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AGRICOH: A Consortium of Agricultural Cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100928
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2011 May;8(5):1341-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Maria E Leon
Laura E Beane Freeman
Jeroen Douwes
Jane A Hoppin
Hans Kromhout
Pierre Lebailly
Karl-Christian Nordby
Marc Schenker
Joachim Schüz
Stephen C Waring
Michael C R Alavanja
Isabella Annesi-Maesano
Isabelle Baldi
Mohamed Aqiel Dalvie
Giles Ferro
Béatrice Fervers
Hilde Langseth
Leslie London
Charles F Lynch
John McLaughlin
James A Merchant
Punam Pahwa
Torben Sigsgaard
Leslie Stayner
Catharina Wesseling
Keun-Young Yoo
Shelia H Zahm
Kurt Straif
Aaron Blair
Author Affiliation
Section of Environment and Radiation, International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, 69372 Lyon CEDEX 08, France; E-Mails: schuzj@iarc.fr (J.S.); ferro@iarc.fr (G.F.); straif@iarc.fr (K.S.).
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2011 May;8(5):1341-57
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
AGRICOH is a recently formed consortium of agricultural cohort studies involving 22 cohorts from nine countries in five continents: South Africa (1), Canada (3), Costa Rica (2), USA (6), Republic of Korea (1), New Zealand (2), Denmark (1), France (3) and Norway (3). The aim of AGRICOH, initiated by the US National Cancer Institute (NCI) and coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), is to promote and sustain collaboration and pooling of data to investigate the association between a wide range of agricultural exposures and a wide range of health outcomes, with a particular focus on associations that cannot easily be addressed in individual studies because of rare exposures (e.g., use of infrequently applied chemicals) or relatively rare outcomes (e.g., certain types of cancer, neurologic and auto-immune diseases). To facilitate future projects the need for data harmonization of selected variables is required and is underway. Altogether, AGRICOH provides excellent opportunities for studying cancer, respiratory, neurologic, and auto-immune diseases as well as reproductive and allergic disorders, injuries and overall mortality in association with a wide array of exposures, prominent among these the application of pesticides.
PubMed ID
21655123 View in PubMed
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Atopic and non-atopic asthma in a farming and a general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15135
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2004 Oct;46(4):396-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Wijnand Eduard
Ernst Omenaas
Per Sigvald Bakke
Jeroen Douwes
Dick Heederik
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Occupational Health, Oslo, Norway. Winjuad.Eduard@stami.no
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2004 Oct;46(4):396-9
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Agricultural Workers' Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - immunology
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology - immunology
Comparative Study
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology - etiology - immunology
Endotoxins - immunology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Rural Population
Spores, Fungal - immunology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In a previous study inverse associations between asthma and exposure to fungal spores and endotoxins in atopic farmers and positive associations with the same factors in non-atopic farmers were documented. No external reference population had been included. We, therefore, compared this farming population with the general population from an adjacent region. METHODS: Random samples of a farming (n=2,106) and a rural (n=351) and urban (n=727) general population were selected. Atopy was assessed by serum IgE and asthma by questionnaires. RESULTS: The asthma prevalence was 4.0% among farmers, 5.7% in the rural, and 7.6% in the urban population. Atopy was similar (9-10%). Most asthmatics were not atopic, 67-75%. Farmers had asthma less often than the general population OR 0.52 (95% CI 0.36-0.75); both atopic (OR 0.33 (95% CI 0.15-0.69)) and non-atopic asthma (OR 0.60 (95% CI 0.39-0.93)). CONCLUSION: This may indicate a protective effect of the farm environment on asthma but a healthy worker effect may also play a role.
PubMed ID
15376208 View in PubMed
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Body mass index and childhood asthma: a linear association?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156259
Source
J Asthma. 2008 Aug;45(6):473-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Fortune Sithole
Jeroen Douwes
Igor Burstyn
Paul Veugelers
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
J Asthma. 2008 Aug;45(6):473-7
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Body mass index
Child
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity - complications
Male
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Obesity - complications
Overweight - complications
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Our objective was to characterize the association between body mass index (BMI) and childhood asthma while adjusting for individual and neighborhood socioeconomic factors. Data were obtained from 3,804 students 10 to 11 years of age in Nova Scotia, Canada. Asthma was defined as parent-reported doctor-diagnosed asthma or bronchitis. Smoothed curves suggested a linear association between BMI and asthma with a 6 % increase in prevalence per unit increase of BMI. This association was independent of allergies, sex, and socioeconomic factors. Girls from socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhoods were less likely to be asthmatic as were boys from well-educated and wealthy families.
PubMed ID
18612899 View in PubMed
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Can selection explain the protective effects of farming on asthma?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274438
Source
Ann Agric Environ Med. 2015;22(3):467-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Wijnand Eduard
Vivi Schlünssen
Torben Sigsgaard
Øyvind Omland
Neil Pearce
Jeroen Douwes
Source
Ann Agric Environ Med. 2015;22(3):467-9
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Agriculture
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Farmers
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Retirement
Selection, Genetic
Siblings
Students
Young Adult
Abstract
Reduced asthma and allergy risks in farmers have been ascribed to microbial exposures. However, selection may also play a role and this was assessed in two Scandinavian farming populations.
Asthma prevalence in 739 Danish farming students was compared to that of 1,105 siblings. 8,482 Norwegian farmers were also compared with 349 early retired farmers.
The prevalence of ever-asthma was 5.4% in farming students and 5.2% in siblings (OR 1.1; 95%CI 0.73-1.7). Current asthma in farmers was 3.0% compared to 6.3% in farmers who had retired early (OR 1.8, 95%CI 1.1-2.9). Adjustments for early retirement increased the asthma prevalence by 0.3-0.6%. Farmers who had changed production were more likely to have asthma (OR 9.8, 95% CI 6.0-16).
No healthy worker selection into farming was observed and changes in asthma prevalence due to early retirement were small. Selection effects are therefore unlikely to explain the protective effects of farming on asthma.
PubMed ID
26403116 View in PubMed
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Chronic bronchitis, COPD, and lung function in farmers: the role of biological agents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151886
Source
Chest. 2009 Sep;136(3):716-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Wijnand Eduard
Neil Pearce
Jeroen Douwes
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Occupational Health, Chemical and Biological Working Environment, Dep Oslo NO-0033, Norway. wijnand.eduard@stami.no.
Source
Chest. 2009 Sep;136(3):716-25
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agricultural Workers' Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Agrochemicals - toxicity
Allergens - analysis
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Bronchitis - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dust
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Respiratory Function Tests
Risk factors
Abstract
Farmers have an increased risk of respiratory morbidity and mortality. The causal agents have not been fully established.
In a cross-sectional study of 4,735 Norwegian farmers, we assessed respiratory symptoms and lung function. Atopy was assessed in a subsample (n = 1,213). Personal exposures to dust, fungal spores, actinomycete spores, endotoxins, bacteria, storage mites, (1-->3)-ss-D-glucans, fungal antigens, organic dust, inorganic dust, silica, ammonia, and hydrogen sulfide were measured for 127 randomly selected farms.
Compared to crop farmers, livestock farmers were more likely to have chronic bronchitis (odds ratio [OR], 1.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4 to 2.6) and COPD (OR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.1 to 1.7). FEV(1) (-41 mL; 95% CI, -75 to -7) was significantly reduced, but FVC (-15 mL; 95% CI, -54 to 24) was not. Exposure to most agents were predictors of respiratory morbidity, except FVC. Ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, and inorganic dust were most strongly associated in multiple regression models adjusted for coexposures, but the effects of specific biological agents could not be assessed in multiple regression models because they were too highly correlated. Farmers with atopy had a significantly lower FEV(1) (OR, -87 mL; 95% CI, -170 to -7), but atopy was not directly associated with chronic bronchitis, COPD, and FVC. However, the effects of farming and specific exposures on COPD were substantially greater in farmers with atopy.
Livestock farmers have an increased risk of chronic bronchitis, COPD, and reduced FEV(1). Ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, inorganic dust, and organic dust may be causally involved, but a role for specific biological agents cannot be excluded. Farmers with atopy appear more susceptible to develop farming-related COPD.
Notes
Comment In: Chest. 2009 Sep;136(3):662-319736187
PubMed ID
19318669 View in PubMed
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Exposure to Wood Dust, Microbial Components, and Terpenes in the Norwegian Sawmill Industry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301953
Source
Ann Work Expo Health. 2018 07 06; 62(6):674-688
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-06-2018
Author
Anne Straumfors
Raymond Olsen
Hanne Line Daae
Anani Afanou
Dave McLean
Marine Corbin
Andrea 't Mannetje
Bente Ulvestad
Berit Bakke
Helle Laier Johnsen
Jeroen Douwes
Wijnand Eduard
Author Affiliation
Department of Chemical and Biological Working Environment, National Institute of Occupational Health, Majorstuen, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Ann Work Expo Health. 2018 07 06; 62(6):674-688
Date
07-06-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Air Microbiology
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis
Dust - analysis
Endotoxins - analysis
Fungi
Humans
Industry
Inhalation Exposure - analysis
Norway
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Terpenes - analysis
Wood - analysis
Abstract
Sawmill workers are exposed to wood dust (a well-known carcinogen), microorganisms, endotoxins, resin acids (diterpenes), and vapours containing terpenes, which may cause skin irritation, allergy, and respiratory symptoms including asthma. The health effects of most of these exposures are poorly understood as most studies measure only wood dust. The present study assessed these exposures in the Norwegian sawmill industry, which processes predominantly spruce and pine. Personal exposures of wood dust, resin acids, endotoxin, fungal spores and fragments, mono-, and sesquiterpenes were measured in 10 departments in 11 saw and planer mills. The geometric mean (GM) and geometric standard deviation (GSD) thoracic exposures were: 0.09 mg m-3 dust (GSD 2.6), 3.0 endotoxin units (EU) m-3 (GSD 4.9), 0.4 × 105 fungal spores m-3 (GSD 4.2), 2 × 105 fungal fragments m-3 (GSD 3.2), and 1560 ng m-3 of resin acids (GSD 5.5). The GM (GSD) inhalable exposures were: 0.72 mg m-3 dust (2.6), 17 EU m-3 (4.3), 0.4 × 105 fungal spores m-3 (3.8), and 7508 ng m-3 (4.4) of resin acids. The overall correlation between the thoracic and inhalable exposure was strong for resin acid (rp = 0.84), but moderate for all other components (rp = 0.34-0.64). The GM (GSD) exposure to monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes were 1105 µg m-3 (7.8) and 40 µg m-3 (3.9), respectively. Although mean exposures were relatively low, the variance was large, with exposures regularly exceeding the recommended occupational exposure limits. The exposures to spores and endotoxins were relatively high in the dry timber departments, but exposures to microbial components and mono-and sesquiterpenes were generally highest in areas where green (undried) timber was handled. Dust and resin acid exposure were highest in the dry areas of the sawmills. Low to moderate correlation between components (rp ranging from 0.02 to 0.65) suggests that investigations of exposure-response associations for these components (both individually and combined) are feasible in future epidemiological studies.
PubMed ID
29878039 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.