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Joining the dots: The links between education and health and implications for indigenous children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147687
Source
J Paediatr Child Health. 2009 Dec;45(12):692-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Vanessa Johnston
Tess Lea
Jonathan Carapetis
Author Affiliation
Charles Darwin University, Casuarina, Northern Territory, Australia. vanessa.johnston@menzies.edu.au
Source
J Paediatr Child Health. 2009 Dec;45(12):692-7
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Educational Status
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Young Adult
Abstract
This paper provides a general overview of the literature investigating the nexus between education and health; discussing the relationship between these domains at individual, family and community levels. We then briefly examine the programme and research implications of such a framework for interventions aimed at improving education and health, with specific reference to young Indigenous Australians. We find that while education and health are inextricably linked, throughout the life course and at different levels of influence, there is less empirical work exploring this relationship in an Indigenous context. Given the gravity of literacy and numeracy failure rates in school-based education and its potential impact on Indigenous health, we assert an urgent case for rigorous research into interventions that address the barriers to effectiveness in implementing quality educational experiences and opportunities for Indigenous children.
PubMed ID
19863714 View in PubMed
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Rheumatic heart disease in Indigenous children in northern Australia: differences in prevalence and the challenges of screening.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269969
Source
Med J Aust. 2015 Sep 7;203(5):221
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-7-2015
Author
Kathryn V Roberts
Graeme P Maguire
Alex Brown
David N Atkinson
Bo Remenyi
Gavin Wheaton
Marcus Ilton
Jonathan Carapetis
Source
Med J Aust. 2015 Sep 7;203(5):221
Date
Sep-7-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
To compare regional differences in the prevalence of rheumatic heart disease (RHD) detected by echocardiographic screening in high-risk Indigenous Australian children, and to describe the logistical and other practical challenges of RHD screening.
Cross-sectional screening survey performed between September 2008 and November 2010.
Thirty-two remote communities in four regions of northern and central Australia.
3946 Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander children aged 5-15 years.
Portable echocardiography was performed by cardiac sonographers. Echocardiograms were recorded and reported offsite by a pool of cardiologists.
RHD was diagnosed according to 2012 World Heart Federation criteria.
The prevalence of definite RHD differed between regions, from 4.7/1000 in Far North Queensland to 15.0/1000 in the Top End of the Northern Territory. The prevalence of definite RHD was greater in the Top End than in other regions (odds ratio, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.2-4.6, P = 0.01). Fifty-three per cent of detected cases of definite RHD were new cases; the prevalence of new cases of definite RHD was 4.6/1000 for the entire sample and 7.0/1000 in the Top End. Evaluation of socioeconomic data suggests that the Top End group was the most disadvantaged in our study population.
The prevalence of definite RHD in remote Indigenous Australian children is significant, with a substantial level of undetected disease. Important differences were noted between regions, with the Top End having the highest prevalence of definite RHD, perhaps explained by socioeconomic factors. Regional differences must be considered when evaluating the potential benefit of widespread echocardiographic screening in Australia.
PubMed ID
26852054 View in PubMed
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Screening for rheumatic heart disease: current approaches and controversies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118998
Source
Nat Rev Cardiol. 2013 Jan;10(1):49-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Kathryn Roberts
Samantha Colquhoun
Andrew Steer
Bo Reményi
Jonathan Carapetis
Author Affiliation
Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Royal Darwin Hospital Campus, Rocklands Drive, Casuarina, Darwin, NT 0810, Australia.
Source
Nat Rev Cardiol. 2013 Jan;10(1):49-58
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Diagnostic Imaging - methods
Echocardiography, Doppler, Color
Female
Heart Auscultation
Heart Function Tests
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Rheumatic Heart Disease - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Abstract
Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is a leading cause of cardiac disease among children in developing nations, and in indigenous populations of some industrialized countries. In endemic areas, RHD has long been a target of screening programmes that, historically, have relied on cardiac auscultation. The evolution of portable echocardiographic equipment has changed the face of screening for RHD over the past 5 years, with greatly improved sensitivity. However, concerns have been raised about the specificity of echocardiography, and the interpretation of minor abnormalities poses new challenges. The natural history of RHD in children with subclinical abnormalities detected by echocardiographic screening remains unknown, and long-term follow-up studies are needed to evaluate the significance of detecting these changes at an early stage. For a disease to be deemed suitable for screening from a public health perspective, it needs to fulfil a number of criteria. RHD meets some, but not all, of these criteria. If screening programmes are to identify additional cases of RHD, parallel improvements in the systems that deliver secondary prophylaxis are essential.
PubMed ID
23149830 View in PubMed
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