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Anemia in Mexican women: a public health problem.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181821
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2003;45 Suppl 4:S499-507
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Teresa Shamah-Levy
Salvador Villalpando
Juan A Rivera
Fabiola Mejía-Rodríguez
Martha Camacho-Cisneros
Eric A Monterrubio
Author Affiliation
Centro de Investigación en Nutrición y Salud, Departamento de Vigilancia de la Nutrición, Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Avenida Universidad 655, colonia Santa María Ahuacatitlán 62508 Cuernavaca, Morelos, México. tshamah@correo.insp.mx
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2003;45 Suppl 4:S499-507
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anemia - epidemiology
Child
Female
Humans
Mexico - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Public Health
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to quantify the prevalence and distribution of anemia among women of childbearing age (12 to 49 years) participating in the 1999 National Nutrition Survey (NNS-1999).
The survey had a probabilistic design and was representative at the national level, of urban and rural areas and four regions: North, South, Center, and Mexico City. Hemoglobin concentration was determined in capillary blood samples using a portable photometer (HemoCue), in 17,194 women, 697 of whom were pregnant.
The overall prevalence of anemia was 27.8% in pregnant women and 20.8% in non-pregnant women. Higher prevalences were observed in rural as compared to urban areas, both in pregnant (28.0% vs 27.7%) and non-pregnant (22.6% vs 20.0%) women, but the differences were not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Women in the South had the greatest prevalence (23.2%), followed by those in the North (20.9%), Center (20.6%), and Mexico City (16.4%). Non-pregnant indigenous women had a prevalence of 24.8%, while in-non-indigenous women the prevalence was 20.4%.
Anemia in women of childbearing age is a growing public health problem that justifies the implementation of interventions for its prevention and control. The English version of this paper is available too at: http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.html.
PubMed ID
14746044 View in PubMed
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Breastfeeding in Mexico was stable, on average, but deteriorated among the poor, whereas complementary feeding improved: results from the 1999 to 2006 National Health and Nutrition Surveys.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115377
Source
J Nutr. 2013 May;143(5):664-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Teresita González de Cossío
Leticia Escobar-Zaragoza
Dinorah González-Castell
Horacio Reyes-Vázquez
Juan A Rivera-Dommarco
Author Affiliation
Research Center on Nutrition and Health, National Institute of Public Health, Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico. tgonzale@insp.mx
Source
J Nutr. 2013 May;143(5):664-71
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Animals
Bottle Feeding - statistics & numerical data - trends
Breast Feeding - statistics & numerical data - trends
Child
Diet
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Formula
Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Mental Recall
Mexico
Milk
Nutrition Surveys
Population Groups
Poverty
Vulnerable Populations
Water
Abstract
We present: 1) indicators of infant and young child feeding practices (IYCFP) and median age of introduction of foods analyzed by geographic and socioeconomic variables for the 2006 national probabilistic Health Nutrition Survey (ENSANUT-2006); and 2) changes in IYCFP indicators between the 1999 national probabilistic Nutrition Survey and ENSANUT-2006, analyzed by the same variables. Participants were women 12-49 y and their
PubMed ID
23514772 View in PubMed
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Conclusions from the Mexican National Nutrition Survey 1999: translating results into nutrition policy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181818
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2003;45 Suppl 4:S565-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Juan A Rivera
Jaime Sepúlveda Amor
Author Affiliation
Centro de Investigación en Nutrición y Salud, Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Avenida Universidad No 655, colonia Santa María Ahuacatitlan, 62508 Cuernavaca Morelos, México. jrivera@insp.mx
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2003;45 Suppl 4:S565-75
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anemia - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Failure to Thrive - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Mexico - epidemiology
Micronutrients - deficiency
Middle Aged
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Prevalence
Abstract
This article presents and overview of the main results and conclusions from the Mexican National Nutrition Survey 1999 (NNS-1999) and the principal nutrition policy implications of the findings.
The NNS-1999 was conducted on a national probabilistic sample of almost 18,000 households, representative of the national, regional, as well as urban and rural levels in Mexico. Subjects included were children
PubMed ID
14746051 View in PubMed
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Energy and nutrient intake among Mexican school-aged children, Mexican National Health and Nutrition Survey 2006.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153406
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2009;51 Suppl 4:S540-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Mario Flores
Nayeli Macías
Marta Rivera
Simón Barquera
Lucía Hernández
Armando García-Guerra
Juan A Rivera
Author Affiliation
Centro de Investigación en Nutrición y Salud, Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Cuernavaca, Morelos, México. mflores@correo.insp.mx
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2009;51 Suppl 4:S540-50
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Eating
Energy intake
Female
Humans
Male
Mexico
Nutrition Surveys
Abstract
To estimate energy, nutrient intake and diet adequacy in school-aged children based on the Mexican National Health and Nutrition Survey 2006 (ENSANUT 2006).
Food intake data from food frequency questionnaires was analyzed for 8 716 children aged 5 to 11 years. Energy and nutrients intake and adequacy were obtained. Comparisons were made at regional, urban/rural areas, socioeconomic status (SES) and nutrition status (body mass index and height/age).
Median energy intake was 1501 kcal/d (percent adequacy: 88.0). Overweight and obesity prevalence was 25.5%. Stunting prevalence was 10%. Children at lowest SES, indigenous and from rural communities showed the highest inadequacies for vitamin A, folate, zinc, and calcium. Overweight children and those highest SES had higher risk of excessive intakes.
Coexistence of over- and undernutrition reflects a polarized model of nutrition transition among Mexican children.
PubMed ID
20464230 View in PubMed
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Energy and nutrient intake in preschool and school age Mexican children: National Nutrition Survey 1999.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181820
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2003;45 Suppl 4:S540-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Simón Barquera
Juan A Rivera
Margarita Safdie
Mario Flores
Ismael Campos-Nonato
Fabricio Campirano
Author Affiliation
Centro de Investigación en Nutrición y Salud, Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Avenida Universidad 655, colonia Santa María Ahuacatitlán, 62508 Cuernavaca, Morelos, México.
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2003;45 Suppl 4:S540-50
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Diet Surveys
Eating
Energy intake
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Mexico
Micronutrients
Nutritional Requirements
Abstract
To estimate energy and nutrient intake and adequacy in preschool and school age Mexican children, using the National Nutrition Survey 1999 (NNS-1999).
Twenty four-h dietary recalls from pre-school (n = 1,309) and school (n = 2,611) children obtained from a representative sub-sample of the NNS-1999 were analyzed. Intakes and adequacies were estimated and compared across four regions, socio-economic strata, and between urban and rural areas, and indigenous vs. non-indigenous children.
Median energy intake in pre-school children was 949 kcal and in school children 1,377 kcal, with adequacies 150% in both age groups. The North and Mexico City regions had the highest fat intake and the lowest fiber intake. Children in the South region, indigenous children, and those in the lowest socio-economic stratum had higher fiber and carbohydrate intakes and the lowest fat intake. These children also showed the highest risks of inadequacies for vitamin A, vitamin C, folate, iron, zinc and calcium.
Mexico is experiencing a nutrition transition with internal inequalities across regions and socio-economic strata. Food policy must account for these differences in order to optimize resources directed at social programs. The English version of this paper is available too at: http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.html.
PubMed ID
14746048 View in PubMed
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Factors associated with overweight and obesity in Mexican school-age children: results from the National Nutrition Survey 1999.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181819
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2003;45 Suppl 4:S551-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Bernardo Hernández
Lucía Cuevas-Nasu
Teresa Shamah-Levy
Eric A Monterrubio
Claudia Ivonne Ramírez-Silva
Raquel García-Feregrino
Juan A Rivera
Jaime Sepúlveda-Amor
Author Affiliation
Centro de Investigación en Salud Poblacional, Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Avenida Universidad 655, colonia Santa María Ahuacatitlán 62508 Cuernavaca, Morelos, México. bhernand@correo.insp.mx
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2003;45 Suppl 4:S551-7
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Mexico - epidemiology
Multivariate Analysis
Nutrition Surveys
Obesity - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Abstract
The objective of the study was to measure the prevalence of overweight and obesity in Mexican school-age children (5-11 years) in the National Nutrition Survey 1999 (NNS-1999).
Overweight and obesity (defined as an excess of adipose tissue in the body) were evaluated through the Body Mass Index (BMI) in 10,901 children, using the standard proposed by the International Obesity Task Force. Sociodemographic variables were obtained using a questionnaire administered to the children's mothers.
The national prevalence of overweight and obesity was reported to be 19.5%. The highest prevalence figures were found in Mexico City (26.6%) and the North region (25.6%). When adjusting by region, rural or urban area, sex, maternal schooling, socioeconomic status, indigenous ethnicity and age, the highest prevalences of overweight and obesity were found among girls. The risks of overweight and obesity were positively associated with maternal schooling, children's age and socioeconomic status.
Overweight and obesity are prevalent health problems in Mexican school-age children, particularly among girls, and positively associated with socioeconomic status, age, and maternal schooling. This is a major public health problem requiring preventive interventions to avoid future health consequences. The English version of this paper is available too at: http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.html.
PubMed ID
14746049 View in PubMed
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Nutritional status of indigenous children younger than five years of age in Mexico: results of a national probabilistic survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181823
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2003;45 Suppl 4:S466-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Juan A Rivera
Eric A Monterrubio
Teresa González-Cossío
Raquel García-Feregrino
Armando García-Guerra
Jaime Sepúlveda-Amor
Author Affiliation
Centro de Investigación en Nutrición y Salud, Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Avenida Universidad No 655, colonia Santa María Ahuacatitlán, 62508 Cuernavaca, Morelos, México. jrivera@insp.mx
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2003;45 Suppl 4:S466-76
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anemia - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Male
Malnutrition - epidemiology
Mexico - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Nutritional Status
Prevalence
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
To compare the prevalence of undernutrition and anemia in indigenous and non-indigenous children 0.05). The prevalence of anemia in indigenous children was one third greater than in non-indigenous children at the national level (p 0.05) in rural areas. These differences were reduced to about half when adjusting for SES but remained significantly higher in indigenous children (p
PubMed ID
14746041 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of anemia in children 1 to 12 years of age. Results from a nationwide probabilistic survey in Mexico.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181822
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2003;45 Suppl 4:S490-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Salvador Villalpando
Teresa Shamah-Levy
Claudia Ivonne Ramírez-Silva
Fabiola Mejía-Rodríguez
Juan A Rivera
Author Affiliation
Centro de Investigación en Nutrición y Salud, Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Cuernavaca, Morelos, México. svillalp@insp.mx
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2003;45 Suppl 4:S490-8
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anemia, Iron-Deficiency - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant
Mexico - epidemiology
Prevalence
Abstract
To describe the epidemiology and analyze factors associated with iron deficiency anemia in a probabilistic sample of the Encuesta Nacional de Nutrición 1999 (ENN-99) [National Nutritional Survey 1999 (NNS-99)].
The sample included 8,111 children aged 1 to 12 years, and was nationally representative by rural and urban strata and by four geographical regions. Capillary hemoglobin was measured using a portable photometer (HemoCue). The analysis of the determining factors of anemia was performed by odds ratios derived from a logistic regression model and multiple regression models.
The prevalence of anemia was 50% in infants
PubMed ID
14746043 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.