After adjustment for confounding factors the following skin disorders were associated with low grade inflammation in multinomial logistic regression analysis: atopic eczema (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.2-3.9), onychomycosis (OR 2.0, 1.2-3.2) and rosacea (OR 1.7, 1.1-2.5). After additionally adjusting for body mass index and systemic diseases, the risks for atopic eczema (OR 2.4, 1.3-4.6) and onychomycosis (OR 1.9, 1.1-3.1) remained statistically significant. In conclusion, low grade inflammation is present in several skin diseases.
PubMed ID
28902946 View in PubMed
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Associations of fitness and physical activity with orthostatic responses of heart rate and blood pressure at midlife.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300456
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2019 Jun; 29(6):874-885
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2019
Author
Päivi Oksanen
Mikko P Tulppo
Juha Auvinen
Maisa Niemelä
Timo Jämsä
Katri Puukka
Heikki V Huikuri
Raija Korpelainen
Mika Venojärvi
Antti M Kiviniemi
Author Affiliation
Institute of Biomedicine, Sports and Exercise Medicine, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2019 Jun; 29(6):874-885
Date
Jun-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Blood pressure
Cardiorespiratory fitness
Exercise
Exercise Test
Female
Finland
Heart rate
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
Cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and physical activity (PA) are associated with autonomic function, but their associations to orthostatic autonomic responses are unclear in epidemiological setting. We hypothesized that higher CRF and PA would associate with higher immediate vagal responses and lower incidence of adverse findings during orthostatic test. At age of 46, 787 men and 938 women without cardiorespiratory diseases and diabetes underwent an orthostatic test (3-minutes sitting, 3-minutes standing) with recording of RR intervals (RRi) and blood pressure (BP) by finger plethysmography. Acute responses of RRi (30:15 ratio) and BP were calculated. CRF was measured by a submaximal step test and daily amount of moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) for 2 weeks by wrist-worn accelerometer. Lifelong PA was based on questionnaires at ages of 14, 31, and 46. High CRF was significantly associated with higher RRi 30:15 ratio (adjusted standardized ß = 0.17, P 
PubMed ID
30697819 View in PubMed
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Changes in alcohol use in relation to sociodemographic factors in early midlife.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275744
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2016 May;44(3):249-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Daniel Vladimirov
Solja Niemelä
Juha Auvinen
Markku Timonen
Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
Leena Ala-Mursula
Jaana Laitinen
Jouko Miettunen
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2016 May;44(3):249-57
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Educational Status
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Marital Status - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
To describe changes in alcohol use in relation to employment, education and relationship statuses in a general population sample in early midlife using prospective birth cohort data.
In the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 (N=5621) alcohol use was studied in participants at two time points: ages 31 and 46. The total mean consumption was calculated and participants were classified into steady drinkers, increasers and reducers based on the change in consumption between the ages of 31 and 46. Multinomial regression analysis was conducted with changes in employment and relationship statuses.
Daily alcohol consumption rose by 30% for men and 40% for women. Persons who were unemployed, single or had a low level of education consumed most. Of the alcohol users, 70% were classified as steady drinkers, 10% as reducers and 20% as increasers. For men, leaving a relationship (odds ratio, OR 1.5; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.0-2.1) predicted increased alcohol use. The predictors of reducing consumption were entering a relationship for men (OR 1.9; 95% CI: 1.2-2.9) and women (OR 1.9; 95% CI: 1.1-3.1), and leaving a relationship (OR 2.6; 95% CI: 1.6-4.3) for women.
Alcohol consumption among Finns of northern origin does not seem to decline with age. Alcohol usage is fairly stable in the majority of middle-aged people. A substantial proportion of alcohol users engage in either binge or heavy drinking. Gender differences in predictors exist-- changes in relationship status predict a reduction in alcohol usage in women, whereas in men, divorce predicts an increase in usage.
PubMed ID
26685194 View in PubMed
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38 records – page 1 of 4.