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Constituent year: a new consideration for injury risk in Canadian youth ice hockey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144975
Source
Clin J Sport Med. 2010 Mar;20(2):113-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Nick Wattie
Stephen P Cobley
Alison Macpherson
William J Montelpare
Jim McKenna
Andrew Howard
Joseph Baker
Author Affiliation
Carnegie Faculty of Sport and Education, Leeds Metropolitan University, Leeds, United Kingdom. n.wattie@leedsmet.ac.uk
Source
Clin J Sport Med. 2010 Mar;20(2):113-6
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Canada
Child
Competitive Behavior
Databases, Factual
Hockey - injuries
Humans
Logistic Models
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Abstract
To examine if chronological age within Canadian youth ice hockey's 2-year age bands influences the proportion of injury.
Retrospective secondary data analyses.
Information on 4736 injured youth ice hockey players (10-15 years old) reported by the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting Prevention Program (CHIRPP) and 4959 (12-15 years old) injured players reported by the Hockey Canada Insurance Database (HCID).
Proportions of injuries according to constituent year (first vs second year of participation within 2-year youth ice hockey age bands).
The influence of age band (Atom, 10/11; Peewee, 12/13; Bantam, 14/15) and level of competitive play on constituent year injury proportions were examined.
Injured Atom and Peewee players (CHIRPP) were more likely to be in constituent year 2 (Atom: odds ratio [OR], 1.72; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.46-2.03; Peewee: OR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.10-1.42). Injured players (HCID) at the highest tiers of competitive play were more likely to be in constituent year 2 (eg, Peewee: OR, 2.91; 95% CI, 1.92-4.41; Bantam: 1.89; 95% CI, 1.46-2.46).
Constituent year may be a factor in determining injury risk and may be relevant to those managing the risk of injury for youth ice hockey players.
PubMed ID
20215893 View in PubMed
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Developmental contexts and sporting success: birth date and birthplace effects in national hockey league draftees 2000-2005.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164885
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2007 Aug;41(8):515-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Joseph Baker
A Jane Logan
Author Affiliation
School of Kinesiology and Health Science, York University, Toronto, Canada. bakerj@yorku.ca
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2007 Aug;41(8):515-7
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Canada
Child Development
Competitive Behavior
Female
Hockey - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Professional Competence
Residence Characteristics
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
To examine relative age and birth place effects in hockey players drafted to play in the National Hockey League (NHL) between 2000 and 2005 and determine whether these factors influenced when players were chosen in the draft.
1013 North American draftees were evaluated from the official NHL website, which provided birthplace, date of birth and selection order in the draft. Population size was collected from Canadian and American census information. Athletes were divided into four quartiles on the basis of selection date to define age cohorts in hockey. Data between the Canadian and American players were also compared to see if the optimal city sizes differed between the two nations.
Relative age and birthplace effects were found, although the optimal city size found was dissimilar to that found in previous studies. Further, there were inconsistencies between the Canadian and American data.
Contextual factors such as relative age and size of birthplace have a significant effect on likelihood of being selected in the NHL draft.
Notes
Cites: J Adolesc. 2003 Oct;26(5):577-8812972270
Cites: Sports Med. 1995 Aug;20(2):59-647481282
Cites: J Sports Sci. 2006 Oct;24(10):1065-7317115521
Comment In: Br J Sports Med. 2008 Dec;42(12):948-919096018
PubMed ID
17331975 View in PubMed
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Injuries in Canadian youth ice hockey: the influence of relative age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162702
Source
Pediatrics. 2007 Jul;120(1):142-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
Nick Wattie
Stephen Cobley
Alison Macpherson
Andrew Howard
William J Montelpare
Joseph Baker
Author Affiliation
School of Kinesiology and Health Science, York University, 4700 Keele St, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M3J 1P3.
Source
Pediatrics. 2007 Jul;120(1):142-8
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Hockey - injuries
Humans
Male
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between relative age and injury prevalence in Canadian youth ice hockey.
In study 1, youth ice hockey-related injuries (among children 10-15 years of age) collected by the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program between 1995 and 2002 were analyzed. The relative ages of injured children were compared across different age groups and injury characteristics (mechanism of injury and severity of injury). In study 2, injuries reported in the Hockey Canada Insurance Database were analyzed. The relative ages of injured children at different levels of play (ie, representative versus house league teams) were compared.
In study 1, the majority of injured players were of older relative age. However, relative age was not related to mechanism of injury or severity of injury. In study 2, approximately 40% of injured players at the highest level of play were relatively older, whereas only 20% to 25% of house league injured players were relatively older.
Relatively older children within ice hockey age groups are at increased risk of injury compared with their younger peers. Furthermore, the risk of injury for relatively older players is greater at more competitive levels of play. This study proposes that the relative age advantage associated with selection to Canadian youth ice hockey teams is accompanied by an increased risk of injury.
PubMed ID
17606571 View in PubMed
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Physical activity, age, and arthritis: exploring the relationships of major risk factors on biopsychosocial symptomology and disease status.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103084
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Jul;22(3):314-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Rachael C Stone
Joseph Baker
Author Affiliation
School of Kinesiology and Health Science, York University, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Jul;22(3):314-23
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthritis - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disease Progression
Exercise - physiology - psychology
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Recreation - physiology - psychology
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Sedentary lifestyle
Abstract
The prevalence of arthritis in aging populations continues to rapidly grow. Research has highlighted 2 principal risk factors for progression of arthritis-related biopsychosocial symptoms: age and physical inactivity. This study examined the relationship between and within physical activity and age on biopsychosocial symptoms of arthritis in adults (age = 30 yr). Hierarchical, multiple-regression analyses were conducted on the Canadian Community Health Survey (Cycle 4.2, 2009-2010, N = 19,103). Results revealed that more-active adults had significantly fewer symptoms (physical unstd. B = -.23, p = .001; pyschosocial unstd. B = -.51, p = .001). In addition, as age increased, physical symptoms intensified and psychosocial symptoms tapered (physical unstd. B = .24, p = .001; psychosocial unstd. B = -.45, p = .001). Inactive older adults had the highest level of physical symptoms, while inactive younger adults had the highest level of psychosocial symptoms (p = .001). Findings highlight the need to target physical activity interventions to specific age cohorts and particular biopsychosocial symptomologies.
PubMed ID
23881509 View in PubMed
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Physical activity and health in Canadian asthmatics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166071
Source
J Asthma. 2006 Dec;43(10):795-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Shilpa Dogra
Joseph Baker
Author Affiliation
Lifespan Health and Performance Laboratory, School of Kinesiology and Health Science, York University, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. shilpad@yorku.ca
Source
J Asthma. 2006 Dec;43(10):795-9
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Asthma - complications - physiopathology - psychology
Canada
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Mental health
Motor Activity
Personal Satisfaction
Questionnaires
Self-Assessment
Abstract
Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease affecting approximately 8% of the Canadian population. Being physically active may assist in management of the disease and lead to improvements in overall health. The purpose of this study was to determine whether involvement in physical activity (PA) influenced self-reported measures of health in asthmatics. The sample included 4272 asthmatic men and 6971 asthmatic women who participated in the Canadian Community Health Survey cycle 2.1. The median age for this group fell in the 40-44 age category. PA level was classified into three categories: active, moderately active, or inactive. In order to determine the relationship between PA levels and the five measures of health (self-perceived health, self-perceived mental health, additional chronic conditions, functional limitations, and satisfaction with life in general) Kruskal-Wallis ANOVAs were conducted and pairwise comparisons were used when significant main effects occurred. For all five measures of health, being physically active increased the likelihood of better health, and greater levels of PA were associated with higher values. In summary, PA was consistently associated with better health in Canadians with asthma. Future research is required to confirm a linear dose-response relationship between PA and health in asthmatics.
PubMed ID
17169834 View in PubMed
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Physical activity and successful aging in Canadian older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150901
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2009 Apr;17(2):223-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Joseph Baker
Brad A Meisner
A Jane Logan
Ann-Marie Kungl
Patricia Weir
Author Affiliation
School of Kinesiology and Health Science, York University, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2009 Apr;17(2):223-35
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Canada
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Exercise
Female
Health Behavior
Health promotion
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Social Marketing
Abstract
Rowe and Kahn (1987) proposed that successful aging is the balance of three components: absence of disease and disease-related disability, high functional capacity, and active engagement with life. This study examines the relationship between physical activity involvement and successful aging in Canadian older adults using data from the Canadian Community Health Survey, cycle 2.1 (N = 12,042). Eleven percent of Canadian older adults were aging successfully, 77.6% were moderately successful, and 11.4% were unsuccessful according to Rowe and Kahn's criteria. Results indicate that physically active respondents were more than twice as likely to be rated as aging successfully, even after removing variance associated with demographic covariates. These findings provide valuable information for researchers and practitioners interested in age-specific interventions to improve older individuals' likelihood of aging successfully.
PubMed ID
19451670 View in PubMed
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Psychosocial predictors of physical activity in older aged asthmatics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156923
Source
Age Ageing. 2008 Jul;37(4):449-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Shilpa Dogra
Brad A Meisner
Joseph Baker
Author Affiliation
Lifespan Health and Performance Laboratory, York University, North York, ON, M3 J 1P3, Canada. shilpad@yorku.ca
Source
Age Ageing. 2008 Jul;37(4):449-54
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aging - physiology - psychology
Asthma - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Psychology
Sex Distribution
Abstract
there is little information available on physical activity (PA) patterns and the psychosocial determinants of PA in older adults with asthma.
to quantify the prevalence of PA in older asthmatics and to explore the potential psychosocial determinants of PA in this population.
cross-sectional data available from the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS), cycle 2.1, were used. There was a total of 1,772 older asthmatics in the sample.
there were significant differences in the prevalence of PA between older asthmatic females compared to middle-aged asthmatic females (chi(2) = 23.65, P
PubMed ID
18515293 View in PubMed
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The relationship between age of asthma onset and cardiovascular disease in Canadians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159695
Source
J Asthma. 2007 Dec;44(10):849-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Shilpa Dogra
Chris I Ardern
Joseph Baker
Author Affiliation
Lifespan Health and Performance Laboratory. shilpad@yorku.ca
Source
J Asthma. 2007 Dec;44(10):849-54
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age of Onset
Asthma - complications - epidemiology
Canada
Female
Heart Diseases - complications - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension - complications - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Stroke - complications - epidemiology
Abstract
To quantify the association between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and asthma in Canadian adults and to determine whether age of asthma onset is a moderator of this association.
We used a sample of 74 342 participants with a mean age of 56.4 +/- 12.5 from cycle 1.1 of the Canadian Community Health Survey. Asthma age of onset was categorized into early-onset (0-20 years) and adult-onset (21-54 years). Three major outcomes were used to estimate the relationship between asthma and CVD, namely: high blood pressure, heart disease, and stroke.
Multiple logistic regression models revealed that asthmatics were 43% (OR = 1.43, CI = 1.19-1.72) more likely to have heart disease, and 36% (OR = 1.36, CI = 1.21-1.53) more likely to have high blood pressure than non-asthmatics. There were no consistent results for age of onset with high blood pressure, heart disease, or stroke.
Using a population-based dataset we confirmed that asthmatics are at increased odds of cardiovascular disease compared to non-asthmatics; furthermore, age of asthma onset did not appear to moderate this relationship. Future research should focus on determining whether asthma severity or allergic/non-allergic phenotypes have a differential effect on the asthma-CVD relationship.
PubMed ID
18097862 View in PubMed
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Role of age at asthma diagnosis in the asthma-obesity relationship.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139671
Source
Can Respir J. 2010 Sep-Oct;17(5):e97-101
Publication Type
Article
Author
Shilpa Dogra
Joseph Baker
Chris I Ardern
Author Affiliation
Lifespan Health and Performance Laboratory, York University, Toronto, Ontario. shilpa.dogra@acadiau.ca
Source
Can Respir J. 2010 Sep-Oct;17(5):e97-101
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Asthma - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Exercise
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - etiology
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To determine whether age at asthma diagnosis has an impact on the previously described relationship between asthma and obesity.
Data were provided from Cycle 1.1 (2000/2001) of the Canadian Community Health Survey, a nationally representative health survey that included 6871 participants (2464 males and 4407 females) with asthma. Body mass index was used to categorize participants as normal weight (18.5 kg/m2 to 24.9 kg/m2), overweight (25 kg/m2 to 29.9 kg/m2) or obese (30 kg/m2 or greater). Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to estimate the odds of overweight and obesity by self-reported age at asthma diagnosis, after accounting for current age and other covariables.
In fully adjusted models, males diagnosed with asthma during adolescence (12 to 20 years of age) were at elevated odds of obesity (OR 1.58; 95% CI 1.03 to 2.43) compared with asthmatic patients diagnosed during childhood (0 to 11 years of age). Women diagnosed with asthma in mid life (21 to 44 years of age) and later life (45 to 64 years of age) were 43% (OR 1.43; 95% CI 1.08 to 1.90) and 56% (OR 1.56; 95% CI 1.00 to 2.44) more likely to be obese than those diagnosed in childhood, respectively.
The impact of age at asthma diagnosis on the asthma-obesity relationship differed between males and females. However, the identification of high-risk groups of asthmatic patients may strengthen primary prevention strategies for obesity and related comorbidities at multiple levels of influence.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21038003 View in PubMed
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The role of physical activity and body mass index in the health care use of adults with asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150048
Source
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2009 Jun;102(6):462-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Shilpa Dogra
Joseph Baker
Chris I Ardern
Author Affiliation
Lifespan Health and Performance Laboratory, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. shilpad@yorku.ca
Source
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2009 Jun;102(6):462-8
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asthma - complications - physiopathology - therapy
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Obesity - complications - physiopathology
Overweight - complications - physiopathology
Personal Health Services - utilization
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Abstract
Health care use in patients with asthma is affected by many factors, including sex and ethnicity. The role of physical activity (PA) and body mass index (BMI) (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) in this relationship is unknown.
To determine the role of PA and BMI in the health care use of patients with asthma.
A sample of adults with asthma (n=6,835) and without asthma (n=78,051) from cycle 3.1 of the Canadian Community Health Survey was identified. Health care use was self-reported as overnight hospital stays (yes or no), length of overnight hospital stay ( or =4 nights), and physician consultations ( or =3). Self-reported physical activities were used to derive total energy expenditure and to classify participants as active (>3.0 kcal/kg of body weight per day), moderately active (1.5-3.0 kcal/kg of body weight per day), and inactive (
PubMed ID
19558003 View in PubMed
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13 records – page 1 of 2.