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Age as a determinant for dissemination of seasonal and pandemic influenza: an open cohort study of influenza outbreaks in Östergötland County, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126516
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(2):e31746
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Toomas Timpka
Olle Eriksson
Armin Spreco
Elin A Gursky
Magnus Strömgren
Einar Holm
Joakim Ekberg
Orjan Dahlström
Lars Valter
Henrik Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Östergötland County Council, Linköping, Sweden. toomas.timpka@liu.se
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(2):e31746
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - physiopathology
Male
Regression Analysis
Seasons
Sweden
Abstract
An understanding of the occurrence and comparative timing of influenza infections in different age groups is important for developing community response and disease control measures. This study uses data from a Scandinavian county (population 427.000) to investigate whether age was a determinant for being diagnosed with influenza 2005-2010 and to examine if age was associated with case timing during outbreaks. Aggregated demographic data were collected from Statistics Sweden, while influenza case data were collected from a county-wide electronic health record system. A logistic regression analysis was used to explore whether case risk was associated with age and outbreak. An analysis of variance was used to explore whether day for diagnosis was also associated to age and outbreak. The clinical case data were validated against case data from microbiological laboratories during one control year. The proportion of cases from the age groups 10-19 (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
22384066 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cell phone-supported cognitive behavioural therapy for anxiety disorders: a protocol for effectiveness studies in frontline settings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138004
Source
BMC Med Res Methodol. 2011;11:3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Joakim Ekberg
Toomas Timpka
Magnus Bång
Anders Fröberg
Karin Halje
Henrik Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. joakim.ekberg@liu.se
Source
BMC Med Res Methodol. 2011;11:3
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - therapy
Cellular Phone
Clinical Protocols
Cognitive Therapy
Female
Humans
Intention to Treat Analysis
Male
Sweden
Telemedicine
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Reviews of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders have reported large pre- to post-treatment within-group effect sizes on measures of anxiety when supplied in therapist consultations and in technology-supported settings. However, the stringent experimental control of RCTs results in a lack of external validity, which limits the generalizability of findings to real-world frontline clinical practice. We set out to examine the specification of a protocol for study of the effectiveness of cell phone-supported CBT for in situ management of anxiety disorders.
Nominal group methods were used for requirements analysis and protocol design. Making a distinction between different forms of technology-supported therapy, examination of therapists' role, and implementing trials in existing organizational and community contexts were found to be the central requirements in the protocol.
The resulting protocol (NCT01205191 at clinicaltrials.gov) for use in frontline clinical practice in which effectiveness, adherence, and the role of the therapists are analyzed, provides evidence for what are truly valuable cell phone-supported CBT treatments and guidance for the broader introduction of CBT in health services.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21219593 View in PubMed
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Choice of measure matters: A study of the relationship between socioeconomic status and psychosocial resources in a middle-aged normal population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286510
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(8):e0178929
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Karin Festin
Kristin Thomas
Joakim Ekberg
Margareta Kristenson
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(8):e0178929
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Employment
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Social Class
Sweden
Abstract
Psychosocial resources may serve as an important link to explain socioeconomic differences in health. Earlier studies have demonstrated that education, income and occupational status cannot be used interchangeably as indicators of a hypothetical latent social dimension. In the same manner, it is important to disentangle the effect of measuring different constructs of psychosocial resources. The aim of this study was therefore to analyse if associations between socioeconomic status (SES) and psychosocial resources differ depending on the measures used. A cross-sectional population-based study of a random sample (n = 1007) of middle-aged individuals (45-69 years old, 50% women) in Sweden was performed using questionnaire and register data. SES was measured as education, occupation, household income and self-rated economy. Psychosocial resources were measured as social integration, social support, mastery, self-esteem, sense of coherence (SOC) and trust. Logistic regression models were applied to analyse the relationships controlling for the effects of possible confounders. The measures of SES were low or moderately correlated to each other as were the measures of psychosocial resources. After controlling for age, sex, country of birth and employment status, household income and self-rated economy were associated with all six psychosocial resources; occupation was associated with three (social integration, self-esteem and trust) and education with two (social integration and self-esteem). Social integration and self-esteem showed a significant and graded relationship with all SES measures; trust was associated with all SES measures except education, whereas SOC and mastery were only associated with household income and self-rated economy. After controlling for other SES measures, no associations with psychosocial resources remained for education or occupation. In conclusion, associations between SES and psychosocial resources did differ depending on the measures used. The findings illustrate the importance of the choice of measure when investigating SES as well as psychosocial resources.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28832585 View in PubMed
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Design of an online health-promoting community: negotiating user community needs with public health goals and service capabilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112480
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2013;13:258
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Joakim Ekberg
Toomas Timpka
Marianne Angbratt
Linda Frank
Anna-Maria Norén
Lena Hedin
Emelie Andersen
Elin A Gursky
Boel Andersson Gäre
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, SE-581 83, Linköping, Sweden. joakim.ekberg@liu.se
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2013;13:258
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Community-Based Participatory Research
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health promotion
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Information Dissemination
Internet
Male
Obesity - prevention & control
Personal Satisfaction
Public Health
Students - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
An online health-promoting community (OHPC) has the potential to promote health and advance new means of dialogue between public health representatives and the general public. The aim of this study was to examine what aspects of an OHPC that are critical for satisfying the needs of the user community and public health goals and service capabilities.
Community-based participatory research methods were used for data collection and analysis, and participatory design principles to develop a case study OHPC for adolescents. Qualitative data from adolescents on health appraisals and perspectives on health information were collected in a Swedish health service region and classified into categories of user health information exchange needs. A composite design rationale for the OHPC was completed by linking the identified user needs, user-derived requirements, and technical and organizational systems solutions. Conflicts between end-user requirements and organizational goals and resources were identified.
The most prominent health information needs were associated to food, exercise, and well-being. The assessment of the design rationale document and prototype in light of the regional public health goals and service capabilities showed that compromises were needed to resolve conflicts involving the management of organizational resources and responsibilities. The users wanted to discuss health issues with health experts having little time to set aside to the OHPC and it was unclear who should set the norms for the online discussions.
OHPCs can be designed to satisfy both the needs of user communities and public health goals and service capabilities. Compromises are needed to resolve conflicts between users' needs to discuss health issues with domain experts and the management of resources and responsibilities in public health organizations.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23826944 View in PubMed
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Design of a protocol for large-scale epidemiological studies in individual sports: the Swedish Athletics injury study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143454
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2010 Dec;44(15):1106-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Jenny Jacobsson
Toomas Timpka
Joakim Ekberg
Jan Kowalski
Sverker Nilsson
Per Renström
Author Affiliation
PT Section of Social Medicine and Public Health, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. jenny.jacobsson@liu.se
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2010 Dec;44(15):1106-11
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology
Child
Data Collection
Epidemiologic Studies
Humans
Medical Records
Questionnaires
Research Design
Sweden
Terminology as Topic
Young Adult
Abstract
Epidemiological studies have mainly been performed on team sports. The authors set out to develop a protocol for large-scale epidemiological studies of injuries among elite athletics athletes.
An argument-based method for investigation of complex design problems was used to structure the collection and analysis of data. Specification of the protocol was preceded by an examination of requirements on injury surveillance in individual sports and iterated drafting of protocol specifications, and followed by formative evaluations.
The requirements analysis shows that the central demand on the protocol is to allow for detailed epidemiological analyses of overuse injuries, which subsequently requires regular collection of self-reported data from athletes. The resulting study protocol is centred on a web-based weekly athlete e-diary enabling continual collection of individual-level data on exposure and injuries. To be able to interpret the self-reported data on injury events, collection of a wide range of personal baseline data from the athlete, including a psychological profile, is included in the protocol.
The resulting protocol can be employed in intervention programmes that can prevent suffering among both adult elite and youth talent athletes who have made considerable life investments in their sport.
PubMed ID
20484318 View in PubMed
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Injury patterns in Swedish elite athletics: annual incidence, injury types and risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115099
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2013 Oct;47(15):941-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Jenny Jacobsson
Toomas Timpka
Jan Kowalski
Sverker Nilsson
Joakim Ekberg
Örjan Dahlström
Per A Renström
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, , Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2013 Oct;47(15):941-52
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Musculoskeletal System - injuries
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To estimate the incidence, type and severity of musculoskeletal injuries in youth and adult elite athletics athletes and to explore risk factors for sustaining injuries.
Prospective cohort study conducted during a 52-week period.
Male and female youth and adult athletics athletes ranked in the top 10 in Sweden (n=292).
199 (68%) athletes reported an injury during the study season. Ninety-six per cent of the reported injuries were non-traumatic (associated with overuse). Most injuries (51%) were severe, causing a period of absence from normal training exceeding 3 weeks. Log-rank tests revealed risk differences with regard to athlete category (p=0.046), recent previous injury (>3 weeks time-loss; p=0.039) and training load rank index (TLRI; p=0.019). Cox proportional hazards regression analyses showed that athletes in the third (HR 1.79; 95% CI 1.54 to 2.78) and fourth TLRI quartiles (HR 1.79; 95% CI 1.16 to 2.74) had almost a twofold increased risk of injury compared with their peers in the first quartile and interaction effects between athlete category and previous injury; youth male athletes with a previous serious injury had more than a fourfold increased risk of injury (HR=4.39; 95% CI 2.20 to 8.77) compared with youth females with no previous injury.
The injury incidence among both youth and adult elite athletics athletes is high. A training load index combing hours and intensity and a history of severe injury the previous year were predictors for injury. Further studies on measures to quantify training content and protocols for safe return to athletics are warranted.
PubMed ID
23543425 View in PubMed
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Injury rates and risk-factors associated with eventing: a total cohort study of injury events among adult Swedish eventing athletes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135053
Source
Int J Inj Contr Saf Promot. 2011 Dec;18(4):261-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Joakim Ekberg
Toomas Timpka
Henrik Ramel
Lars Valter
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. joakim.ekberg@liu.se
Source
Int J Inj Contr Saf Promot. 2011 Dec;18(4):261-7
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Cumulative Trauma Disorders - epidemiology
Female
Horses
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Severity of Illness Index
Statistics as Topic
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine injury events and risk-factors among Swedish adult eventing athletes. A cross-sectional study design with retrospective recording of 1-year sports-specific exposure and injury data was used. The invited study population consisted of all members of the Swedish Equestrian Federation with eventing as their primary discipline (n = 513). The participation rate was 70.0%. The total 1-year injury prevalence was 26.6%; the specific 1-year prevalence of traumatic injury was 19.3% and of overuse injury 10.9%. The incidence of traumatic injury events was 0.54 injury events/1000 eventing hours (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.35-0.73 injury events/1000 eventing hours) for novices and 0.35 injury events/1000 eventing hours for qualified riders (95% CI, 0.21-0.49 injury events/1000 eventing hours). A total of 27.9% of the traumatic injury events led to severe injuries (causing more than 3 weeks absence from riding). Attitude to risk-taking was the only factor predicting an athlete becoming injured (p = 0.023), and qualification level was the only risk factor for additional injuries among injured riders (p = 0.003). Our results suggest that injury prevention programs in eventing should also give attention to overuse injuries and that care should be taken when eventing athletes are licensed into higher qualification groups.
PubMed ID
21512929 View in PubMed
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Intentions to perform non-pharmaceutical protective behaviors during influenza outbreaks in Sweden: a cross-sectional study following a mass vaccination campaign.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260868
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(3):e91060
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Toomas Timpka
Armin Spreco
Elin Gursky
Olle Eriksson
Örjan Dahlström
Magnus Strömgren
Joakim Ekberg
Sofie Pilemalm
David Karlsson
Jorma Hinkula
Einar Holm
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(3):e91060
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Demography
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Hand Disinfection
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Intention
Logistic Models
Male
Mass Vaccination
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Self Report
Sweden - epidemiology
Transportation
Trust
Abstract
Failure to incorporate the beliefs and attitudes of the public into theoretical models of preparedness has been identified as a weakness in strategies to mitigate infectious disease outbreaks. We administered a cross-sectional telephone survey to a representative sample (n = 443) of the Swedish adult population to examine whether self-reported intentions to improve personal hygiene and increase social distancing during influenza outbreaks could be explained by trust in official information, self-reported health (SF-8), sociodemographic factors, and determinants postulated in protection motivation theory, namely threat appraisal and coping appraisal. The interviewees were asked to make their appraisals for two scenarios: a) an influenza with low case fatality and mild lifestyle impact; b) severe influenza with high case fatality and serious disturbances of societal functions. Every second respondent (50.0%) reported high trust in official information about influenza. The proportion that reported intentions to take deliberate actions to improve personal hygiene during outbreaks ranged between 45-85%, while less than 25% said that they intended to increase social distancing. Multiple logistic regression models with coping appraisal as the explanatory factor most frequently contributing to the explanation of the variance in intentions showed strong discriminatory performance for staying home while not ill (mild outbreaks: Area under the curve [AUC] 0.85 (95% confidence interval 0.82;0.89), severe outbreaks AUC 0.82 (95% CI 0.77;0.85)) and acceptable performance with regard to avoiding public transportation (AUC 0.78 (0.74;0.82), AUC 0.77 (0.72;0.82)), using handwash products (AUC 0.70 (0.65;0.75), AUC 0.76 (0.71;0.80)), and frequently washing hands (AUC 0.71 (0.66;0.76), AUC 0.75 (0.71;0.80)). We conclude that coping appraisal was the explanatory factor most frequently included in statistical models explaining self-reported intentions to carry out non-pharmaceutical health actions in the Swedish outlined context, and that variations in threat appraisal played a smaller role in these models despite scientific uncertainties surrounding a recent mass vaccination campaign.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24608557 View in PubMed
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Performance of eHealth data sources in local influenza surveillance: a 5-year open cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257563
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2014;16(4):e116
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Toomas Timpka
Armin Spreco
Örjan Dahlström
Olle Eriksson
Elin Gursky
Joakim Ekberg
Eva Blomqvist
Magnus Strömgren
David Karlsson
Henrik Eriksson
James Nyce
Jorma Hinkula
Einar Holm
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. toomas.timpka@liu.se.
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2014;16(4):e116
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Data Collection
Disease Outbreaks
Health Information Systems
Humans
Infant
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza A Virus, H3N2 Subtype
Influenza, Human - epidemiology
Internet
Mass Media
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Search Engine
Sweden - epidemiology
Telemedicine
Young Adult
Abstract
There is abundant global interest in using syndromic data from population-wide health information systems--referred to as eHealth resources--to improve infectious disease surveillance. Recently, the necessity for these systems to achieve two potentially conflicting requirements has been emphasized. First, they must be evidence-based; second, they must be adjusted for the diversity of populations, lifestyles, and environments.
The primary objective was to examine correlations between data from Google Flu Trends (GFT), computer-supported telenursing centers, health service websites, and influenza case rates during seasonal and pandemic influenza outbreaks. The secondary objective was to investigate associations between eHealth data, media coverage, and the interaction between circulating influenza strain(s) and the age-related population immunity.
An open cohort design was used for a five-year study in a Swedish county (population 427,000). Syndromic eHealth data were collected from GFT, telenursing call centers, and local health service website visits at page level. Data on mass media coverage of influenza was collected from the major regional newspaper. The performance of eHealth data in surveillance was measured by correlation effect size and time lag to clinically diagnosed influenza cases.
Local media coverage data and influenza case rates showed correlations with large effect sizes only for the influenza A (A) pH1N1 outbreak in 2009 (r=.74, 95% CI .42-.90; P
Notes
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PubMed ID
24776527 View in PubMed
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Population-based simulations of influenza pandemics: validity and significance for public health policy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150109
Source
Bull World Health Organ. 2009 Apr;87(4):305-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Toomas Timpka
Henrik Eriksson
Elin A Gursky
James M Nyce
Magnus Morin
Johan Jenvald
Magnus Strömgren
Einar Holm
Joakim Ekberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sweden. tti@ida.liu.se
Source
Bull World Health Organ. 2009 Apr;87(4):305-11
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antiviral Agents - supply & distribution - therapeutic use
Computer simulation
Disease Outbreaks
Health Planning - methods
Health Policy
Humans
Influenza, Human - drug therapy - epidemiology
Public Health - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To examine the validity and usefulness of pandemic simulations aimed at informing practical decision-making in public health.
We recruited a multidisciplinary group of nine experts to assess a case-study simulation of influenza transmission in a Swedish county. We used a non-statistical nominal group technique to generate evaluations of the plausibility, formal validity (verification) and predictive validity of the simulation. A health-effect assessment structure was used as a framework for data collection.
The unpredictability of social order during disasters was not adequately addressed by simulation methods; even minor disruptions of the social order may invalidate key infrastructural assumptions underpinning current pandemic simulation models. Further, a direct relationship between model flexibility and computation time was noted. Consequently, simulation methods cannot, in practice, support integrated modifications of microbiological, epidemiological and spatial submodels or handle multiple parallel scenarios.
The combination of incomplete surveillance data and simulation methods that neglect social dynamics limits the ability of national public health agencies to provide policy-makers and the general public with the critical and timely information needed during a pandemic.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19551239 View in PubMed
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