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Implementation of the Canadian Clinical Practice Guidelines for Nutrition Support: a multiple case study of barriers and enablers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162343
Source
Nutr Clin Pract. 2007 Aug;22(4):449-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Naomi E Jones
Jeanette Suurdt
Hélène Ouelette-Kuntz
Daren K Heyland
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Queen's University, 76 Stuart Street, Kingston, ON, Canada, K7L 2V7.
Source
Nutr Clin Pract. 2007 Aug;22(4):449-57
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Case-Control Studies
Clinical Competence
Female
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Intensive Care - methods - psychology - standards
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Nutritional Support - methods - standards
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Abstract
The Canadian Nutrition Support Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs), published in 2003, were designed to improve nutrition support practices in intensive care units (ICUs). However, their impact to date has been modest. This study aimed to identify important barriers and enablers to implementation of these guidelines.
Case studies were completed at 4 Canadian ICUs. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 7 key informants at each site. During the interviews, the key informants were asked about their perceptions of the barriers and enablers to implementation of the Canadian Nutrition Support CPGs. Interview transcripts were analyzed qualitatively, using a framework approach.
Resistance to change, lack of awareness, lack of critical care experience, clinical condition of the patient, resource constraints, a slow administrative process, workload, numerous guidelines, complex recommendations, paucity of evidence, and outdated guidelines were cited as the main barriers to guideline implementation. Agreement of the ICU team, easy access to the guidelines, ease of application, incorporation into daily routine, education and training, the dietitian as an opinion leader, and open discussion were identified as the primary enabling factors. Although consistent across all sites, the influence of these factors seemed to differ by site and profession.
Our findings suggest that implementation of the Canadian Nutrition Support CPGs is profoundly complex and is determined by practitioner, patient, institutional, and guideline factors. Further research is required to quantify the impact of each barrier and enabler and the mechanism by which they influence guideline adherence.
PubMed ID
17644700 View in PubMed
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Understanding adherence to guidelines in the intensive care unit: development of a comprehensive framework.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139114
Source
JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2010 Nov-Dec;34(6):616-24
Publication Type
Article
Author
Naomi E Cahill
Jeanette Suurdt
Hélène Ouellette-Kuntz
Daren K Heyland
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
Source
JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2010 Nov-Dec;34(6):616-24
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Critical Care - methods - standards
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Intensive Care Units
Nutrition Therapy - standards
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Abstract
Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have been hailed as a useful method of translating evidence into practice. Several CPGs have been published that provide recommendations for feeding patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). Despite a rigorous development process and active dissemination of these guidelines, their impact on nutrition practice has been modest. The purpose of this study was to develop a comprehensive framework for understanding adherence to nutrition CPGs in the critical care setting.
Multiple case studies were completed at 4 Canadian ICUs. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 7 key informants at each ICU site who were asked about their perceptions and attitudes toward guidelines in general and the Canadian Critical Care Nutrition CPGs specifically. Interview transcripts and related documents were analyzed qualitatively using a framework approach.
The 5 key components of the developed framework were characteristics of the CPGs, the implementation process, institutional factors, provider intent, and the clinical condition of the patient. These key themes encapsulate numerous itemized factors that contribute to guideline adherence either as barriers or enablers.
Adherence to nutrition CPGs is determined by a complex interaction of multiple factors that act as barriers or enablers. The comprehensive framework for adherence to CPGs in the ICU attempts to elucidate this process and provides a useful template for future research. Future quality improvement initiatives should assess local barriers to change and design interventions to overcome these barriers.
Notes
Comment In: JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2010 Nov-Dec;34(6):593-421097753
PubMed ID
21097762 View in PubMed
Less detail