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Aflibercept vs. Ranibizumab: cost-effectiveness of treatment for wet age-related macular degeneration in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279115
Source
Acta Ophthalmol. 2016 Aug;94(5):441-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Hemangi R Panchmatia
Karen M Clements
Erin Hulbert
Marianne Eriksson
Kim Wittrup-Jensen
Jonas Nilsson
Milton C Weinstein
Source
Acta Ophthalmol. 2016 Aug;94(5):441-8
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angiogenesis Inhibitors - administration & dosage - economics
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Health Care Costs
Humans
Intravitreal Injections
Male
Markov Chains
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Ranibizumab - administration & dosage - economics
Receptors, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor - administration & dosage
Recombinant Fusion Proteins - administration & dosage - economics
Sweden
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A - antagonists & inhibitors
Visual Acuity - drug effects
Wet Macular Degeneration - drug therapy - economics
Abstract
Monthly dosing with ranibizumab (RBZ) is needed to achieve maximal visual gains in patients with neovascular ('wet') age-related macular degeneration (wAMD). In Sweden, dosing is performed as needed (RBZ PRN), resulting in suboptimal efficacy. Intravitreal aflibercept (IVT-AFL) every 2 months after three initial monthly doses was clinically equivalent to RBZ monthly dosing (RBZ q4) in wAMD clinical trials. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of IVT-AFL versus RBZ q4 and RBZ PRN in Sweden.
A Markov model compared IVT-AFL to RBZ q4 or RBZ PRN over 2 years. Health states were based on visual acuity in better-seeing eye; a proportion discontinued treatment monthly or upon visual acuity
PubMed ID
27061020 View in PubMed
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Burden of herpes zoster and post-herpetic neuralgia in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269249
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2015;15:215
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Jonas Nilsson
Tobias Cassel
Lars Lindquist
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2015;15:215
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulatory Care - economics
Antiviral agents - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Costs and Cost Analysis
Databases, Factual
Herpes Zoster - drug therapy - economics - epidemiology
Hospitalization - economics
Humans
Immunization Programs - economics
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Middle Aged
Neuralgia, Postherpetic - complications - economics - epidemiology
Sick Leave - economics
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The societal economic burden of herpes zoster in Sweden is not well described today. This study is a top-down analysis of Swedish registers with the objective to describe the burden of herpes zoster and post-herpetic neuralgia in Sweden during 2011.
Data for inpatient care; outpatient primary and specialized cares; the prescriptions of drugs, sick leave and the number or diagnostic tests were collected from Swedish national databases. The incidence of the disease was estimated based on the number of prescriptions of antiviral drugs.
The incidence of herpes zoster was estimated to 315 and 577 cases per 100,000 people for patients at all ages and >?= 50 years, respectively. Almost 30,000 patients at all ages were diagnosed with herpes zoster and the societal cost to treat these patients, including the cost to treat those patients who later developed post-herpetic neuralgia, added up to nearly 227 MSEK (31.6 M€) which corresponds to 7,600 SEK (€870) per patient. The main contributors to the total cost for the treatment of HZ patients were primary care (43 %); sick leave (28 %); hospitalization (10 %) and specialist care (7 %). Medication was a relatively small contributor with 8.5 MSEK (4 %; 1.0 M€) to the overall costs for patients at all ages. The corresponding total cost including only patients 50 years and older was 168 MSEK (19.2 M€) or 8,200 SEK (€939) per patient.
The current study demonstrates that the burden of herpes zoster is significant in Sweden. The society, the health care payers and the patients potentially have a lot to gain by introducing a vaccination program to patients 50 years and older and as a consequence reduce the economic and clinical burden of herpes zoster and post-herpetic neuralgia.
Notes
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Cites: BMC Infect Dis. 2013;13:58624330510
PubMed ID
26002038 View in PubMed
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Cost-effectiveness analysis of dronedarone versus other anti-arrhythmic drugs for the treatment of atrial fibrillation--results for Canada, Italy, Sweden and Switzerland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124732
Source
Eur J Health Econ. 2013 Jun;14(3):481-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Jonas Nilsson
Örjan Åkerborg
Gaëlle Bégo-Le Bagousse
Mårten Rosenquist
Peter Lindgren
Author Affiliation
OptumInsight, Stockholm, Sweden. Jonas.nilsson@optum.com
Source
Eur J Health Econ. 2013 Jun;14(3):481-93
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Amiodarone - analogs & derivatives - economics - therapeutic use
Anti-Arrhythmia Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Atrial Fibrillation - complications - drug therapy
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - economics - etiology
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Europe
Health status
Humans
Models, Economic
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Sex Factors
Survival Analysis
Abstract
The ATHENA clinical trial enrolled 4,628 patients in 37 countries and evaluated the efficacy of dronedarone 400 mg twice daily versus placebo for the prevention of cardiovascular hospitalisation or death from any cause in patients with paroxysmal or persistent atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter. The trial showed a statistically significant 24% reduction in the primary endpoint cardiovascular hospitalisations or all-cause death. In the current paper, parameters that drive the cost-effectiveness of dronedarone on top of standard therapy versus likely comparators, i.e. amiodarone, sotalol and flecainide, were investigated by means of a health economic model based on the ATHENA clinical trial. Dronedarone is cost-effective, and ICERs are low versus amiodarone with €5,340; €4,620; €3,850 and €5,630 per QALY gained for Canada, Italy, Sweden and Switzerland, respectively. The most significant driving factor for the cost-effectiveness of dronedarone is the increased survival rate for patients on dronedarone.
PubMed ID
22552487 View in PubMed
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Cost-effectiveness of dronedarone in atrial fibrillation: results for Canada, Italy, Sweden, and Switzerland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122813
Source
Clin Ther. 2012 Aug;34(8):1788-802
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Örjan Åkerborg
Jonas Nilsson
Stephanie Bascle
Peter Lindgren
Matthew Reynolds
Author Affiliation
OptumInsight, Stockholm, Sweden. orjan.akerborg@optum.com
Source
Clin Ther. 2012 Aug;34(8):1788-802
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Amiodarone - adverse effects - analogs & derivatives - economics - therapeutic use
Anti-Arrhythmia Agents - adverse effects - economics - therapeutic use
Atrial Fibrillation - complications - diagnosis - drug therapy - economics - mortality
Canada
Computer simulation
Cost Savings
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Diagnostic Tests, Routine - economics
Drug Costs
Europe
Female
Hospital Costs
Hospitalization - economics
Humans
Male
Models, Economic
Office Visits - economics
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Stroke - economics - etiology - prevention & control
Survival Analysis
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Dronedarone is a therapy for the treatment of patients with paroxysmal and persistent atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter. According to results in the ATHENA trial, dronedarone on top of standard of care (SOC) decreases the risk of cardiovascular hospitalizations or death by 24% compared with SOC alone.
A patient-level health economic model was developed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of dronedarone on top of SOC versus SOC alone.
The risk of experiencing stroke, congestive heart failure, acute coronary syndromes, treatment discontinuation, and death was modeled by separate health states, whereas adverse events were included as 1-time cost and utility decrements. State transition probabilities were primarily deduced from the patient-level data from ATHENA using survival analysis. Four sets of analyses were performed to reflect costs and treatment effects in Canada, Italy, Sweden, and Switzerland. Cost-effectiveness analysis was also conducted in a newly defined patient population identified by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) to avoid the use of dronedarone in permanent AF patients resembling those in the PALLAS study.
The predicted survival time was, for the Canadian cohort, extended from 10.11 to 10.24 years when dronedarone was added to SOC. Similar results were found for the other countries, resulting in incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) of €5828, €5873, €14,970, and €8554 per QALYs for Canada, Italy, Sweden, and, Switzerland, respectively. These results are all well below current established cost-effectiveness thresholds. In the EMA-restricted population, all patients were predicted to live longer, and the ICER increased but remained within established thresholds, with an average cost per QALY gained of €15,900.
Dronedarone on top of SOC appears to be a cost-effective treatment for atrial fibrillation compared with SOC alone. Despite the differences in the local settings considered, the results were consistent among all the countries included in the study. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00174785.
PubMed ID
22770643 View in PubMed
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Intensive treatment and stem cell transplantation in chronic myelogenous leukemia: long-term follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17040
Source
Acta Haematol. 2005;113(3):155-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Bengt Simonsson
Gunnar Oberg
Mats Bjoreman
Magnus Bjorkholm
Jan Carneskog
Karin Karlsson
Gosta Gahrton
Gunnar Grimfors
Robert Hast
Hans Karle
Olle Linder
Per Ljungman
Johan L Nielsen
Jonas Nilsson
Eva Lofvenberg
Claes Malm
Karin Olsson
Ulla Olsson-Stromberg
Christer Paul
Leif Stenke
Jesper Stentoft
Ingemar Turesson
Ann-Marie Udén
Anders Wahlin
Lars Vilén
Ole Weis-Bjerrum
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine and Hematology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. bengt.simonsson@medsci.uu.se
Source
Acta Haematol. 2005;113(3):155-62
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antineoplastic Agents - administration & dosage
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - administration & dosage
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
Humans
Hydroxyurea - administration & dosage
Interferons - administration & dosage
Leukapheresis
Leukemia, Myeloid, Philadelphia-Positive - mortality - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Multicenter Studies
Survival Analysis
Sweden
Transplantation, Autologous
Transplantation, Homologous
Abstract
In the present study we combined interferon (IFN) and hydroxyurea (HU) treatment, intensive chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (SCT) in newly diagnosed chronic myelogenous leukemia patients aged below 56 years, not eligible for allogeneic SCT. Patients who had an HLA-identical sibling donor and no contraindication went for an allogeneic SCT (related donor, RD). After diagnosis, patients not allotransplanted received HU and IFN to keep WBC and platelet counts low. After 6 months patients with Ph-positive cells still present in the bone marrow received 1-3 courses of intensive chemotherapy. Those who became Ph-negative after IFN + HU or after 1-3 chemotherapy courses underwent autologous SCT. Some patients with poor cytogenetic response were allotransplanted with an unrelated donor (URD). IFN + HU reduced the percentage of Ph-positive metaphases in 56% of patients, and 1 patient became Ph-negative. After one or two intensive cytotherapies 86 and 88% had a Ph reduction, and 34 and 40% became Ph-negative, respectively. In patients receiving a third intensive chemotherapy 92% achieved a Ph reduction and 8% became Ph-negative. The median survival after auto-SCT (n = 46) was 7.5 years. The chance of remaining Ph-negative for up to 10 years after autologous SCT was around 20%. The overall survival for allo-SCT RD (n = 91) and URD (n = 28) was almost the same, i.e. approximately 60% at 10 years. The median survival for all 251 patients registered was 8 years (historical controls 3.5 years). The role of the treatment schedule presented in the imatinib era is discussed.
PubMed ID
15870485 View in PubMed
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Neoadjuvant cisplatin-methotrexate chemotherapy for invasive bladder cancer -- Nordic cystectomy trial 2.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18576
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2002;36(6):419-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Amir Sherif
Erkki Rintala
Oddvar Mestad
Jonas Nilsson
Lars Holmberg
Sten Nilsson
Per-Uno Malmström
Author Affiliation
Department of Urology, Akademiska University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2002;36(6):419-25
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
Bladder Neoplasms - drug therapy - mortality - surgery
Chemotherapy, Adjuvant
Cisplatin - administration & dosage
Cystectomy
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lymphatic Metastasis
Male
Methotrexate - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Metastasis
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Survival Rate
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In the first Nordic cystectomy trial (1986-1989) a chemotherapy combination of cisplatin-doxorubicin and external radiation seemed to improve the long-term survival after cystectomy in patients with stage T3-T4a bladder carcinomas. The aim of this study was to investigate if solely neoadjuvant chemotherapy could influence survival in patients with advanced urothelial bladder cancer undergoing cystectomy. METHODS: The study (1991-1997) recruited 317 patients with T2-T4aNXM0 urothelial bladder tumours. The patients were randomly allocated to three courses of cisplatin-methotrexate or no pretreatment before cystectomy, eight were subsequently excluded due to protocol violation. RESULTS: Chemotherapy according to protocol was administered to 74% (115/155) of the patients in the experimental arm. No chemotherapy related mortality was observed. Of remaining patients in the experimental arm, 14 did not receive any chemotherapy, nine discontinued after one course and 14 after two courses due to side effects. Median follow-up time among censored patients was 5.3 years. Estimated 5-year overall survival was 53% in the experimental arm and 46% in the control arm (n.s. log-rank test). The proportion of patients with pathological stage pT0 was 26.4% in the experimental arm and 11.5% in the control arm (p = 0.001). Risk of locoregional relapse and distant metastases was similar in the study arms. CONCLUSIONS: The chemotherapy regimen was well tolerated. Despite substantial downstaging no statistically significant survival benefit with the neoadjuvant therapy could be seen after 5 years of follow-up.
PubMed ID
12623505 View in PubMed
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Neoadjuvant cisplatinum based combination chemotherapy in patients with invasive bladder cancer: a combined analysis of two Nordic studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17841
Source
Eur Urol. 2004 Mar;45(3):297-303
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Amir Sherif
Lars Holmberg
Erkki Rintala
Oddvar Mestad
Jonas Nilsson
Sten Nilsson
Per-Uno Malmström
Author Affiliation
Department of Urology, Akademiska University Hospital, SE-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden. amir.sherif@swipnet.se
Source
Eur Urol. 2004 Mar;45(3):297-303
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
Bladder Neoplasms - drug therapy - mortality - radiotherapy - surgery
Chemotherapy, Adjuvant
Chi-Square Distribution
Cisplatin - administration & dosage
Cystectomy
Doxorubicin - administration & dosage
Female
Humans
Male
Methotrexate - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Metastasis
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local
Randomized Controlled Trials
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Scandinavia
Survival Analysis
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: A Nordic collaborative group assessed the effectiveness of cisplatinum based combination chemotherapy prior to cystectomy in two consecutive trials. We analyzed overall survival in all patients and in prespecified subgroups defined by preoperative T-stage, gender and age. METHODS: The studies included in 1985-1997 620 patients with clinically T1G3, T2-T4aNXM0 urothelial bladder cancer and WHO performance
PubMed ID
15036674 View in PubMed
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No Evidence for Increased Brain Tumour Incidence in the Swedish National Cancer Register Between Years 1980-2012.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298886
Source
Anticancer Res. 2019 Feb; 39(2):791-796
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2019
Author
Jonas Nilsson
Jacob Järås
Roger Henriksson
Georg Holgersson
Stefan Bergström
Jimmy Estenberg
Torsten Augustsson
Michael Bergqvist
Author Affiliation
Center for Research and Development, Uppsala University/County Council of Gävleborg, Gävle Hospital, Gävle, Sweden.
Source
Anticancer Res. 2019 Feb; 39(2):791-796
Date
Feb-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Brain Neoplasms - epidemiology
Cell Phone
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Glioma - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Meningeal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Meningioma - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The main objective of this study was to evaluate if there was an increased incidence of brain tumours between years 1980-2012, a time period when mobile phone usage has increased substantially.
From the Swedish Cancer Registry, cases of meningiomas, low-grade gliomas (LGG) and high-grade gliomas (HGG) were identified in patients between 1980-2012. Direct age-standardised incidence rates were used to calculate incidence trends over time.
A total of 13,441 cases of meningiomas, 12,259 cases of high-grade gliomas and 4,555 cases of LGG were reported to the register during the study period. The results suggest that there may be a negative development in the trend for LGG of -0,016 cases per 100,000 and year, corresponding to a mean reduction of approximately 1% per year.
The present study was not able to demonstrate an increased incidence of glioma during the past 30 years in Sweden.
PubMed ID
30711958 View in PubMed
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Quality of life in women with breast cancer during the first year after random assignment to adjuvant treatment with marrow-supported high-dose chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, thiotepa, and carboplatin or tailored therapy with Fluorouracil, epirubicin, and cyclophosphamide: Scandinavian Breast Group Study 9401.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18192
Source
J Clin Oncol. 2003 Oct 1;21(19):3659-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-2003
Author
Yvonne Brandberg
Helena Michelson
Bo Nilsson
Christina Bolund
Bjorn Erikstein
Paivi Hietanen
Stein Kaasa
Jonas Nilsson
Tom Wiklund
Nils Wilking
Jonas Bergh
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Karolinska Hospital, S-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Clin Oncol. 2003 Oct 1;21(19):3659-64
Date
Oct-1-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Body Image
Breast Neoplasms - drug therapy - pathology - surgery
Carboplatin - administration & dosage
Chemotherapy, Adjuvant
Cyclophosphamide - administration & dosage
Emotions
Epirubicin - administration & dosage
Female
Fluorouracil - administration & dosage
Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor - administration & dosage
Health status
Humans
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation
Quality of Life
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Thiotepa - administration & dosage
Abstract
PURPOSE: To compare, in high-risk breast cancer patients, the effects on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of two adjuvant treatments. Treatments were compared at eight points during the first year after random assignment to treatment with tailored fluorouracil, epirubicin, and cyclophosphamide (FEC) therapy for nine courses versus induction FEC therapy for three courses followed by high-dose chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, thiotepa, and carboplatin (CTCb) supported by peripheral-blood stem cells. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From March 1994 to March 1998, 525 breast cancer patients (estimated relapse risk > 70% within 5 years with standard therapy) were included in the Scandinavian Breast Group 9401 study. HRQoL evaluation, using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ)-C30 and EORTC Breast Cancer Module-23, included 408 of 446 eligible patients in Finland, Norway, and Sweden. RESULTS: Eighty-four percent to 95% of the patients completed questionnaires at eight points of assessment. Nostatistically significant overall differences were found between the tailored FEC group and the CTCb group for any of the HRQoL variables. Statistically significant differences over time were found for all HRQoL variables. HRQoL in the CTCb group demonstrated a steeper decrease, but a faster recovery than in the tailored FEC group. Emotional functioning improved with increased time from randomization. Higher levels of problems in body image and arm symptoms were reported in the tailored FEC group compared with the CTCb group. Sexual functioning and satisfaction were impaired during the study period. CONCLUSION: Both treatments had a negative influence on HRQoL during the treatment period. Despite the aggressive therapies, the patient's HRQoL returned to levels found at inclusion on most variables.
Notes
Comment In: J Clin Oncol. 2004 May 1;22(9):1765; author reply 1765-615118005
PubMed ID
14512398 View in PubMed
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The role of income in brain tumor patients: a descriptive register-based study : No correlation between patients' income and development of brain cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294666
Source
Med Oncol. 2018 Mar 13; 35(4):52
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-13-2018
Author
Jonas Nilsson
Georg Holgersson
Jacob Järås
Stefan Bergström
Michael Bergqvist
Author Affiliation
Center for Research and Development, Uppsala University/County Council of Gävleborg, Gävle Hospital, 801 87, Gävle, Sweden. Jonas.Nilsson@regiongavleborg.se.
Source
Med Oncol. 2018 Mar 13; 35(4):52
Date
Mar-13-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Brain Neoplasms - economics - epidemiology - pathology
Glioma - economics - epidemiology - pathology
Humans
Incidence
Income - statistics & numerical data
Linear Models
Meningioma - economics - epidemiology
Neoplasm Staging
Registries
Social Class
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Socioeconomic status (SES) and its association with cancer in general have been thoroughly studied in the last decades. Several studies have shown associations between SES and many types of cancer such as lung cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. For gliomas, no clear occupational or exposure risk factors have been identified, although some possible risk factors such as use of cellular telephone are still controversial. The aim in the present study is to analyze whether there is an association between SES and development of brain cancer. Data from 1999 through 2013 were collected from the Swedish Cancer Registry and from the National Statistics of Sweden. Age-standardized incidence rates for people with different income were calculated using linear regression model. A total of 11,892 patients were included, of which 5675 were meningiomas, 1216 low-grade gliomas, and 5001 high-grade gliomas. No clear trend between increasing incidence rates and higher income was seen in neither of the investigated brain tumor histologies. In conclusion, the results should be interpreted with caution, but there does not seem to be a correlation in this material between increased income and development of brain cancer.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29532282 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.