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Association of varying number of doses of quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine with incidence of condyloma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104998
Source
JAMA. 2014 Feb 12;311(6):597-603
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-12-2014
Author
Eva Herweijer
Amy Leval
Alexander Ploner
Sandra Eloranta
Julia Fridman Simard
Joakim Dillner
Eva Netterlid
Pär Sparén
Lisen Arnheim-Dahlström
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
JAMA. 2014 Feb 12;311(6):597-603
Date
Feb-12-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Cohort Studies
Condylomata Acuminata - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Human papillomavirus 11
Human papillomavirus 6
Humans
Incidence
Papillomavirus Infections - prevention & control
Papillomavirus Vaccines - administration & dosage
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - prevention & control
Vaccination - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Determining vaccine dose-level protection is essential to minimize program costs and increase mass vaccination program feasibility. Currently, a 3-dose vaccination schedule is recommended for both the quadrivalent and bivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines. Although the primary goal of HPV vaccination programs is to prevent cervical cancer, condyloma related to HPV types 6 and 11 is also prevented with the quadrivalent vaccine and represents the earliest measurable preventable disease outcome for the HPV vaccine.
To examine the association between quadrivalent HPV vaccination and first occurrence of condyloma in relation to vaccine dose in a population-based setting.
An open cohort of all females aged 10 to 24 years living in Sweden (n?=?1,045,165) was followed up between 2006 and 2010 for HPV vaccination and first occurrence of condyloma using the Swedish nationwide population-based health data registers.
Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and incidence rate differences (IRDs) of condyloma were estimated using Poisson regression with vaccine dose as a time-dependent exposure, adjusting for attained age and parental education, and stratified on age at first vaccination. To account for prevalent infections, models included a buffer period of delayed case counting.
A total of 20,383 incident cases of condyloma were identified during follow-up, including 322 cases after receipt of at least 1 dose of the vaccine. For individuals aged 10 to 16 years at first vaccination, receipt of 3 doses was associated with an IRR of 0.18 (95% CI, 0.15-0.22) for condyloma, whereas receipt of 2 doses was associated with an IRR of 0.29 (95% CI, 0.21-0.40). One dose was associated with an IRR of 0.31 (95% CI, 0.20-0.49), which corresponds to an IRD of 384 cases (95% CI, 305-464) per 100,000 person-years, compared with no vaccination. The corresponding IRDs for 2 doses were 400 cases (95% CI, 346-454) and for 3 doses, 459 cases (95% CI, 437-482). The number of prevented cases between 3 and 2 doses was 59 (95% CI, 2-117) per 100,000 person-years.
Although maximum reduction in condyloma risk was seen after receipt of 3 doses of quadrivalent HPV vaccine, receipt of 2 vaccine doses was also associated with a considerable reduction in condyloma risk. The implications of these findings for the relationship between number of vaccine doses and cervical cancer risk require further investigation.
Notes
Comment In: JAMA. 2014 Jun 18;311(23):243924938569
Comment In: JAMA. 2014 Jun 18;311(23):2439-4024938570
PubMed ID
24519299 View in PubMed
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Bereavement Is Associated with an Increased Risk of HPV Infection and Cervical Cancer: An Epidemiological Study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273864
Source
Cancer Res. 2016 Feb 1;76(3):643-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-2016
Author
Donghao Lu
Karin Sundström
Pär Sparén
Katja Fall
Arvid Sjölander
Joakim Dillner
Nathalie Ylitalo Helm
Hans-Olov Adami
Unnur Valdimarsdóttir
Fang Fang
Source
Cancer Res. 2016 Feb 1;76(3):643-51
Date
Feb-1-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bereavement
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Papillomaviridae - isolation & purification
Papillomavirus Infections - epidemiology - pathology - psychology
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - psychology - virology
Abstract
Grief over the loss of a family member may cause physical and mental illness, but an association between bereavement and cancer risk has not been established. Based on the Swedish National Cervical Screening Register (1969-2011) including 14,011,269 smears from 2,466,107 women, we conducted two nested case-control studies to examine the associations of bereavement (i.e., loss of a family member due to death) with abnormal cytology (390,310 first abnormal and 1,951,319 normal smears) and in situ/invasive cervical cancer (75,128 case and 375,640 control women), both individually matched on year of birth and screening adherence. Among 1,696 of the control women, we further investigated bereavement in association with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, both HPV16 and other HPV types. Bereavement was consistently associated with a 4% to 9% increased risk for first abnormal cytology, in situ and invasive cervical cancer (all P
Notes
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PubMed ID
26634926 View in PubMed
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Biobanks collected for routine healthcare purposes: build-up and use for epidemiologic research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140048
Source
Methods Mol Biol. 2011;675:113-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Joakim Dillner
Kristin Andersson
Author Affiliation
Bio Banking and Molecular Resource, Infrastructure of Sweden (BBMRIse), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Methods Mol Biol. 2011;675:113-25
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Specimen Banks - ethics
Epidemiologic Studies
Finland
Humans
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Registries
Abstract
The routine health services collect large amount of samples for biobanking, particularly in clinical laboratory medicine, mainly for clinical diagnostic purposes. These samples provide a large-scale and clinically relevant biobanking infrastructure that can be used for research if these conditions apply. There must be a system for database management that can obtain data on clinical endpoints, vital status, and additional required information via registry linkages. There must be an appropriate ethical system for handling consent for research use. There should be an active effort to optimize the usefulness of clinical biobanks also for research use. Major steps in this direction include measures to stop the ongoing discarding of old samples, reformatting to minimize pick-up times, external quality assurance and formal accreditation of biobanks, building of a dedicated high-quality database that is regularly used for registry linkages, and considerations on whether usefulness and accessibility for research can be optimized by extended saving or pre-treatment of samples. Systematic clinical biobanking could become a major asset for clinical research and public health if biobanking is considered as a routine part of everyday clinical practice, and the science of biobanking is considered an essential part of the science of laboratory medicine.
PubMed ID
20949385 View in PubMed
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Both high and low levels of blood vitamin D are associated with a higher prostate cancer risk: a longitudinal, nested case-control study in the Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18093
Source
Int J Cancer. 2004 Jan 1;108(1):104-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2004
Author
Pentti Tuohimaa
Leena Tenkanen
Merja Ahonen
Sonja Lumme
Egil Jellum
Göran Hallmans
Pär Stattin
Sverre Harvei
Timo Hakulinen
Tapio Luostarinen
Joakim Dillner
Matti Lehtinen
Matti Hakama
Author Affiliation
Medical School, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. Pentti.Tuohimaa@uta.fi
Source
Int J Cancer. 2004 Jan 1;108(1):104-8
Date
Jan-1-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Calcifediol - blood
Case-Control Studies
Finland
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Prostatic Neoplasms - blood
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Sweden
Vitamin D Deficiency - complications
Abstract
Vitamin D inhibits the development and growth of prostate cancer cells. Epidemiologic results on serum vitamin D levels and prostate cancer risk have, however, been inconsistent. We conducted a longitudinal nested case-control study on Nordic men (Norway, Finland and Sweden) using serum banks of 200,000 samples. We studied serum 25(OH)-vitamin D levels of 622 prostate cancer cases and 1,451 matched controls and found that both low (/=80 nmol/l) 25(OH)-vitamin D serum concentrations are associated with higher prostate cancer risk. The normal average serum concentration of 25(OH)-vitamin D (40-60 nmol/l) comprises the lowest risk of prostate cancer. The U-shaped risk of prostate cancer might be due to similar 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) availability within the prostate: low vitamin D serum concentration apparently leads to a low tissue concentration and to weakened mitotic control of target cells, whereas a high vitamin D level might lead to vitamin D resistance through increased inactivation by enhanced expression of 24-hydroxylase. It is recommended that vitamin D deficiency be supplemented, but too high vitamin D serum level might also enhance cancer development.
Notes
Comment In: Int J Cancer. 2004 Sep 1;111(3):468; author reply 46915221979
Comment In: Int J Cancer. 2004 Sep 1;111(3):470-1; author reply 47215221981
PubMed ID
14618623 View in PubMed
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Cancer risks after solid organ transplantation and after long-term dialysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282593
Source
Int J Cancer. 2017 Mar 01;140(5):1091-1101
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-01-2017
Author
Maria Hortlund
Laila Sara Arroyo Mühr
Hans Storm
Gerda Engholm
Joakim Dillner
Davit Bzhalava
Source
Int J Cancer. 2017 Mar 01;140(5):1091-1101
Date
Mar-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Susceptibility
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Immunocompromised Host
Incidence
Kidney Diseases - immunology - surgery - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Organ Specificity
Organ Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology - immunology
Registries
Renal Dialysis - statistics & numerical data
Risk
Sweden - epidemiology
Transplantation Immunology
Abstract
Immunosuppression involves an inability to control virus infections and increased incidence of virus-associated cancers. Some cancers without known viral etiology are also increased, but data on exactly which cancer forms are increased has been inconsistent. To provide a reliable and generalizable estimate, with high statistical power and long follow-up time, we assessed cancer risks using comprehensive, population-based registries in two different countries and from two different immunosuppressed patient groups (solid organ transplant recipients (OTRs) and long-term dialysis patients (LDPs)). National registries in Denmark and Sweden identified 20,804 OTRs and 31,140 LDPs that were followed up using national cancer registries. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) compared to the general population were estimated. We found highly similar results, both for the two different countries and for the two different immunosuppressed cohorts, namely an increased incidence for the following specific cancer forms: Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and cancers of the lip, kidney, larynx and thyroid. The SIR for overall cancer among OTRs was 3.5 [n?=?2,142, 95% CI, 3.4-3.7] in Sweden, 2.9 [n?=?1,110, 95% CI, 2.8-3.1] in Denmark and 1.6 [n?=?1,713, 95% CI, 1.5-1.6] among LDP. The SIR for NMSC among OTRs was 44.7 [n?=?994, 95% CI, 42-47.5] in Sweden and 41.5 [n?=?445, 95% CI, 37.8-45.5] in Denmark. The increased SIR for NMSC among LDPs was 5.3 [n?=?304, 95% CI, 4.7-5.9]). In summary, an increased SIR for a specific, similar set of cancer forms is consistently found among the immunosuppressed. Conceivable explanations include surveillance bias and immunosuppression-related susceptibility to viral infections.
PubMed ID
27870055 View in PubMed
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Cervical cancer case-control audit: Results from routine evaluation of a nationwide cervical screening program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309493
Source
Int J Cancer. 2020 03 01; 146(5):1230-1240
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-01-2020
Author
Jiangrong Wang
K Miriam Elfström
Bengt Andrae
Sara Nordqvist Kleppe
Alexander Ploner
Jiayao Lei
Joakim Dillner
Karin Sundström
Pär Sparén
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2020 03 01; 146(5):1230-1240
Date
03-01-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Benchmarking - statistics & numerical data
Case-Control Studies
Cervix Uteri - pathology
Early Detection of Cancer - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Mass Screening - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Medical Audit - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Papanicolaou Test - statistics & numerical data
Patient Participation - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Program Evaluation
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Sweden - epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology
Young Adult
Abstract
Our study used a refined case-control cervical cancer Audit framework to investigate effectiveness of cervical screening, with measures of three screening failures: irregular-participation, cervical cancer developed after cytological abnormalities and after normal screening results. The register-based study included 4,254 cervical cancer cases diagnosed in Sweden during 2002-2011, and 30 population-based controls per case. We used conditional logistic regression models to examine relative risks of cervical cancer in relation to screening participation and screening results in the past two screening rounds from 6 months before cancer diagnosis. We found that women unscreened in past two screening rounds showed four times increased risk of cervical cancer compared to women screened in time (OR = 4.1, 95% CI = 3.8-4.5), and women unscreened in the previous round but screened in the most recent round also showed a statistically significantly elevated risk (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.5-1.8). Women having abnormality in previous two rounds exhibited higher risk of cervical cancer compared to women screened with normal results, while having normal results in the subsequent round after the abnormality also yielded an increased risk (OR = 4.0, 95% CI = 3.2-5.1). Being screened with only normal results was associated with 89% risk reduction for squamous cell cancer, compared to women unscreened, but only 60% reduction for adenocarcinoma. Our findings emphasize the importance of routine participation in cervical screening and suggest that management of abnormalities, as well as sensitivity of the test, warrants improvement especially for preventing cervical adenocarcinoma. The Audit framework serves as routine evaluation model and the findings benchmark for future evaluation of changes in screening practice.
PubMed ID
31107987 View in PubMed
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[Cervical cancer has increased in Sweden in women who had a normal cell sample].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298065
Source
Lakartidningen. 2018 06 05; 115:
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
06-05-2018
Author
Joakim Dillner
Pär Sparén
Bengt Andrae
Björn Strander
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet - Laboratory Medicine Stockholm, Sweden Karolinska Institutet - Laboratory Medicine Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Lakartidningen. 2018 06 05; 115:
Date
06-05-2018
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology
Adult
Aged
Female
Humans
Incidence
Mass Screening - methods - standards
Middle Aged
Neoplasms, Squamous Cell - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology
Vaginal Smears
Abstract
Cervical cancer has increased in Sweden in recent years. The increase is 17% in 2014-15 compared to the reference period 2002-13. The increase is largest for adenocarcinoma (+?31%) and shows remarkable differences between counties, from continued incidence decreases to increases of >80%. The increase is seen in most ages that are offered screening, but is confined to early stage cancers and there is no increase in mortality. Population test coverage of screening has increased since 2002. The Swedish National Cervical Screening Registry has analysed the increase in relation to screening history. The most significant increase (+?30%) is seen in women who had a normal cervical smear (P
PubMed ID
29870048 View in PubMed
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Cervical cancer screening in Sweden 2014-2016.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299833
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(12):e0209003
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Maria Hortlund
K Miriam Elfström
Pär Sparén
Pouran Almstedt
Björn Strander
Joakim Dillner
Author Affiliation
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(12):e0209003
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Papillomaviridae - physiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - virology
Young Adult
Abstract
To enable incremental optimization of screening, regular reporting of quality indicators is required.
To report key quality indicators and basic statistics about cervical screening in Sweden.
We collected individual level data on all cervical cytologies, histopathologies, human papillomavirus tests and all invitations for cervical screening in Sweden during 2013-2016.
There were over 2,278,000 cervical samples collected in Sweden in 2014-2016. Organized samples (resulting from an invitation) constituted 69% of samples. The screening test coverage of all resident women aged 23-60 was 82%. The coverage has slowly increased for >10 years. There is large variability between counties (from 71% to 92%) over time. There were 25,725 women with high-grade lesions in cytology during 2013-2015. Only 96% of these women had a follow-up histopathology within a year. Cervical cancer incidence showed an increasing trend.
Key quality indicators such as population coverage and follow-up rates were stable or improving, but there was nevertheless an unexplained cervical cancer increase.
PubMed ID
30557367 View in PubMed
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Chlamydial antibodies and risk of prostate cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17190
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2005 Feb;14(2):385-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Tarja Anttila
Leena Tenkanen
Sonja Lumme
Maija Leinonen
Randi Elin Gislefoss
Göran Hallmans
Steinar Thoresen
Timo Hakulinen
Tapio Luostarinen
Pär Stattin
Pekka Saikku
Joakim Dillner
Matti Lehtinen
Matti Hakama
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2005 Feb;14(2):385-9
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Case-Control Studies
Chlamydia Infections - complications - diagnosis
Chlamydia trachomatis - immunology
Chlamydophila Infections - complications - diagnosis
Chlamydophila pneumoniae - immunology
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prostatic Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology - microbiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: We assessed the risk of prostate cancer by exposure to Chlamydia trachomatis. METHOD: Seven hundred thirty eight cases of prostate cancer and 2,271 matched controls were identified from three serum sample banks in Finland, Norway, and Sweden by linkage to the population based cancer registries. RESULTS: A statistically significant inverse association (odds ratio, 0.69; 95% confidence interval, 0.51-0.94) was found. It was consistent by different serotypes and there was a consistent dose-response relationship. CONCLUSION: C. trachomatis infection is not likely to increase the risk of prostate cancer. Whether the inverse relationship is true or due to difficulties in measuring the true exposure in prostatic tissue by serology, confounders or other sources of error remain open.
PubMed ID
15734962 View in PubMed
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Chlamydia trachomatis infection and persistence of human papillomavirus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17157
Source
Int J Cancer. 2005 Aug 10;116(1):110-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-10-2005
Author
Ilvars Silins
Walter Ryd
Anders Strand
Göran Wadell
Sven Törnberg
Bengt Göran Hansson
Xiaohong Wang
Lisen Arnheim
Viktor Dahl
Daniel Bremell
Kenneth Persson
Joakim Dillner
Eva Rylander
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Microbiology, Lund University, University Hospital at Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2005 Aug 10;116(1):110-5
Date
Aug-10-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia - etiology
Chlamydia Infections - complications
Chlamydia trachomatis - isolation & purification
Cohort Studies
DNA, Viral - analysis
Female
Humans
Mass Screening
Papillomavirus Infections - complications
Papillomavirus, Human
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Time Factors
Tumor Virus Infections - complications
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - etiology
Vaginal Smears
Abstract
Human papillomavirus (HPV) persistence is the major cause of cervical cancer, but most HPV infections will not persist and risk factors for HPV persistence are not well known. Chlamydia (C.) trachomatis infection seems to also be associated with cervical cancer. We investigated whether C. trachomatis infection is a risk factor for HPV persistence. In a cohort of 12,527 women participating in a population-based HPV screening trial in Sweden, 6,418 women completed testing for HPV DNA by general primer PCR and typing by reverse dot blot hybridization. On average 19 months later, 303 women that had been HPV-positive and had normal cytology at enrollment completed a new HPV test. Environmental exposures were assessed by an 87-item questionnaire. Previous sexually transmitted infections were also investigated by serology. At follow-up, 44% of the women were positive for the same type of HPV DNA as at enrollment. Persistence correlated with length of follow-up (p
PubMed ID
15756673 View in PubMed
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94 records – page 1 of 10.