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Long-Term Warming in Alaska Enlarges the Diazotrophic Community in Deep Soils.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299083
Source
MBio. 2019 02 26; 10(1):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
02-26-2019
Author
Jiajie Feng
C Ryan Penton
Zhili He
Joy D Van Nostrand
Mengting M Yuan
Liyou Wu
Cong Wang
Yujia Qin
Zhou J Shi
Xue Guo
Edward A G Schuur
Yiqi Luo
Rosvel Bracho
Konstantinos T Konstantinidis
James R Cole
James M Tiedje
Yunfeng Yang
Jizhong Zhou
Author Affiliation
Institute for Environmental Genomics, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, USA.
Source
MBio. 2019 02 26; 10(1):
Date
02-26-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Alaska
Biota
Global warming
Metagenomics
Microarray Analysis
Nitrogen Fixation
Oxidoreductases - genetics
Plant Development
Soil Microbiology
Tundra
Abstract
Tundra ecosystems are typically carbon (C) rich but nitrogen (N) limited. Since biological N2 fixation is the major source of biologically available N, the soil N2-fixing (i.e., diazotrophic) community serves as an essential N supplier to the tundra ecosystem. Recent climate warming has induced deeper permafrost thaw and adversely affected C sequestration, which is modulated by N availability. Therefore, it is crucial to examine the responses of diazotrophic communities to warming across the depths of tundra soils. Herein, we carried out one of the deepest sequencing efforts of nitrogenase gene (nifH) to investigate how 5?years of experimental winter warming affects Alaskan soil diazotrophic community composition and abundance spanning both the organic and mineral layers. Although soil depth had a stronger influence on diazotrophic community composition than warming, warming significantly (P?
PubMed ID
30808694 View in PubMed
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Long-Term Warming in Alaska Enlarges the Diazotrophic Community in Deep Soils.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298392
Source
MBio. 2019 02 26; 10(1):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
02-26-2019
Author
Jiajie Feng
C Ryan Penton
Zhili He
Joy D Van Nostrand
Mengting M Yuan
Liyou Wu
Cong Wang
Yujia Qin
Zhou J Shi
Xue Guo
Edward A G Schuur
Yiqi Luo
Rosvel Bracho
Konstantinos T Konstantinidis
James R Cole
James M Tiedje
Yunfeng Yang
Jizhong Zhou
Author Affiliation
Institute for Environmental Genomics, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, USA.
Source
MBio. 2019 02 26; 10(1):
Date
02-26-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Abstract
Tundra ecosystems are typically carbon (C) rich but nitrogen (N) limited. Since biological N2 fixation is the major source of biologically available N, the soil N2-fixing (i.e., diazotrophic) community serves as an essential N supplier to the tundra ecosystem. Recent climate warming has induced deeper permafrost thaw and adversely affected C sequestration, which is modulated by N availability. Therefore, it is crucial to examine the responses of diazotrophic communities to warming across the depths of tundra soils. Herein, we carried out one of the deepest sequencing efforts of nitrogenase gene (nifH) to investigate how 5?years of experimental winter warming affects Alaskan soil diazotrophic community composition and abundance spanning both the organic and mineral layers. Although soil depth had a stronger influence on diazotrophic community composition than warming, warming significantly (P?
PubMed ID
30808694 View in PubMed
Less detail

Microbial Community and Functional Gene Changes in Arctic Tundra Soils in a Microcosm Warming Experiment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285900
Source
Front Microbiol. 2017;8:1741
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Ziming Yang
Sihang Yang
Joy D Van Nostrand
Jizhong Zhou
Wei Fang
Qi Qi
Yurong Liu
Stan D Wullschleger
Liyuan Liang
David E Graham
Yunfeng Yang
Baohua Gu
Source
Front Microbiol. 2017;8:1741
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Microbial decomposition of soil organic carbon (SOC) in thawing Arctic permafrost is important in determining greenhouse gas feedbacks of tundra ecosystems to climate. However, the changes in microbial community structure during SOC decomposition are poorly known. Here we examine these changes using frozen soils from Barrow, Alaska, USA, in anoxic microcosm incubation at -2 and 8°C for 122 days. The functional gene array GeoChip was used to determine microbial community structure and the functional genes associated with SOC degradation, methanogenesis, and Fe(III) reduction. Results show that soil incubation after 122 days at 8°C significantly decreased functional gene abundance (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
28974946 View in PubMed
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Microbial functional diversity covaries with permafrost thaw-induced environmental heterogeneity in tundra soil.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295327
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2018 01; 24(1):297-307
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
01-2018
Author
Mengting M Yuan
Jin Zhang
Kai Xue
Liyou Wu
Ye Deng
Jie Deng
Lauren Hale
Xishu Zhou
Zhili He
Yunfeng Yang
Joy D Van Nostrand
Edward A G Schuur
Konstantinos T Konstantinidis
Christopher R Penton
James R Cole
James M Tiedje
Yiqi Luo
Jizhong Zhou
Author Affiliation
Institute for Environmental Genomics, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA.
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2018 01; 24(1):297-307
Date
01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Alaska
Carbon - analysis
Climate change
Fungi - metabolism
Permafrost - chemistry - microbiology
Soil Microbiology
Temperature
Tundra
Abstract
Permafrost soil in high latitude tundra is one of the largest terrestrial carbon (C) stocks and is highly sensitive to climate warming. Understanding microbial responses to warming-induced environmental changes is critical to evaluating their influences on soil biogeochemical cycles. In this study, a functional gene array (i.e., geochip 4.2) was used to analyze the functional capacities of soil microbial communities collected from a naturally degrading permafrost region in Central Alaska. Varied thaw history was reported to be the main driver of soil and plant differences across a gradient of minimally, moderately, and extensively thawed sites. Compared with the minimally thawed site, the number of detected functional gene probes across the 15-65 cm depth profile at the moderately and extensively thawed sites decreased by 25% and 5%, while the community functional gene ß-diversity increased by 34% and 45%, respectively, revealing decreased functional gene richness but increased community heterogeneity along the thaw progression. Particularly, the moderately thawed site contained microbial communities with the highest abundances of many genes involved in prokaryotic C degradation, ammonification, and nitrification processes, but lower abundances of fungal C decomposition and anaerobic-related genes. Significant correlations were observed between functional gene abundance and vascular plant primary productivity, suggesting that plant growth and species composition could be co-evolving traits together with microbial community composition. Altogether, this study reveals the complex responses of microbial functional potentials to thaw-related soil and plant changes and provides information on potential microbially mediated biogeochemical cycles in tundra ecosystems.
PubMed ID
28715138 View in PubMed
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