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Sleep and use of alcohol and drug in adolescence. A large population-based study of Norwegian adolescents aged 16 to 19 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266678
Source
Drug Alcohol Depend. 2015 Apr 1;149:180-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2015
Author
Børge Sivertsen
Jens Christoffer Skogen
Reidar Jakobsen
Mari Hysing
Source
Drug Alcohol Depend. 2015 Apr 1;149:180-6
Date
Apr-1-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Depression - epidemiology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Self Report
Sleep - physiology
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Changes in sleep patterns and increased substance involvement are common in adolescence, but our knowledge of the nature of their association remains limited. The aim of this study was to examine the association between several sleep problems and sleep behaviours, and use and misuse of alcohol and illicit drugs using data from a large population-based sample.
A large population-based study from Norway conducted in 2012, the youth@hordaland study, surveyed 9328 adolescents aged 16-19 years (54% girls). Self-reported sleep measures provided information on sleep duration, sleep deficit, weekday bedtime and bedtime difference and insomnia. The main dependent variables were frequency and amount of alcohol consumption and illicit drug use, in addition to the presence of alcohol and drug problems as measured by CRAFFT.
The results showed that all sleep parameters were associated with substance involvement in a dose-response manner. Short sleep duration, sleep deficit, large bedtime differences and insomnia were all significantly associated with higher odds of all alcohol and drug use/misuse measures. The associations were only partly attenuated by sociodemographics factors and co-existing symptoms of depression and ADHD.
To the best of our knowledge, this is the first population-based study to examine the association between sleep, and alcohol and drug use, by employing detailed measures of sleep behaviour and problems, as well as validated measures on consumption of alcohol and illicit drug use. The findings call for increased awareness of the link between sleep problems and alcohol and drugs use/misuse as a major public health issue.
PubMed ID
25707706 View in PubMed
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Use of alcohol, tobacco and illicit drugs among ethnic Norwegian and ethnic minority adolescents in Hordaland county, Norway: the youth@hordaland-survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293536
Source
Ethn Health. 2018 01; 23(1):43-56
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
01-2018
Author
Jens Christoffer Skogen
Tormod Bøe
Børge Sivertsen
Mari Hysing
Author Affiliation
a Alcohol and Drug Research Western Norway , Stavanger University Hospital , Stavanger , Norway.
Source
Ethn Health. 2018 01; 23(1):43-56
Date
01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Alcohol Drinking - ethnology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Europe
Female
Humans
Male
Minority Groups - statistics & numerical data
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Self Report
Smoking - epidemiology
Social Class
Street Drugs
Tobacco
Tobacco, Smokeless - utilization
Abstract
To describe potential differences in unhealthy behaviours among ethnic Norwegian adolescents and minority adolescents from countries within the European Union, European Economic Area or US (EU/EEA countries) and adolescents from non-EU/EEA countries. Specifically, we aimed to investigate ethnic differences in use of alcohol, tobacco and illicit drugs, and potential confounding due to socio-demographic characteristics.
Cross-sectional population-based study of adolescents aged 16-19 (N?=?10,122), with self-reported ethnicity as grouping variable, and self-reported use of alcohol, tobacco and illicit drugs as dependent variables.
We found that minority adolescents from EU/EEA and non-EU/EEA countries differed from ethnic Norwegian adolescents on important indicators of unhealthy behaviours. Compared to Norwegian adolescents, adolescents from EU/EEA were more likely to report having tried to smoke, to be a daily smoker and to ever having tried an illicit drug (adjusted odds ratio (OR) ranging from 2.01 to 3.74). They were, however, less likely to have tried snus (a form of smokeless tobacco; adjusted OR 0.64; confidence interval (CI) 95% 0.43-0.97) and to report daily snus use (adjusted OR 0.31; CI95% 0.15-0.67). There were no differences in having tried alcohol. Non-EU/EEA adolescents were less likely to have ever tried alcohol (OR 0.24; CI95% 0.18-0.31), snus (OR 0.47; CI95% 0.34-0.65) and to smoke (0.68; CI95% 0.52-0.91), and less likely to report daily snus use (OR 0.36; CI95% 0.21-0.62) compared to Norwegian adolescents. There were no differences with regard to having tried illicit drugs and reporting being a daily smoker. All differences observed were robust to adjustment for age, gender and family socio-economic status.
The presents study identified important differences in unhealthy behaviours across different ethnic groups in Norway. The differences in the prevalence of unhealthy behaviours among ethnic minorities are still relevant in a public health perspective, and potential mechanisms should be investigated further.
PubMed ID
27764960 View in PubMed
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The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ): Factor Structure and Gender Equivalence in Norwegian Adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281568
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(5):e0152202
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Tormod Bøe
Mari Hysing
Jens Christoffer Skogen
Kyrre Breivik
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(5):e0152202
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Female
Humans
Male
Norway
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Although frequently used with older adolescents, few studies of the factor structure, internal consistency and gender equivalence of the SDQ exists for this age group, with inconsistent findings. In the present study, confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to evaluate the five-factor structure of the SDQ in a population sample of 10,254 16-18 year-olds from the youth@hordaland study. Measurement invariance across gender was assessed using multigroup CFA. A modestly modified five-factor solution fitted the data acceptably, accounting for one cross loading and some local dependencies. Importantly, partial measurement non-invariance was identified, with differential item functioning in eight items, and higher correlations between emotional and conduct problems for boys compared to girls. Implications for use clinically and in research are discussed.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27138259 View in PubMed
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Concurrent validity of the CAGE questionnaire. The Nord-Tr√łndelag Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101907
Source
Addict Behav. 2011 Apr;36(4):302-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Jens Christoffer Skogen
Simon Overland
Ann Kristin Knudsen
Arnstein Mykletun
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Psychology, University of Bergen, Norway. jens.skogen@uib.no
Source
Addict Behav. 2011 Apr;36(4):302-7
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Alcohol-Related Disorders - diagnosis
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Psychometrics
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the CAGE questionnaire, and the questionnaire's concurrent validity with current and previous alcohol consumption. This study employed data from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Survey wave 1 (HUNT-1 in 1984-86: N=24,900) and wave 2 (HUNT-2 in 1995-97: N=36,350). The concurrent validity of the CAGE questionnaire was examined both as a dichotomous variable with the recommended cut-off (=2 affirmative answers) for alcohol problems, and as a categorical scale. The categorical scale was constructed by counting responses from 0 to 4, and a separate category for current abstainers in HUNT-2. Current self-reported consumption above the gender specific 80th percentile was defined as "current excessive consumption". "Previous excessive consumers" were defined by meeting at least one of the two following criteria at the time of HUNT-1: reporting drinking too much alcohol in any period of their life, or reporting a high level of alcohol consumption. The internal reliability of CAGE was adequate, and in relation to alcohol consumption, there was a linear relationship between the CAGE score and both the current and previous excessive consumption. In conclusion, this study indicates good concurrent validity and adequate psychometric properties of the CAGE questionnaire. The dose-response pattern seen between the CAGE score and alcohol consumption, suggests that it can be used as an ordinal measure, rather than with a cut-off of two or more. The concurrent validity of the CAGE is better in women than in men.
PubMed ID
21167648 View in PubMed
Less detail

Psychometric properties and concurrent validity of the CRAFFT among Norwegian adolescents. Ung@hordaland, a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113033
Source
Addict Behav. 2013 Oct;38(10):2500-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Jens Christoffer Skogen
Tormod Bøe
Ann Kristin Knudsen
Mari Hysing
Author Affiliation
Alcohol and Drug Research Western Norway, Stavanger University Hospital, Norway. jens.skogen@uni.no
Source
Addict Behav. 2013 Oct;38(10):2500-5
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Binge Drinking - epidemiology
Humans
Mass Screening - methods
Norway - epidemiology
Psychometrics
Questionnaires - standards
Reference Standards
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report
Sensitivity and specificity
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of the study was to examine the psychometric properties of the CRAFFT-questionnaire, and its concurrent validity with self-reported measures of alcohol consumption and illicit drug use ever among Norwegian adolescents. This study employs data from the ung@hordaland survey (N=9680). The concurrent validity of the CRAFFT-questionnaire was examined both as a case-finder with different cut-offs, but also as an ordinal scale. The ordinal scale was constructed by counting the number of affirmative responses from 0 to 6. Current self-reported excessive alcohol consumption, frequent binge drinking and any illicit drug use ever were employed as concurrent validity measures. The internal reliability of CRAFFT was adequate, and there was a linear relationship between CRAFFT-score and excessive alcohol consumption, frequent binge drinking and illicit drug use ever for both genders. Overall, this study shows a good concurrent validity and adequate psychometric properties of the CRAFFT-questionnaire. There results indicate, however, that the use of CRAFFT as a case-finder needs further research, as a suitable cut-point was difficult to determine. The authors conclude that in a clinical setting one positive answer is enough to warrant further investigation, and for research purposes the use of the questionnaire as an ordinal scale or using a cut-point of 2 might be preferable.
PubMed ID
23770648 View in PubMed
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Maternal heavy alcohol use and toddler behavior problems: a fixed effects regression analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272617
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2015 Oct;24(10):1269-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Ann Kristin Knudsen
Eivind Ystrom
Jens Christoffer Skogen
Leila Torgersen
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2015 Oct;24(10):1269-77
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - psychology
Child
Child Behavior - psychology
Child Behavior Disorders - etiology - psychology
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Depression - etiology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers - psychology
Norway - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Abstract
Using data from the longitudinal Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, the aims of the current study were to examine associations between postnatal maternal heavy alcohol use and toddler behavior problems, taking both observed and unobserved confounding factors into account by employing fixed effects regression models. Postnatal maternal heavy alcohol use (defined as drinking alcohol 4 or more times a week, or drinking 7 units or more per alcohol use episode) and toddler internalizing and externalizing behavior problems were assessed when the toddlers were aged 18 and 36 months. Maternal psychopathology, civil status and negative life events last year were included as time-variant covariates. Maternal heavy alcohol use was associated with toddler internalizing and externalizing behavior problems (p 
Notes
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PubMed ID
25586409 View in PubMed
Less detail

Confirmatory factor analysis and item response theory analysis of the Whiteley Index. Results from a large population based study in Norway. The Hordaland Health Study (HUSK).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258257
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2014 Sep;77(3):213-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Kari-Elise Frøystad Veddegjærde
Børge Sivertsen
Ingvard Wilhelmsen
Jens Christoffer Skogen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Bergen, Norway; Department of Medicine, Haraldsplass Deaconess Hospital, Bergen, Norway. Electronic address: karielisev@gmail.com.
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2014 Sep;77(3):213-8
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anxiety - diagnosis - epidemiology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Hypochondriasis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Psychometrics
Abstract
The Whiteley Index (WI) is a widely used screening instrument for health anxiety/hypochondriasis. Several studies have previously explored the psychometric properties of the WI, but with mixed findings concerning both item composition and factor structure. The main aim of the current study was to examine different factor structures as identified from previous studies using data from a large general population based study. We also wanted to provide gender specific norms.
Data were taken from a large population-based study in Norway, the Hordaland Health Study (HUSK N=7274). Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) of several models of the WI was conducted. Item response theory (IRT) analysis was performed on the model with the best goodness-of-fit.
CFA of all previously proposed factor models of the WI revealed clearly inadequate model fits. The IRT analysis suggested that a six-item model best described the data, and CFA confirmed an adequate goodness-of-fit across indices.
The current study found evidence for a six-item, single-factor model of the WI. Our findings suggest that this abbreviated version has the best factor structure compared to previously proposed factor models. We recommend that the factor structure identified in this study should be investigated further in independent samples.
PubMed ID
25149031 View in PubMed
Less detail

Somatic symptoms beyond those generally associated with a whiplash injury are increased in self-reported chronic whiplash. A population-based cross sectional study: the Hordaland Health Study (HUSK).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121133
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2012;12:129
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Solbjørg Makalani Myrtveit
Jens Christoffer Skogen
Hanne Gro Wenzel
Arnstein Mykletun
Author Affiliation
Faculty of medicine and dentistry, University of Bergen (UoB), Bergen, Norway
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2012;12:129
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anxiety - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neck Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Self Report
Somatoform Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Whiplash Injuries - complications - epidemiology
Abstract
Chronic whiplash leads to considerable patient suffering and substantial societal costs. There are two competing hypothesis on the etiology of chronic whiplash. The traditional organic hypothesis considers chronic whiplash and related symptoms a result of a specific injury. In opposition is the hypothesis that chronic whiplash is a functional somatic syndrome, and related symptoms a result of society-induced expectations and amplification of symptoms. According to both hypotheses, patients reporting chronic whiplash are expected to have more neck pain, headache and symptoms of anxiety and depression than the general population. Increased prevalence of somatic symptoms beyond those directly related to a whiplash neck injury is less investigated. The aim of this study was to test an implication derived from the functional hypothesis: Is the prevalence of somatic symptoms as seen in somatization disorder, beyond symptoms related to a whiplash neck injury, increased in individuals self-reporting chronic whiplash? We further aimed to explore recall bias by comparing the symptom profile displayed by individuals self-reporting chronic whiplash to that among those self-reporting a non-functional injury: fractures of the hand or wrist. We explored symptom load, etiologic origin could not be investigated in this study.
Data from the Norwegian population-based "Hordaland Health Study" (HUSK, 1997-99); N = 13,986 was employed. Chronic whiplash was self-reported by 403 individuals and fractures by 1,746. Somatization tendency was measured using a list of 17 somatic symptoms arising from different body parts and organ systems, derived from the research criteria for somatization disorder (ICD-10, F45).
Chronic whiplash was associated with an increased level of all 17 somatic symptoms investigated (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
22935146 View in PubMed
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Midlife mental distress and risk for dementia up to 27 years later: the Nord-Tr√łndelag Health Study (HUNT) in linkage with a dementia registry in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272065
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2015;15:23
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Jens Christoffer Skogen
Sverre Bergh
Robert Stewart
Ann Kristin Knudsen
Ottar Bjerkeset
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2015;15:23
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Dementia - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Registries
Risk factors
Self Report
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Time Factors
Abstract
Dementia is an increasing public health challenge, and the number of individuals affected is growing rapidly. Mental disorders and symptoms of mental distress have been reported to be risk factors for dementia. The aim of this study was to examine whether midlife mental distress is a predictor for onset of dementia later in life.
Using data from a large population-based study (The Nord-Trøndelag Health Study; HUNT1) linked to a dementia registry (The Health and Memory study; HMS) enabling a maximum 27 years of follow-up, we ascertained mental distress and subsequent dementia status for 30,902 individuals aged 30-60 years at baseline. In HUNT1, self-reported mental distress was assessed using the four-item Anxiety and Depression Index (ADI-4). Dementia status was ascertained from HMS, which included patient and caregiver history, cognitive testing and clinical and physical examinations from the hospitals and nursing homes serving the catchment area of HUNT1. In the main analysis, unadjusted and adjusted logistic regression models were computed for the prospective association between mental distress and dementia. In secondary analyses, two-way age and gender interactions with mental distress on later dementia were examined.
A 50% increased odds for dementia among HUNT1-participants reporting mental distress was found (crude odds ratio (OR): 1.52; 95% CI 1.15-2.01), and a 35% increase in the fully adjusted model (OR 1.35; 95% CI 1.01-1.80). In secondary analyses, we found evidence for a two-way interaction with age on the association between mental distress and dementia (p?=?0.030): the age- and gender adjusted OR was 2.44 (95% CI 1.18-5.05) in those aged 30-44 years at baseline, and 1.24 (0.91-1.69) in 45-60 year olds.
Our results indicate an association between midlife mental distress and increased risk of later dementia, an association that was stronger for distress measured in early compared to later midlife. Mental distress should be investigated further as a potentially modifiable risk factor for dementia.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25886723 View in PubMed
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Moving into poverty during childhood is associated with later sleep problems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290220
Source
Sleep Med. 2017 Sep; 37:54-59
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
Børge Sivertsen
Tormod Bøe
Jens Christoffer Skogen
Keith J Petrie
Mari Hysing
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Promotion, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Bergen, Norway; The Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health and Child Welfare, Uni Research Health, Bergen, Norway; Department of Research & Innovation, Helse Fonna HF, Haugesund, Norway. Electronic address: borge.sivertsen@fhi.no.
Source
Sleep Med. 2017 Sep; 37:54-59
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Analysis of Variance
Family
Humans
Income
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Norway
Poverty - psychology
Registries
Risk factors
Sleep
Sleep Wake Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Social Mobility
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
A social gradient in sleep has been demonstrated across the life span, but previous studies have been cross-sectional and used self-reported socioeconomic status (SES) indicators. Using registry-based data on family income trajectories, the current study examined the association between relative poverty in childhood and subsequent sleep in adolescence.
Data on family income during 2004-2010 was obtained from the National Income Registry. Poverty was defined as household income
PubMed ID
28899540 View in PubMed
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