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Adapted Couple Therapy (ACT) for pathological gamblers: a promising avenue.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156657
Source
J Gambl Stud. 2008 Sep;24(3):393-409
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Karine Bertrand
Magali Dufour
John Wright
Benoît Lasnier
Author Affiliation
Département des Sciences de santé Communautaire, Service de Toxicomanie, Université de Sherbrooke, Campus de Longueuil, 1111, rue St-Charles Ouest, Tour Ouest, Bureau 500, Longueuil, QC, Canada J4K 5G4. karine.bertrand@usherbrooke.ca
Source
J Gambl Stud. 2008 Sep;24(3):393-409
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Behavior Therapy - organization & administration
Behavior, Addictive - prevention & control - therapy
Counseling - organization & administration
Couples Therapy - organization & administration
Female
Gambling - psychology
Humans
Male
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Play Therapy - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Quebec
Recurrence - prevention & control
Spouses
Abstract
The study of the effectiveness of treatment for pathological gambling constitutes a field that is still largely unexplored. To date, the models assessed primarily target the individual and include little or no involvement of the family circle. Yet, the deleterious effects of gambling on loved ones and especially spouses are well recognized. Further, the addition of a couple modality to individual treatment has been shown to be effective on many levels in the treatment of substances use disorders. This article therefore proposes a critical review of (1) the literature providing a better understanding of the complex interactions between the couple relationship and pathological gambling, (2) studies on the effects of couple therapies on gamblers and their partners. We then present the therapeutic model developed by our team of clinician-researchers in collaboration with actors from Québec clinical settings: Adapted Couple Therapy (ACT) for pathological gamblers. In the Québec context, this model will serve as a complement to an individual cognitive-behavioral treatment model that has been proven effective and is employed throughout the Canadian province. The assessment of couple therapies could reveal avenues of solutions to better assist pathological gamblers who tend to drop-out of treatment and relapse.
PubMed ID
18560999 View in PubMed
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The clinical representativeness of couple therapy outcome research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161083
Source
Fam Process. 2007 Sep;46(3):301-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
John Wright
Stéphane Sabourin
Josianne Mondor
Pierre McDuff
Salima Mamodhoussen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Montreal, Québec, Canada. john.wright@umontreal.ca
Source
Fam Process. 2007 Sep;46(3):301-16
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bibliometrics
Counseling
Couples Therapy
Humans
Marriage
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Quebec
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The clinical representativeness of outcome studies is defined as the generalizability of recruitment processes, assessment/diagnostic procedures, treatment protocols, and therapeutic results from research settings to naturalistic treatment settings. The main goal of the present study was to examine the clinical representativeness of couple therapy in outcome studies. The data set was formed by 50 published clinical trials, including 34 couple therapy outcome studies for marital distress (CTMD) and 16 couple therapy outcome studies for comorbid relational and mental disorders (CTMD + C). The present findings showed that, overall, the clinical representativeness of couple therapy outcome studies is only fair (i.e., the mean global score is slightly lower than the midpoint of the rating scale used to assess representativeness). CTMD + C studies fared better than CTMD studies on many dimensions of clinical relevance. Studies in which pretherapy training was less intensive (for CTMD studies only), treatment was less structured, and therapists were more experienced showed larger effect sizes than those in which such was not the case.
PubMed ID
17899855 View in PubMed
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[Contextual factors associated with the symptoms of teenagers victims of intrafamilial sexual aggression].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182676
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2003 Nov;27(11):1291-309
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Chantal Thériault
Mireille Cyr
John Wright
Author Affiliation
Département de Psychologie, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Que., H3C 3J7, Montreal, Canada
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2003 Nov;27(11):1291-309
Date
Nov-2003
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Aggression - psychology
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - classification - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Crime Victims - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Family - psychology
Female
Humans
Incest - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Mother-Child Relations
Quebec - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Self Disclosure
Social Support
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Abstract
The aim of the study was to identify the unique contribution of three sets of contextual factors (maternal supports, family problems and characteristics of the sexual aggression) on adolescents' post-disclosure symptoms. All participants were abused by a family member.
A total of 71 adolescents girls were recruited from youth center services across Quebec. Psychological distress was evaluated with "Trauma Symptoms Checklist for Children" (TSC-C; Briere, 1989). Adolescents also completed self-report instruments and semi-structured interviews to evaluate contextual factors.
Regression analyses indicated that general maternal support explain more variance in most of TSC-C symptoms than maternal response to disclosure. Analysis highlight that alcohol problems in family and various characteristics of sexual aggression explain a unique part of variance of several symptoms.
The discussion addresses the need to continue to explore these questions with more specific instruments to evaluate family problems. A large spectrum of symptoms should also be considered.
PubMed ID
14637303 View in PubMed
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[Factors associated with determining child sexual abuse].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147511
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2009 Dec;33(12):888-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Marc Tourigny
Marie Jacob
Isabelle Daigneault
Martine Hébert
John Wright
Author Affiliation
Département de psychoéducation, faculté d'éducation, université de Sherbrooke, J1K 2R1 Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada.
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2009 Dec;33(12):888-96
Date
Dec-2009
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - diagnosis
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Decision Making
Humans
Male
Quebec
Risk factors
PubMed ID
19897245 View in PubMed
Less detail

Intrafamilial sexual abuse: brother-sister incest does not differ from father-daughter and stepfather-stepdaughter incest.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187773
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2002 Sep;26(9):957-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Mireille Cyr
John Wright
Pierre McDuff
Alain Perron
Author Affiliation
Département de Psychologie, Université de Montréal, Succursale Centre-Ville, Qué., Canada.
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2002 Sep;26(9):957-73
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - classification - psychology
Child, Preschool
Fathers
Female
Humans
Incest - psychology
Male
Mothers - psychology
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Siblings
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Three groups of girls who were sexually abused (by either brothers, fathers, or stepfathers) were compared. The purpose was to identify the differing characteristics of the abuse, the family environments, and the psychosocial distress of these children.
Seventy-two girls aged between 5 and 16 were assigned to one of the three groups. Subjects were matched between groups on the basis of their actual age. Children completed measures of traumatic stress; their mothers completed the Child Behavior Checklist-Parent Report Form (CBCL) and other self-report questionnaires on family characteristics. Workers in child protective services completed information regarding the nature and severity of the abuse.
Results suggested few differences in the characteristics of sexual abuse between the three groups. However, penetration was much more frequent in the sibling incest group (70.8%) than in the stepfather incest (27.3%) or father incest (34.8%) groups. Ninety percent of the victims of fathers and brothers manifested clinically-significant distress on at least one measure, whereas 63.6% of stepfather victims did. Compared with father and stepfather perpetrators, brothers were raised in families with more children and more alcohol abuse.
The authors conclude that the characteristics of brother-sister incest and its associated psychosocial distress did not differ from the characteristics of father-daughter incest These findings suggest that theoretical models and clinical practices should be adjusted accordingly and that sibling incest should not necessarily be construed as less severe or harmful than father-daughter incest.
Notes
Comment In: Child Abuse Negl. 2002 Sep;26(9):955-612433138
PubMed ID
12433139 View in PubMed
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Maternal diet, prenatal exposure to dioxin-like compounds and birth outcomes in a European prospective mother-child study (NewGeneris).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266778
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2014 Jun 15;484:121-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-2014
Author
Eleni Papadopoulou
Manolis Kogevinas
Maria Botsivali
Marie Pedersen
Harrie Besselink
Michelle A Mendez
Sarah Fleming
Laura J Hardie
Lisbeth E Knudsen
John Wright
Silvia Agramunt
Jordi Sunyer
Berit Granum
Kristine B Gutzkow
Gunnar Brunborg
Jan Alexander
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Katerina Sarri
Leda Chatzi
Domenico F Merlo
Jos C Kleinjans
Margaretha Haugen
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2014 Jun 15;484:121-8
Date
Jun-15-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dioxins - blood
Environmental Policy
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Gestational Age
Great Britain - epidemiology
Greece - epidemiology
Health Policy
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Mothers
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology
Spain - epidemiology
Abstract
Maternal diet can result in exposure to environmental contaminants including dioxins which may influence foetal growth. We investigated the association between maternal diet and birth outcomes by defining a dioxin-rich diet. We used validated food frequency questionnaires to assess the diet of pregnant women from Greece, Spain, United Kingdom, Denmark and Norway and estimated plasma dioxin-like activity by the Dioxin-Responsive Chemically Activated LUciferase eXpression (DR-CALUX®) bioassay in 604 maternal blood samples collected at delivery. We applied reduced rank regression to identify a dioxin-rich dietary pattern based on dioxin-like activity (DR-CALUX®) levels in maternal plasma, and calculated a dioxin-diet score as an estimate of adherence to this dietary pattern. In the five country population, dioxin-diet score was characterised by high consumption of red and white meat, lean and fatty fish, low-fat dairy and low consumption of salty snacks and high-fat cheese, during pregnancy. The upper tertile of the dioxin-diet score was associated with a change in birth weight of -121g (95% confidence intervals: -232, -10g) compared to the lower tertile after adjustment for confounders. A small non-significant reduction in gestational age was also observed (-1.4days, 95% CI: -3.8, 1.0days). Our results suggest that maternal diet might contribute to the exposure of the foetus to dioxins and dioxin-like compounds and may be related to reduced birth weight. More studies are needed to develop updated dietary guidelines for women of reproductive age, aiming to the reduction of dietary exposure to persistent organic pollutants as dioxins and dioxin-like compounds.
PubMed ID
24691212 View in PubMed
Less detail

Sexual at-risk behaviors of sexually abused adolescent girls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180427
Source
J Child Sex Abus. 2003;12(2):1-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Caroline Cinq-Mars
John Wright
Mireille Cyr
Pierre McDuff
Author Affiliation
Univeristé de Montréal, Centre-ville, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, H3C 3J7.
Source
J Child Sex Abus. 2003;12(2):1-18
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - classification - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Likelihood Functions
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Adolescence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Quebec
Regression Analysis
Risk-Taking
Safe Sex - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The present study investigated sexual at-risk behaviors of sexually abused adolescent girls. Variables of interest were presence of consensual sexual activity, age at first consensual intercourse, number of sexual partners, condom use, and pregnancies. Participants were 125 sexually abused adolescent girls aged 12 to 17 years. Results showed that severity of sexual abuse (e.g., penetration, multiple perpetrators, physical coercion, multiple incidents of abuse) was related to a greater number of sexual at-risk behaviors. For instance, adolescents with a history of sexual abuse involving penetration were 13 times as likely to have been pregnant. Although family characteristics were significantly associated with being sexually active, their effect proved non-significant in the final hierarchical regression. Regression analyses clearly showed that the likelihood of engaging in sexual at-risk behaviors increased as a function of the number of severity factors.
PubMed ID
15105081 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.