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Advanced pubertal growth spurt in subjects born preterm: the Helsinki study of very low birth weight adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138699
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2011 Feb;96(2):525-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Karoliina Wehkalampi
Petteri Hovi
Leo Dunkel
Sonja Strang-Karlsson
Anna-Liisa Järvenpää
Johan G Eriksson
Sture Andersson
Eero Kajantie
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, P.O. Box 30, Mannerheimintie 164, 00271 Helsinki, Finland. karoliina.wehkalampi@helsinki.fi
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2011 Feb;96(2):525-33
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body Height - physiology
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Growth - physiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - physiology
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight - physiology
Male
Menarche - physiology
Parents
Pregnancy
Puberty - physiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Characteristics
Voice - physiology
Abstract
Among people born at term, low birth weight is associated with early puberty. Early maturation may be on the pathway linking low birth weight with cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Subjects born preterm with very low birth weight (VLBW;
PubMed ID
21147886 View in PubMed
Less detail

All-cause and disease-specific mortality among male, former elite athletes: an average 50-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271045
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2015 Jul;49(13):893-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Jyrki A Kettunen
Urho M Kujala
Jaakko Kaprio
Heli Bäckmand
Markku Peltonen
Johan G Eriksson
Seppo Sarna
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2015 Jul;49(13):893-7
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Cause of Death
Dementia - mortality
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life expectancy
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality
Neoplasms - mortality
Sports - statistics & numerical data
Stroke - mortality
Survival Analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate life expectancy and mortality among former elite athletes and controls.
HR analysis of cause-specific deaths sourced from the national death registry for former Finnish male endurance, team and power sports athletes (N=2363) and controls (N=1657). The median follow-up time was 50 years.
Median life expectancy was higher in the endurance (79.1 years, 95% CI 76.6 to 80.6) and team (78.8, 78.1 to 79.8) sports athletes than in controls (72.9, 71.8 to 74.3). Compared to controls, risk for total mortality adjusted for socioeconomic status and birth cohort was lower in the endurance ((HR 0.70, 95% CI 0.61 to 0.79)) and team (0.80, 0.72 to 0.89) sports athletes, and slightly lower in the power sports athletes (0.93, 0.85 to 1.03). HR for ischaemic heart disease mortality was lower in the endurance (0.68, 0.54 to 0.86) and team sports (0.73, 0.60 to 0.89) athletes. HR for stroke mortality was 0.52 (0.33 to 0.83) in the endurance and 0.59 (0.40 to 0.88) in the team sports athletes. Compared to controls, the risk for smoking-related cancer mortality was lower in the endurance (HR 0.20, 0.08 to 0.47) and power sports (0.40, 0.25 to 0.66) athletes. For dementia mortality, the power sports athletes, particularly boxers, had increased risk (HR 4.20, 2.30 to 7.81).
Elite athletes have 5-6 years additional life expectancy when compared to men who were healthy as young adults. Lower mortality for cardiovascular disease was in part due to lower rates of smoking, as tobacco-related cancer mortality was especially low.
PubMed ID
25183628 View in PubMed
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Ambulatory blood pressure in young adults with very low birth weight.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148247
Source
J Pediatr. 2010 Jan;156(1):54-59.e1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Petteri Hovi
Sture Andersson
Katri Räikkönen
Sonja Strang-Karlsson
Anna-Liisa Järvenpää
Johan G Eriksson
Anu-Katriina Pesonen
Kati Heinonen
Riikka Pyhälä
Eero Kajantie
Author Affiliation
Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. petteri.hovi@helsinki.fi
Source
J Pediatr. 2010 Jan;156(1):54-59.e1
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Blood pressure
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Male
Odds Ratio
Social Class
Young Adult
Abstract
We hypothesized that, as compared with a matched control group born at term, young adults with very low birth weight (VLBW
PubMed ID
19796771 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antimicrobial drug use in the first decade of life influences saliva microbiota diversity and composition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311272
Source
Microbiome. 2020 08 21; 8(1):121
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Video-Audio Media
Date
08-21-2020
Author
Sajan C Raju
Heli Viljakainen
Rejane A O Figueiredo
Pertti J Neuvonen
Johan G Eriksson
Elisabete Weiderpass
Trine B Rounge
Author Affiliation
Folkhälsan Research Center, Topeliuksenkatu 20, 00250, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Microbiome. 2020 08 21; 8(1):121
Date
08-21-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Video-Audio Media
Keywords
Adolescent
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Child
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Microbiota - drug effects - genetics
Prospective Studies
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Saliva - drug effects - microbiology
Time Factors
Abstract
The human microbiota contributes to health and well-being. Antimicrobials (AM) have an immediate effect on microbial diversity and composition in the gut, but next to nothing is known about their long-term contribution to saliva microbiota. Our objectives were to investigate the long-term impact of AM use on saliva microbiota diversity and composition in preadolescents. We compared the lifetime effects by gender and AMs. We used data from 808 randomly selected children in the Finnish Health In Teens (Fin-HIT) cohort with register-based data on AM purchases from the Social Insurance Institution of Finland. Saliva microbiota was assessed with 16S rRNA (V3-V4) sequencing. The sequences were aligned to the SILVA ribosomal RNA database and classified and counted using the mothur pipeline. Associations between AM use and alpha-diversity (Shannon index) were identified with linear regression, while associations between beta-diversity (Bray-Curtis dissimilarity) and low, medium or high AM use were identified with PERMANOVA.
Of the children, 53.6% were girls and their mean age was 11.7 (0.4) years. On average, the children had 7.4 (ranging from 0 to 41) AM prescriptions during their lifespan. The four most commonly used AMs were amoxicillin (n = 2622, 43.7%), azithromycin (n = 1495, 24.9%), amoxicillin-clavulanate (n = 1123, 18.7%) and phenoxymethylpenicillin (n = 408, 6.8%). A linear inverse association was observed between the use of azithromycin and Shannon index (b -?0.015, p value = 0.002) in all children, the effect was driven by girls (b -?0.032, p value = 0.001), while not present in boys. Dissimilarities were marked between high, medium and low users of all AMs combined, in azithromycin users specifically, and in boys with amoxicillin use. Amoxicillin and amoxicillin-clavulanate use was associated with the largest decrease in abundance of Rikenellaceae. AM use in general and phenoxymethylpenicillin specifically were associated with a decrease of Paludibacter and pathways related to amino acid degradations differed in proportion between high and low AM users.
A systematic approach utilising reliable registry data on lifetime use of AMs demonstrated long-term effects on saliva microbiota diversity and composition. These effects are gender- and AM-dependent. We found that frequent lifelong use of AMs shifts bacterial profiles years later, which might have unforeseen health impacts in the future. Our findings emphasise a concern for high azithromycin use, which substantially decreases bacterial diversity and affects composition as well. Further studies are needed to determine the clinical implications of our findings. Video Abstract.
PubMed ID
32825849 View in PubMed
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Association between ghrelin gene variations and blood pressure in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167684
Source
Am J Hypertens. 2006 Sep;19(9):920-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Ursula Mager
Marjukka Kolehmainen
Jaana Lindström
Johan G Eriksson
Timo T Valle
Helena Hämäläinen
Pirjo Ilanne-Parikka
Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
Jaakko O Tuomilehto
Leena Pulkkinen
Matti I Uusitupa
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition and Food and Health Research Centre, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland. ursula.mager@uku.fi
Source
Am J Hypertens. 2006 Sep;19(9):920-6
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Blood Pressure - genetics
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Ghrelin
Glucose Intolerance - genetics - physiopathology
Humans
Hypertension - genetics - physiopathology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Peptide Hormones - genetics
Phenotype
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Promoter Regions, Genetic - genetics
Abstract
Ghrelin is a gut-brain hormone, which stimulates food intake and controls energy balance. Recently, it has been shown that ghrelin may also play a role in the regulation of blood pressure (BP) by acting at the sympathetic nervous system. In the present study we genotyped six variants of the ghrelin gene and its promoter, and tested whether these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were associated with BP levels in participants of the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study.
The Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study was a longitudinal study where 522 subjects with impaired glucose tolerance were randomized into either an intervention or control group. DNA was available from 507 subjects (mean body mass index [BMI] 31.2+/-4.5 kg/m2, age 55+/-7 years). All six SNPs were screened by the restriction fragment length polymorphism method.
Subjects with the most common genotype combination of the following four SNPs, -604G/A, -501A/C, Leu72Met, and Gln90Leu, had the lowest systolic (131+/-11 v 137+/-13 mm Hg, P=.003) and diastolic BP levels (79+/-7 v 83+/-7 mm Hg, P=.004) at the baseline of the study and during 3 years of follow-up compared to all other genotypes. Adjustments for age, gender, antihypertensive medication, BMI, waist circumference, and alcohol intake did not change this association.
Several ghrelin gene variations were associated with BP levels in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance.
PubMed ID
16942934 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between vitamin b12 levels and melancholic depressive symptoms: a Finnish population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259549
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2013;13:145
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Jussi Seppälä
Hannu Koponen
Hannu Kautiainen
Johan G Eriksson
Olli Kampman
Jaana Leiviskä
Satu Männistö
Pekka Mäntyselkä
Heikki Oksa
Yrjö Ovaskainen
Merja Viikki
Mauno Vanhala
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2013;13:145
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Depression - blood
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Vitamin B 12 - blood
Abstract
An association between vitamin B12 levels and depressive symptoms (DS) has been reported in several epidemiological studies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate vitamin B12 levels in population-based samples with melancholic or non-melancholic DS as the relationship between vitamin B12 levels and different subtypes of DS has not been evaluated in previous studies.
Subjects without previously known type 2 diabetes, aged 45-74 years were randomly selected from the National Population Register as a part of the Finnish diabetes prevention programme (FIN-D2D). The study population (N?=?2806, participation rate 62%) consisted of 1328 men and 1478 women. The health examinations were carried out between October and December 2007 according to the WHO MONICA protocol. The assessment of DS was based on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, cut-off =10 points). A DSM-IV- criteria based summary score of melancholic items in the BDI was used in dividing the participants with DS (N?=?429) into melancholic (N?=?138) and non-melancholic DS (N?=?291) subgroups. In the statistical analysis we used chi-squared test, t-test, permutation test, analysis of covariance, multivariate logistic regression analysis and multinomial regression model.
The mean vitamin B12 level was 331±176 pmol/L in those without DS while the subjects with non-melancholic DS had a mean vitamin B12 level of 324 ± 135 pmol/L, and those with melancholic DS had the lowest mean vitamin B12 level of 292±112 pmol/L (p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
23705786 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of ADIPOQ gene variants with body weight, type 2 diabetes and serum adiponectin concentrations: the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138003
Source
BMC Med Genet. 2011;12:5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Niina Siitonen
Leena Pulkkinen
Jaana Lindström
Marjukka Kolehmainen
Johan G Eriksson
Mika Venojärvi
Pirjo Ilanne-Parikka
Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Matti Uusitupa
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Nutrition and Food and Health Research Centre, Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland. niina.siitonen@uef.fi
Source
BMC Med Genet. 2011;12:5
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiponectin - blood - genetics
Adult
Body Weight - genetics
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - genetics - physiopathology - prevention & control
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Life Style
Linkage Disequilibrium
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - genetics
Phenotype
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Time Factors
Abstract
Adiponectin, secreted mainly by mature adipocytes, is a protein with insulin-sensitising and anti-atherogenic effects. Human adiponectin is encoded by the ADIPOQ gene on the chromosomal locus 3q27. Variations in ADIPOQ are associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and related phenotypes in several populations. Our aim was to study the association of the ADIPOQ variations with body weight, serum adiponectin concentrations and conversion to T2DM in overweight subjects with impaired glucose tolerance. Moreover, we investigated whether ADIPOQ gene variants modify the effect of lifestyle changes on these traits.
Participants in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study were randomly assigned to a lifestyle intervention group or a control group. Those whose DNA was available (n = 507) were genotyped for ten ADIPOQ single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Associations between SNPs and baseline body weight and serum adiponectin concentrations were analysed using the univariate analysis of variance. The 4-year longitudinal weight data were analysed using linear mixed models analysis and the change in serum adiponectin from baseline to year four was analysed using Kruskal-Wallis test. In addition, the association of SNPs with the risk of developing T2DM during the follow-up of 0-11 (mean 6.34) years was analysed by Cox regression analysis.
rs266729, rs16861205, rs1501299, rs3821799 and rs6773957 associated significantly (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
21219602 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of ADIPOR2 gene variants with cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes risk in individuals with impaired glucose tolerance: the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131047
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2011;10:83
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Niina Siitonen
Leena Pulkkinen
Jaana Lindström
Marjukka Kolehmainen
Ursula Schwab
Johan G Eriksson
Pirjo Ilanne-Parikka
Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Matti Uusitupa
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Nutrition and Food and Health Research Centre, Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland. niina.siitonen@uef.fi
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2011;10:83
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics
Child
Child, Preschool
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Genetic Association Studies - methods
Genetic Variation - genetics
Glucose Intolerance - diagnosis - genetics
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Receptors, Adiponectin - genetics
Abstract
Adiponectin is an adipokine with insulin-sensitising and anti-atherogenic effects. Two receptors for adiponectin, ADIPOR1 and ADIPOR2, have been characterized that mediate effects of adiponectin in various tissues. We examined whether genetic variation in ADIPOR2 predicts the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and/or Type 2 Diabetes (T2DM) in individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) participating the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study (DPS).
CVD morbidity and mortality data were collected during a median follow-up of 10.2 years (range 1-13 years) and conversion from IGT to T2DM was assessed during a median follow-up of 7 years (range 1-11 years). Altogether eight SNPs in the ADIPOR2 locus were genotyped in 484 participants of the DPS. Moreover, the same SNPs were genotyped and the mRNA expression levels of ADIPOR2 were determined in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and subcutaneous adipose tissue samples derived from 56 individuals participating in the Genobin study.
In the DPS population, four SNPs (rs10848554, rs11061937, rs1058322, rs16928751) were associated with CVD risk, and two remained significant (p = 0.014 for rs11061937 and p = 0.020 for rs1058322) when all four were included in the same multi-SNP model. Furthermore, the individuals homozygous for the rare minor alleles of rs11061946 and rs11061973 had increased risk of converting from IGT to T2DM. Allele-specific differences in the mRNA expression levels for the rs1058322 variant were seen in peripheral blood mononuclear cells derived from participants of the Genobin study.
Our results suggest that SNPs in the ADIPOR2 may modify the risk of CVD in individuals with IGT, possibly through alterations in the mRNA expression levels. In addition an independent genetic signal in ADIPOR2 locus may have an impact on the risk of developing T2DM in individuals with IGT.
ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00518167.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21943112 View in PubMed
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Association of the Pro12Ala polymorphism in the PPAR-gamma2 gene with 3-year incidence of type 2 diabetes and body weight change in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189220
Source
Diabetes. 2002 Aug;51(8):2581-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
Virpi I Lindi
Matti I J Uusitupa
Jaana Lindström
Anne Louheranta
Johan G Eriksson
Timo T Valle
Helena Hämäläinen
Pirjo Ilanne-Parikka
Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
Markku Laakso
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Nutrition, University of Kuopio and Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland. virpi.lindi@uku.fi
Source
Diabetes. 2002 Aug;51(8):2581-6
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alanine
Amino Acid Substitution
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Body constitution
Body mass index
Body Weight - genetics
Diabetes Mellitus - prevention & control
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Genotype
Glucose Intolerance - genetics
Humans
Incidence
Insulin - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation, Missense
Polymorphism, Genetic
Proline
Receptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclear - genetics
Regression Analysis
Transcription Factors - genetics
Abstract
The association of the Pro12Ala polymorphism of the PPAR-gamma2 gene with the incidence of type 2 diabetes was investigated in 522 subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) participating in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study. Subjects were randomized to either an intensive diet and exercise group or a control group. By 3 years of intervention, the odds ratio of the development of type 2 diabetes for subjects with the Ala12 allele was 2.11-fold compared with that for subjects with the Pro12Pro genotype (95% CI 1.20-3.72). The risk for type 2 diabetes increased also in subjects who gained weight or belonged to the control group. In the intervention group, subjects with the Ala12Ala genotype lost more weight during the follow-up than subjects with other genotypes (Pro12Pro vs. Ala12Ala P = 0.043), and none of subjects with the Ala12Ala genotype developed type 2 diabetes in this group. In conclusion, the Ala12 allele may predispose to the development of type 2 diabetes in obese subjects with IGT. However, beneficial changes in diet, increases in physical activity, and weight loss may reverse, to some extent, the diabetogenic impact of the Ala12 allele, possibly due to an improved insulin sensitivity.
PubMed ID
12145174 View in PubMed
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Associations between early life stress, self-reported traumatic experiences across the lifespan and leukocyte telomere length in elderly adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258158
Source
Biol Psychol. 2014 Mar;97:35-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Katri Savolainen
Johan G Eriksson
Laura Kananen
Eero Kajantie
Anu-Katriina Pesonen
Kati Heinonen
Katri Räikkönen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Behavioural Sciences, University of Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: katri.savolainen@helsinki.fi.
Source
Biol Psychol. 2014 Mar;97:35-42
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anxiety, Separation - psychology
Biological Markers
Cell Aging
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
DNA - genetics
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology
Middle Aged
Parents
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Stress, Psychological - genetics
Telomere - ultrastructure
Telomere Shortening - physiology
War
Wounds and Injuries - psychology
Abstract
Early life stress (ELS) poses a risk for mental disorders and aging-related diseases. Accelerated biological aging, reflected in shorter leukocyte telomere length (LTL), may underlie these risks. We examined whether objectively recorded ELS and retrospectively self-reported traumatic experiences across the lifespan are associated with LTL in later adulthood. Of 1486 participants, 215 had been exposed to ELS, namely to temporary separation from both parents in childhood. Participants self-reported emotionally or physically traumatic experiences across the lifespan at a mean age of 63.2 years. LTL was measured using a quantitative PCR method at a mean age of 61.5 years. Separation or self-reported traumatic experiences were not associated with LTL. However, separated participants who self-reported traumatic experiences had shorter LTL. Our results suggest that while ELS or self-reported traumatic experiences are not per se associated with LTL measured decades later, ELS may in combination with self-reported traumatic events be associated with accelerated biological aging.
PubMed ID
24530884 View in PubMed
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