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Accomplishment level and satisfaction with social participation of older adults: association with quality of life and best correlates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144806
Source
Qual Life Res. 2010 Jun;19(5):665-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Mélanie Levasseur
Johanne Desrosiers
Gale Whiteneck
Author Affiliation
School of Rehabilitation, Université de Sherbrooke, 3001 12ième avenue Nord, Sherbrooke, QC, J1H 5N4, Canada. Melanie.Levasseur@USherbrooke.ca
Source
Qual Life Res. 2010 Jun;19(5):665-75
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Age Factors
Aged
Aging
Analysis of Variance
Community Networks
Consumer Participation
Consumer Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Mobility Limitation
Motor Activity
Quality of Life - psychology
Quebec
Social Perception
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
This study aimed to (1) explore whether quality of life (QOL) is more associated with satisfaction with social participation (SP) than with level of accomplishment in SP and (2) examine respective correlates of accomplishment level and satisfaction with SP.
A cross-sectional design was used with a convenience sample of 155 older adults (mean age=73.7; 60% women) having various levels of activity limitations. Accomplishment level and satisfaction with SP (dependent variables) were estimated with the social roles items of the assessment of life habits. Potential correlates were human functioning components.
Correlations between QOL and accomplishment level and satisfaction with SP did not differ (P=0.71). However, best correlates of accomplishment level and satisfaction with SP were different. Higher accomplishment level of SP was best explained by younger age, activity level perceived as stable, no recent stressing event, better well-being, higher activity level, and fewer obstacles in "Physical environment and accessibility" (R2=0.79). Greater satisfaction with SP was best explained by activity level perceived as stable, better self-perceived health, better well-being, higher activity level, and more facilitators in "Social support and attitudes" (R2=0.51).
With some exceptions, these best correlates may be positively modified and thus warrant special attention in rehabilitation interventions.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20237957 View in PubMed
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Actual vs best practice for families post-stroke according to three rehabilitation disciplines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161684
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2007 Sep;39(7):513-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Annie Rochette
Nicol Korner-Bitensky
Johanne Desrosiers
Author Affiliation
School of Rehabilitation, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Quebec, Canada. annie.rochette@umontreal.ca
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2007 Sep;39(7):513-9
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Community Health Services
Cost of Illness
Cross-Sectional Studies
Family - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational therapy
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Physical Therapy Modalities
Questionnaires
Speech Therapy
Spouses - psychology
Stroke - psychology - rehabilitation
Abstract
To investigate occupational therapists', physiotherapists' and speech language pathologists' family-related rehabilitation practice post-stroke and its association with clinician and environmental variables.
A Canadian cross-sectional telephone survey was conducted on 1755 clinicians. Three case studies describing typical patients after stroke receiving acute care, in-patient rehabilitation, or community rehabilitation, and including specific descriptors regarding family stress and concern, were used to elicit information on patient management.
One-third of the sample identified a family-related problem and offered a related intervention, but only 12/1755 clinicians indicated that they would typically use a standardized assessment of family functioning. Working in the community out-patient setting was associated (OR 9.16), whereas working in a rehabilitation in-patient setting was negatively associated (OR 0.58) with being a problem identifier, the reference group being acute care. Being a PT (OR 0.53) or an SLP (OR 0.49) vs an OT was negatively associated with being a problem identifier, whereas being older (OR 1.02 ) or working in Ontario (OR 1.58) was associated with being a problem identifier. To work in a community out-patient setting (OR 2.43), being older clinicians (OR 1.02) or not perceiving their work environment being supportive of an on-going professional learning (OR 1.72) was associated with being an intervention user,whereas being a PT (OR 0.50) was negatively associated with being a user.
For these 3 disciplines, the prevalence of a family-related focus is low post-stroke. Given the increasing evidence regarding the effectiveness of family-related interventions on stroke outcomes, it is imperative that best practice is implemented.
PubMed ID
17724549 View in PubMed
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An exploratory study of individual and environmental correlates of fear of falling among community-dwelling seniors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149853
Source
J Aging Health. 2009 Sep;21(6):881-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Johanne Filiatrault
Johanne Desrosiers
Lise Trottier
Author Affiliation
School of Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succursale Centre-ville, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3C 3J7. johanne.filiatrault@umontreal.ca
Source
J Aging Health. 2009 Sep;21(6):881-94
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Accidental Falls
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Environment
Fear
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Health Services Accessibility
Health Surveys
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Rural Population
Sex Factors
Social Support
Urban Population
Abstract
Objectives. The objective of this study was to identify individual and environmental correlates of fear of falling among community-dwelling seniors. Method. The study sample involved 288 community-dwelling adults aged 65 years or older going through the normal aging process. Fear of falling and a series of individual and environmental characteristics were measured with a questionnaire during home interviews. Results. Multivariate logistic regression procedures showed that the strongest correlates of fear of falling are gender, support from a spouse or partner, and residential area. Being a female as well as living in a smaller city or rural area were shown to be risk factors for fear of falling, whereas the availability of support from a spouse or partner was a protective factor. Discussion. Findings from this study suggest that researchers should adopt an ecological perspective to understanding the phenomenon of fear of falling among seniors and collect data on a broader range of individual and environmental factors.
PubMed ID
19581425 View in PubMed
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Applicability of a toolkit for geriatric rehabilitation outcomes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164623
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2007 Jan 30;29(2):97-109
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-30-2007
Author
Claudine Auger
Louise Demers
Johanne Desrosiers
Francine Giroux
Bernadette Ska
Christina Wolfson
Author Affiliation
Research Centre, Montréal Geriatric University Institute, Canada. claudine.auger@umontreal.ca
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2007 Jan 30;29(2):97-109
Date
Jan-30-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Caregivers
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Health status
Humans
Leisure Activities
Male
Mental Status Schedule
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Patient satisfaction
Quebec
Questionnaires
Recovery of Function
Rehabilitation - organization & administration
Social Support
Abstract
To field test the applicability of a multidimensional toolkit for geriatric rehabilitation outcomes which includes nine standardized tools. Applicability is defined as context- and population-specific pragmatic qualities of an assessment tool such as respondent and examiner burden, score distribution and format compatibility.
A sample of 48 older adults representing four diagnostic groups, as well as 26 caregivers, were assessed at home in the first month after discharge from intensive rehabilitation (T1) and 2 months later (T2). Pre-determined qualitative and quantitative applicability criteria were coded and compared at T1 and T2, as well as responsiveness.
A higher respondent burden was found for three self-report tools, as well as a ceiling effect on social functioning tools. Respondent burden, examiner burden and score distribution remained stable or diminished at T2. Format compatibility deteriorated only for the mobility test due to a higher proportion of non ambulatory participants (17%). Low to moderate associations between the tools corroborated that they were not redundant (rPearson
PubMed ID
17364761 View in PubMed
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Assembling a toolkit to measure geriatric rehabilitation outcomes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174726
Source
Am J Phys Med Rehabil. 2005 Jun;84(6):460-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Louise Demers
Johanne Desrosiers
Bernadette Ska
Christina Wolfson
Rossitza Nikolova
Isabelle Pervieux
Claudine Auger
Author Affiliation
Research Centre, Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Am J Phys Med Rehabil. 2005 Jun;84(6):460-72
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Health status
Humans
Leisure Activities
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Pain Measurement
Patient satisfaction
Pilot Projects
Quebec
Recovery of Function
Rehabilitation - organization & administration
Abstract
To gather and assemble relevant patient-based outcome measures with emphasis placed on the older adults' level of functioning and activity performance.
The study was conducted in two phases. First, a set of relevant measurement instruments was identified, and their was value analyzed according to general characteristics and metrologic criteria. Second, this "toolkit" was pretested on 22 older adults with respect to the burden of assessment and the quality of the data.
The toolkit includes eight measurement instruments related to mobility, basic activities of daily living, independent living, leisure, physical functioning, psychologic functioning, social functioning, and caregiver status. Participants' acceptance of the toolkit was high, with all subjects completing the toolkit in two sessions (30-90 mins each). The leisure participation and satisfaction measure was the most difficult to complete. Distributional properties were adequate to ascertain variability between subjects, except for a ceiling effect found for the social functioning measure.
Measurement tools that are used in combination are needed to optimize the applicability and utility of outcome results. The toolkit has the potential to become a valuable method for researchers and clinicians reporting geriatric rehabilitation outcomes.
PubMed ID
15905661 View in PubMed
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Can home health aids using the clinical algorithm Algo choose the right bath seat for clients having a straightforward problem?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256998
Source
Clin Rehabil. 2014 Feb;28(2):172-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Manon Guay
Marie-France Dubois
Johanne Desrosiers
Author Affiliation
1School of Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC, Canada.
Source
Clin Rehabil. 2014 Feb;28(2):172-82
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Aged
Algorithms
Baths - instrumentation
Decision Trees
Disabled Persons
Equipment Design
Female
Home Care Services - manpower - standards
Home Health Aides
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Therapy - manpower - methods
Quebec
Self-Help Devices - standards
Abstract
To determine if Algo, a clinical algorithm to select bathing equipment for 'straightforward' cases, guides home health aides in selecting the appropriate bath seat.
Criterion validity study.
Community home care.
Eight home health aides used Algo with community-dwelling older adults having a straightforward problem.
Their bath-seat recommendations were compared with those proposed by an occupational therapist (OT), which were considered as the gold standard. In order to determine a clinically acceptable threshold of agreement between the recommendations, a subgroup of community-dwelling elderly people was assessed a third time by another OT.
Half of the clients (74/143) for whom bathroom assessments were requested qualified as potentially straightforward cases after triage and were visited at home by a home health aide using Algo. In 84% of cases (95% confidence interval (CI) = [75, 93]), the non-OTs using Algo identified a seat that would enable these older adults to bathe according to their preferences, abilities and environment, as confirmed by the gold standard OT. Moreover, this appropriateness rate did not statistically differ from that obtained when comparing another OT to the gold standard.
Algo guides non-OTs toward a bath seat that meets the needs of community-dwelling older adults in the majority of cases.
PubMed ID
23897948 View in PubMed
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Clinical reasoning process underlying choice of teaching strategies: a framework to improve occupational therapists' transfer skill interventions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120473
Source
Aust Occup Ther J. 2012 Oct;59(5):355-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Annie Carrier
Mélanie Levasseur
Denis Bédard
Johanne Desrosiers
Author Affiliation
School of Rehabilitation, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada. annie.carrier@usherbrooke.ca
Source
Aust Occup Ther J. 2012 Oct;59(5):355-66
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Clinical Competence - standards
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Motor Skills
Occupational Therapy - methods - standards
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Professional-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Self Care - methods
Teaching - methods
Abstract
Clinical reasoning, a critical skill influenced by education and practice context, determines how occupational therapists teach transfer skills. Teaching strategies affect intervention efficacy. Although knowledge about the way teaching strategies are chosen could help improve interventions, few studies have considered this aspect. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore the clinical reasoning process of occupational therapists underlying the choice of strategies to teach older adults transfer skills.
A grounded theory study was carried out with eleven community occupational therapists recruited in six Health and Social Services Centres in Québec, Canada. Data were collected through observations of teaching situations (n = 31), in-depth semi-structured interviews (n = 12) and memos, and were analysed using constant comparative methods. Memos were also used to raise codes to conceptual categories, leading to an integrative framework. Rigour was assured by following scientific criteria for qualitative studies.
The integrative framework includes the clinical reasoning process, consisting of eight stages, and its factors of influence. These factors are internal (experiences and elements of personal context) and external (type of transfer, clients' and their environment's characteristics and practice context).
The clinical reasoning process underlying the choice of strategies to teach transfer skills was conceptualised into an integrative framework. Such a framework supports clinicians' reflective practice, highlights the importance of theory and practice of pedagogy in occupational therapists' education, and encourages consideration and better documentation of the possible influence of practice context on teaching interventions. As such, this integrative framework could improve occupational therapists' transfer skill interventions with older adults.
PubMed ID
22998513 View in PubMed
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Comparison and correlates of participation in older adults without disabilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153233
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2009 Nov-Dec;49(3):397-403
Publication Type
Article
Author
Johanne Desrosiers
Line Robichaud
Louise Demers
Isabelle Gélinas
Luc Noreau
Diane Durand
Author Affiliation
Department of Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Université de Sherbrooke 3001, 12e Avenue Nord, Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada J1H 5N4. johanne.desrosiers@USherbrooke.ca
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2009 Nov-Dec;49(3):397-403
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disabled Persons - psychology
Female
Health status
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Life Style
Male
Quebec - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Sex Factors
Social Behavior
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
This study was conducted to compare, by age group and gender, the level of participation of older adults who had no disabilities, and to determine which characteristics are most associated with participation. This study involved 350 randomly recruited community-dwelling older adults. Participation in daily activities and social roles were measured with the Assessment of Life Habits (LIFE-H). Demographic, health-related and environmental data were also collected. A decline with age was observed in four of the six daily activities domains and two of the four social roles domains of participation. However, these lower scores are mainly explained by the 85+ group, which consistently scored lower than the 65-69-year-old group. No differences were found between the 65-69, 70-74 and 75-79 years old groups. Some participation domains differed according to gender. Satisfaction with participation was high and did not differ between age groups. Characteristics most associated with participation vary according to the domains; generally, age and marital status are the best determinants of participation. This study found that most of older adults have an unrestricted level of participation which decreases only late in the aging process. This reduction in participation in very old adults was not accompanied by a decrease in satisfaction, supporting the hypothesis that they can participate satisfactorily in valued activities.
PubMed ID
19136161 View in PubMed
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Comparison of two functional independence scales with a participation measure in post-stroke rehabilitation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184260
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2003 Sep-Oct;37(2):157-72
Publication Type
Article
Author
Johanne Desrosiers
Annie Rochette
Luc Noreau
Gina Bravo
Réjean Hébert
Catherine Boutin
Author Affiliation
Sherbrooke Geriatric University Institute, Sherbrooke, Québec J1H 4C4, Canada. johanne.desrosiers@usherbrooke.ca
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2003 Sep-Oct;37(2):157-72
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Canada
Disability Evaluation
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Stroke - physiopathology - rehabilitation
Abstract
The objectives of the study were to compare the association and responsiveness of the functional autonomy measurement system (SMAF) and functional independence measure (FIM) as outcome measures addressing functional independence in stroke patients involved in an intensive rehabilitation program and to compare their relationships with a social participation measure after rehabilitation period. One hundred and thirty-two people who had a stroke were evaluated with the SMAF and FIM during the rehabilitation period (T1: admission; T2: discharge; n=132) and twice after discharge (T3=2 weeks; n=118; T4=6 months later; n=102). At T3 and T4, a participation measure, the assessment of life habits (LIFE-H), was added. The main findings are: (1) the total scores on the SMAF and FIM are strongly correlated together (r=0.93 to 0.95; p
PubMed ID
12888229 View in PubMed
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Coping strategies used by seniors going through the normal aging process: does fear of falling matter?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143699
Source
Gerontology. 2011;57(3):228-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Johanne Filiatrault
Johanne Desrosiers
Author Affiliation
School of Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Que., Canada. johanne.filiatrault @ umontreal.ca
Source
Gerontology. 2011;57(3):228-36
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Cognition
Fear - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Quebec
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Abstract
Recent studies show that fear of falling, a frequent fear of community-dwelling seniors, can have a negative impact on their health and quality of life. When fear of falling is intense, it can prompt individuals to limit or avoid certain activities. This activity restriction can lead to premature physical and functional decline and, ultimately, increase the risk for falls. Although activity avoidance/restriction is a common strategy used by seniors to cope with fear of falling, they may use other strategies as well to cope with this fear. However, these other strategies have received little attention to date.
This study aimed at examining and comparing coping strategies used by seniors with and without fear of falling. It also examined if fear of falling is an independent correlate of the use of coping strategies among seniors.
288 seniors aged 65 years or over and going through the normal aging process were assessed during structured home interviews. Fear of falling was assessed through a single question (Are you afraid of falling?) and a 4-category response scale (never, occasionally, often, very often). Coping strategies used by participants were assessed with the Inventory of Coping Strategies Used by the Elderly.
Findings show that seniors with fear of falling use several coping strategies other than activity avoidance/restriction in their daily functioning. Compared with nonfearful seniors, they tend to use a wider range of coping strategies and use them more frequently. Results also indicate that fear of falling is an independent correlate of diversity and frequency of use of behavioral coping strategies.
This study suggests that fall prevention practitioners and researchers should document the range and frequency of use of strategies that seniors may employ to cope with fear of falling. These data could help improve interventions and evaluative research in the domain of fall prevention.
PubMed ID
20453483 View in PubMed
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30 records – page 1 of 3.