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Acceptability of the POWERPLAY Program: A Workplace Health Promotion Intervention for Men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292610
Source
Am J Mens Health. 2017 Nov; 11(6):1809-1822
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2017
Author
Cherisse L Seaton
Joan L Bottorff
John L Oliffe
Margaret Jones-Bricker
Cristina M Caperchione
Steven T Johnson
Paul Sharp
Author Affiliation
1 Institute for Healthy Living and Chronic Disease Prevention, School of Nursing, Faculty of Health and Social Development, University of British Columbia, Kelowna, Canada.
Source
Am J Mens Health. 2017 Nov; 11(6):1809-1822
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
British Columbia
Health Behavior
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Men's health
Middle Aged
Occupational Health
Program Evaluation
Qualitative Research
Surveys and Questionnaires
Workplace
Young Adult
Abstract
The workplace health promotion program, POWERPLAY, was developed, implemented, and comprehensively evaluated among men working in four male-dominated worksites in northern British Columbia, Canada. The purpose of this study was to explore the POWERPLAY program's acceptability and gather recommendations for program refinement. The mixed-method study included end-of-program survey data collected from 103 male POWERPLAY program participants, interviews with workplace leads, and field notes recorded during program implementation. Data analyses involved descriptive statistics for quantitative data and inductive analysis of open-ended questions and qualitative data. Among participants, 70 (69%) reported being satisfied with the program, 51 (51%) perceived the program to be tailored for northern men, 56 (62%) believed the handouts provided useful information, and 75 (74%) would recommend this program to other men. The findings also highlight program implementation experiences with respect to employee engagement, feedback, and recommendations for future delivery. The POWERPLAY program provides an acceptable approach for health promotion that can serve as a model for advancing men's health in other contexts.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28884636 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acceptability of the POWERPLAY Program: A Workplace Health Promotion Intervention for Men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285458
Source
Am J Mens Health. 2017 Sep 01;:1557988317728354
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-01-2017
Author
Cherisse L Seaton
Joan L Bottorff
John L Oliffe
Margaret Jones-Bricker
Cristina M Caperchione
Steven T Johnson
Paul Sharp
Source
Am J Mens Health. 2017 Sep 01;:1557988317728354
Date
Sep-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The workplace health promotion program, POWERPLAY, was developed, implemented, and comprehensively evaluated among men working in four male-dominated worksites in northern British Columbia, Canada. The purpose of this study was to explore the POWERPLAY program's acceptability and gather recommendations for program refinement. The mixed-method study included end-of-program survey data collected from 103 male POWERPLAY program participants, interviews with workplace leads, and field notes recorded during program implementation. Data analyses involved descriptive statistics for quantitative data and inductive analysis of open-ended questions and qualitative data. Among participants, 70 (69%) reported being satisfied with the program, 51 (51%) perceived the program to be tailored for northern men, 56 (62%) believed the handouts provided useful information, and 75 (74%) would recommend this program to other men. The findings also highlight program implementation experiences with respect to employee engagement, feedback, and recommendations for future delivery. The POWERPLAY program provides an acceptable approach for health promotion that can serve as a model for advancing men's health in other contexts.
PubMed ID
28884636 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adolescent constructions of nicotine addiction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180194
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2004 Mar;36(1):22-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Joan L Bottorff
Joy L Johnson
Barbara Moffat
Jeevan Grewal
Pamela A Ratner
Cecilia Kalaw
Author Affiliation
Nursing and Health Behaviour Research Unit, School of Nursing, T201-2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2B5, Canada. bottorff@nursing.ubc.ca
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2004 Mar;36(1):22-39
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Attitude to Health
Behavior, Addictive - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Canada
Causality
Cognitive Dissonance
Concept Formation
Family - psychology
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Motivation
Nursing Methodology Research
Peer Group
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Social Environment
Social Perception
Tobacco Use Disorder - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
The purpose of this qualitative study was to extend our understanding of how adolescents view nicotine addiction. This secondary analysis included 80 open-ended interviews with adolescents with a variety of smoking histories. The transcribed interviews were systematically analyzed to identify salient explanations of nicotine addiction. These explanations presuppose causal pathways of nicotine exposure leading to addiction and include repeated use, the brain and body "getting used to" nicotine, personal weakness, and family influences. A further explanation is that some youths pretend to be addicted to project a "cool" image. These explanations illustrate that some youths see themselves as passive players in the formation of nicotine addiction. The findings can be used in the development of programs to raise youth awareness about nicotine addiction.
PubMed ID
15133917 View in PubMed
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An ethnographic study of tobacco control in hospital settings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168041
Source
Tob Control. 2006 Aug;15(4):317-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Annette S H Schultz
Joan L Bottorff
Joy L Johnson
Author Affiliation
Helen Glass Centre for Nursing, Faculty of Nursing, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. Schultz@UManitoba.ca
Source
Tob Control. 2006 Aug;15(4):317-22
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
British Columbia
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Promotion - methods - organization & administration
Hospitals
Humans
Nurse's Role
Questionnaires
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation - methods
Tobacco Use Disorder - epidemiology - nursing
Abstract
Tobacco control in hospital settings is characterised by a focus on protection strategies and an increasing expectation that health practitioners provide cessation support to patients. While practitioners claim to have positive attitudes toward supporting patient cessation efforts, missed opportunities are the practice norm.
To study hospital workplace culture relevant to tobacco use and control as part of a mixed-methods research project that investigated hospital-based registered nurses' integration of cessation interventions.
The study was conducted at two hospitals situated in British Columbia, Canada. Data collection included 135 hours of field work including observations of ward activities and designated smoking areas, 85 unstructured conversations with nurses, and the collection of patient-care documents on 16 adult in-patient wards.
The findings demonstrate that protection strategies (for example, smoking restrictions) were relatively well integrated into organisational culture and practice activities but the same was not true for cessation strategies. An analysis of resources and documentation relevant to tobacco revealed an absence of support for addressing tobacco use and cessation. Nurses framed patients' tobacco use as a relational issue, a risk to patient safety, and a burden. Furthermore, conversations revealed that nurses tended to possess only a vague awareness of nicotine dependence.
Overcoming challenges to extending tobacco control within hospitals could be enhanced by emphasising the value of addressing patients' tobacco use, raising awareness of nicotine dependence, and improving the availability of resources to address addiction issues.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16885581 View in PubMed
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"Becoming the real me": recovering from anorexia nervosa.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175454
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2005 Feb;26(2):170-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Mary M H Lamoureux
Joan L Bottorff
Author Affiliation
Kelowna Mental Health Centre, Eating Disorders Program, 1340 Ellis Street, Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada V1Y 9N1. mary.lamoureux@interiorhealth.ca
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2005 Feb;26(2):170-88
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anorexia Nervosa - psychology - rehabilitation
Attitude to Health
Behavior Therapy - methods
British Columbia
Convalescence - psychology
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Narration
Questionnaires
Self Care - psychology
Self Efficacy
Time Factors
Women's health
Abstract
We investigated the process of recovery from anorexia nervosa using grounded theory. Open-ended interviews conducted with 9 women who had recovered from anorexia nervosa revealed that recovery focused on rediscovery and redefinition of the self and included the following: (1) seeing the dangers, (2) inching out of anorexia, (3) tolerating exposure without anorexia, (4) gaining perspective by changing the anorexia mindset, and (5) discovering and reclaiming self as "good enough." The process of recovery described in this study may provide a useful framework for helping women understand their own process of recovery efforts. The findings also support therapies that foster therapeutic alliance, acknowledge readiness for change, and promote a senses of autonomy.
PubMed ID
15804915 View in PubMed
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Be known, be available, be mutual: a qualitative ethical analysis of social values in rural palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130916
Source
BMC Med Ethics. 2011;12:19
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Barbara Pesut
Joan L Bottorff
Carole A Robinson
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of British Columbia Okanagan, Kelowna, BC, Canada. barb.pesut@ubc.ca
Source
BMC Med Ethics. 2011;12:19
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Ethical Analysis
Health Policy - trends
Health Services Accessibility - ethics - standards - trends
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Palliative Care - ethics - trends
Qualitative Research
Rural Population
Social Values - ethnology
Abstract
Although attention to healthcare ethics in rural areas has increased, specific focus on rural palliative care is still largely under-studied and under-theorized. The purpose of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of the values informing good palliative care from rural individuals' perspectives.
We conducted a qualitative ethnographic study in four rural communities in Western Canada. Each community had a population of 10, 000 or less and was located at least a three hour travelling distance by car from a specialist palliative care treatment centre. Data were collected over a 2-year period and included 95 interviews, 51 days of field work and 74 hours of direct participant observation where the researchers accompanied rural healthcare providers. Data were analyzed inductively to identify the most prevalent thematic values, and then coded using NVivo.
This study illuminated the core values of knowing and being known, being present and available, and community and mutuality that provide the foundation for ethically good rural palliative care. These values were congruent across the study communities and across the stakeholders involved in rural palliative care. Although these were highly prized values, each came with a corresponding ethical tension. Being known often resulted in a loss of privacy. Being available and present created a high degree of expectation and potential caregiver strain. The values of community and mutuality created entitlement issues, presenting daunting challenges for coordinated change.
The values identified in this study offer the opportunity to better understand common ethical tensions that arise in rural healthcare and key differences between rural and urban palliative care. In particular, these values shed light on problematic health system and health policy changes. When initiatives violate deeply held values and hard won rural capacity to address the needs of their dying members is undermined, there are long lasting negative consequences. The social fabric of rural life is frayed. These findings offer one way to re-conceptualize healthcare decision making through consideration of critical values to support ethically good palliative care in rural settings.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21955451 View in PubMed
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Bingo halls and smoking: perspectives of First Nations women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150673
Source
Health Place. 2009 Dec;15(4):1014-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Joan L Bottorff
Joanne Carey
Roberta Mowatt
Colleen Varcoe
Joy L Johnson
Peter Hutchinson
Debbie Sullivan
Wanda Williams
Dennis Wardman
Author Affiliation
Institute for Healthy Living and Chronic Disease Prevention, University of British Columbia Okanagan, 3333 University Way, Kelowna, BC, Canada V1V 1V7. joan.bottorff@ubc.ca
Source
Health Place. 2009 Dec;15(4):1014-21
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
British Columbia - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Leisure Activities - economics - psychology
Public Facilities
Rural Health
Sex Factors
Smoking - ethnology - psychology
Social Environment
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine bingo halls as a frequent site for exposure to secondhand cigarette smoke for First Nations women in rural communities. Thematic analysis of interviews with key informants, group discussions with young women, and observations in the study communities revealed that smoky bingo halls provided an important refuge from everyday experiences of stress and trauma, as well as increased women's risk for addiction, marginalization, and criticism. The findings illustrate how the bingo economy in isolated, rural First Nation communities influences tobacco use and second-hand smoke exposure, and how efforts to establish smoke-free bingos can be supported.
PubMed ID
19482540 View in PubMed
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Can we move beyond burden and burnout to support the health and wellness of family caregivers to persons with dementia? Evidence from British Columbia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132042
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2012 Jan;20(1):103-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Meredith B Lilly
Carole A Robinson
Susan Holtzman
Joan L Bottorff
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics and Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. meredith.lilly@mcmaster.ca
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2012 Jan;20(1):103-12
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
British Columbia
Burnout, Professional - epidemiology
Caregivers - psychology
Dementia - therapy
Family - psychology
Family Relations
Female
Home Care Services
Humans
Independent living
Male
Middle Aged
Qualitative Research
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
After more than a decade of concerted effort by policy-makers in Canada and elsewhere to encourage older adults to age at home, there is recognition that the ageing-in-place movement has had unintended negative consequences for family members who care for seniors. This paper outlines findings of a qualitative descriptive study to investigate the health and wellness and support needs of family caregivers to persons with dementia in the Canadian policy environment. Focus groups were conducted in 2010 with 23 caregivers and the health professionals who support them in three communities in the Southern Interior of British Columbia. Thematic analysis guided by the constant comparison technique revealed two overarching themes: (1) forgotten: abandoned to care alone and indefinitely captures the perceived consequences of caregivers' failed efforts to receive recognition and adequate services to support their care-giving and (2) unrealistic expectations for caregiver self-care relates to the burden of expectations for caregivers to look after themselves. Although understanding about the concepts of caregiver burden and burnout is now quite developed, the broader sociopolitical context giving rise to these negative consequences for caregivers to individuals with dementia has not improved. If anything, the Canadian homecare policy environment has placed caregivers in more desperate circumstances. A fundamental re-orientation towards caregivers and caregiver supports is necessary, beginning with viewing caregivers as a critical health human resource in a system that depends on their contributions in order to function. This re-orientation can create a space for providing caregivers with preventive supports, rather than resorting to costly patient care for caregivers who have reached the point of burnout and care recipients who have been institutionalised.
PubMed ID
21851447 View in PubMed
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Case studies of power and control related to tobacco use during pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161937
Source
Womens Health Issues. 2007 Sep-Oct;17(5):325-32
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lorraine Greaves
Cecilia Kalaw
Joan L Bottorff
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Centre of Excellence for Women's Health, Vancouver, BC Canada. lgreaves@cw.bc.ca
Source
Womens Health Issues. 2007 Sep-Oct;17(5):325-32
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anecdotes as Topic
Canada
Female
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Maternal Behavior - psychology
Maternal Health Services - organization & administration
Mothers - psychology
Power (Psychology)
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - prevention & control - psychology
Questionnaires
Smoking - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
The objective was to identify and describe elements of power and control evident in couple tobacco-related interaction patterns during pregnancy.
Using a case study approach, elements of the Duluth Abuse Intervention Project Power and Control Wheel were used to examine women's experiences of tobacco reduction during pregnancy and post partum. Three cases were selected from a larger qualitative sample, using a maximum variation sampling approach.
Although no direct evidence of partner abuse or violence accompanying partner efforts to influence women's smoking was described, most of the elements of power and control were present in the case study, and appeared to cause an emotional toll and a negative impact on women's ability to freely express their views about their own tobacco use.
Elements of power and control, however subtle, are potentially important and unrecognized dimensions of women's tobacco reduction experiences. Additional care and attention should be taken in designing tobacco reduction interventions and policies directed at pregnant and post partum women and their partners to reduce the possibility that these interventions may contribute to the use of power and control.
Notes
Comment In: Womens Health Issues. 2007 Nov-Dec;17(6):383-4; author reply 384-518042487
PubMed ID
17692535 View in PubMed
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Connecting humor, health, and masculinities at prostate cancer support groups.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153214
Source
Psychooncology. 2009 Sep;18(9):916-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
John L Oliffe
John Ogrodniczuk
Joan L Bottorff
T Gregory Hislop
Michael Halpin
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, BC, Canada. john.oliffe@nursing.ubc.ca
Source
Psychooncology. 2009 Sep;18(9):916-26
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Death
British Columbia
Defense Mechanisms
Erectile Dysfunction - psychology
Female
Gender Identity
Health promotion
Humans
Illness Behavior
Laughter
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications - psychology
Prostatic Neoplasms - psychology
Self Disclosure
Self-Help Groups
Social Identification
Urinary Incontinence - psychology
Wit and Humor as Topic
Abstract
Many commentaries about men's health practices and masculinities indicate that men do not typically engage with self-health or acknowledge illness, let alone openly discuss their health concerns with other men. Prostate cancer support groups (PCSGs) appear to run contrary to such ideals, yet the factors that influence men's attendance and engagement at group meetings are poorly understood. As part of a larger PCSG study, we noticed that humor was central to many group interactions and this prompted us to examine the connections between humor, health, and masculinities.
A qualitative ethnographic design was used to direct fieldwork and conduct participant observations at the meetings of 16 PCSGs in British Columbia, Canada. Individual semi-structured interviews were completed with 54 men who attended PCSGs to better understand their perceptions about the use of humor at group meetings.
Four themes, disarming stoicism, marking the boundaries, rekindling and reformulating men's sexuality, and when humor goes south were drawn from the analyses. Overall, humor was used to promote inclusiveness, mark the boundaries for providing and receiving mutual help, and develop masculine group norms around men's sexuality. Although there were many benefits to humor there were also some instances when well-intended banter caused discomfort for attendees.
The importance of group leadership was central to preserving the benefits of humor, and the specificities of how humor is used at PCSGs may provide direction for clinical practice and the design of future community-based men's health promotion programs.
PubMed ID
19137527 View in PubMed
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65 records – page 1 of 7.