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Do healthy food baskets assess food security?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183764
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2003 Spring-Summer;24(2-3):65-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Tasnim Nathoo
Jean Shoveller
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, James Mather Building, 5804 Fairview Avenue, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z3. tasmin@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2003 Spring-Summer;24(2-3):65-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Costs and Cost Analysis
Ecology - methods
Food Habits
Food Supply - economics - standards
Humans
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Surveys
Population Surveillance - methods
Residence Characteristics
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Developing indicators to measure the different facets of food security presents numerous conceptual and methodological challenges. This paper adopts an ecological framework to reflect on these issues through an examination of the Healthy Food Basket (HFB) tool. The HFB tool is used to measure food security conditions by determining the cost and availability of a group of foods in a shopping basket across a range of stores in different regions and neighbourhoods. The paper discusses the ability of the HFB tool to describe micro-, meso- and macro-level influences on food security and the use of the ecological model in developing complementary and alternative strategies for understanding and monitoring food security.
PubMed ID
12959676 View in PubMed
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(Ir)reconcilable differences? Local reactions to provincial neoliberal educational reform.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29481
Source
Promot Educ. 2005;Suppl 3:35-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Jean Shoveller
Danielle Elliott
Joy Johnson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. jean.shoveller@ubc.ca
Source
Promot Educ. 2005;Suppl 3:35-8
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural
British Columbia
Child
Child Welfare
Education - trends
Humans
Needs Assessment
Organizational Case Studies
Policy Making
Politics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rural Population
Workload
Abstract
In this case study, we explore the intersections of neoliberal educational reform and the everyday experiences of people living in a rural region in northern British Columbia, Canada. Reflecting on the provincial Ministry of Education's Strategic Plan, we explore one region's responses to a set of provincial promises, which include providing regional school districts with more autonomy and control over the delivery of education services and a mandate for a balanced budget. The region faced declining student enrolments and funding shortfalls. As a cost-saving measure, the local school district in the region launched a four-day school week. We used ethnographic fieldwork techniques to examine a set of local practices and consequences that arose following the implementation of this measure. The findings demonstrate how provincial promises of educational reform can conflict with local educational needs and create a set of problematic everyday realities with repercussions on youth health, amplifying health inequalities that are irreconcilable with the purported goals of advancing the interests of students and society.
PubMed ID
16161848 View in PubMed
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"Around here, they roll up the sidewalks at night": a qualitative study of youth living in a rural Canadian community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164587
Source
Health Place. 2007 Dec;13(4):826-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Jean Shoveller
Joy Johnson
Ken Prkachin
David Patrick
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, University of British Columbia, 5804 Fairview Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z3. jean.shoveller@ubc.ca
Source
Health Place. 2007 Dec;13(4):826-38
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adult
Anthropology, Cultural
British Columbia
Child
Child Behavior - psychology
Christianity
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Prejudice
Qualitative Research
Residence Characteristics
Rural Population
Sexual Behavior - psychology
Social Environment
Abstract
The paper is based on an ethnographic study conducted in a rural community in British Columbia, Canada. The study examined the impact of community culture on youth's development as sexual beings. We describe how social and geographical forces intersect to affect youth's lives and trace the ways in which deprivation of various forms of capital as well as social practices contribute to some youth being located in undesirable social positions. Our findings illustrate how the effects of stigmatisation, self-segregation, and other forms of symbolic violence can extend beyond health impacts and into the broader social realm.
PubMed ID
17368073 View in PubMed
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Safety and danger in downtown Vancouver: understandings of place among young people entrenched in an urban drug scene.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148692
Source
Health Place. 2010 Jan;16(1):51-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Danya Fast
Jean Shoveller
Kate Shannon
Thomas Kerr
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, Urban Health Research Initiative, 608-1081 Burrard Street, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6Z 1Y6. dfast@cfenet.ubc.ca
Source
Health Place. 2010 Jan;16(1):51-60
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
British Columbia
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Safety
Substance-Related Disorders
Symbolism
Urban Population
Violence
Young Adult
Abstract
We undertook this qualitative study to examine young people's understandings of the physical and social landscape of the downtown drug scene in Vancouver, Canada. In-depth interviews were conducted with 38 young people ranging from 16 to 26 years of age. Using the concept of symbolic violence, we describe how one downtown neighborhood in particular powerfully symbolizes 'risk' among local youth, and how the idea of this neighborhood (and what happens when young people go there) informs experiences of marginalization in society's hierarchies. We also discuss the complex role played by social networks in transcending the geographical and conceptual boundaries between distinct downtown drug-using neighborhoods. Finally, we emphasize that young people's spatial tactics within this downtown landscape - the everyday movements they employ in order to maximize their safety - must be understood in the context of everyday violence and profound social suffering.
Notes
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Cites: Int J Drug Policy. 2008 Dec;19(6):459-6618378132
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2009;9:719134203
PubMed ID
19733496 View in PubMed
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Barriers to STI testing among youth in a Canadian oil and gas community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159499
Source
Health Place. 2008 Dec;14(4):718-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Shira Goldenberg
Jean Shoveller
Mieke Koehoorn
Aleck Ostry
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. shiragol@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Health Place. 2008 Dec;14(4):718-29
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
British Columbia
Female
Fossil Fuels
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Industry
Male
Mass Screening - utilization
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - diagnosis
Abstract
Northeastern British Columbia, Canada, is undergoing in-migration of young people attracted by jobs in the oil/gas sectors. Chlamydia rates among youth ages 15-24 are increasing and exceed the provincial average by 22%. Testing for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) reduces the disease burden, contributing to prevention. We conducted ethnographic fieldwork, including interviews with 25 youth and 14 service providers, to document their perceptions regarding youth's access to STI testing. Five key barriers to access were identified: limited opportunities for access, geographic inaccessibility, local social norms, limited information, and negative interactions with providers. To address youths' needs, we recommend active STI prevention and testing service delivery models that incorporate a locally tailored public awareness campaign, outreach to oil/gas workers, condom distribution, expanded clinic hours and drop-in STI testing, specialized training for health care providers, and inter-sectoral partnerships between public health, non-profit organizations, and industry.
PubMed ID
18171632 View in PubMed
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Identifying barriers to emergency contraception use among young women from various sociocultural groups in British Columbia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164681
Source
Perspect Sex Reprod Health. 2007 Mar;39(1):13-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Jean Shoveller
Cathy Chabot
Judith A Soon
Marc Levine
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. jshovell@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Perspect Sex Reprod Health. 2007 Mar;39(1):13-20
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
British Columbia
Contraception Behavior - ethnology - psychology
Contraceptives, Postcoital - therapeutic use
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Nursing Methodology Research
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology - psychology
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Research Design - standards
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Despite advances related to the provision of emergency contraception in Canada, particularly the granting of independent prescriptive authority to pharmacists in 2000, little is known about the ways in which women perceive potential barriers to using it.
In 2004, an ethnically diverse sample of 52 women living in Greater Vancouver participated in interviews that were analyzed for an assessment of women's knowledge, attitudes and experiences related to emergency contraception, with particular attention to the ways in which ethnicity affected their stories.
Participants generally misperceived emergency contraception as an abortifacient, and often mistakenly thought that it has long-term effects on health and fertility. Knowledge gaps regarding reproductive physiology impeded clear understanding of when it is most effective. Participants also reported receiving subtle and sometimes overtly stigmatizing messages from providers when they sought emergency contraception. Asian and South Asian women were particularly concerned about negative interactions with providers; for example, they feared that female providers from their sociocultural community might recognize, chastise or gossip about them. Institutional policies (e.g., a Catholic hospital's refusal to provide the method), coupled with low awareness of pharmacists' prescriptive authority, also created barriers to use.
Women's ability to benefit from emergency contraception is hampered by lack of knowledge and conservative cultural or social mores. Serious contextual and structural shifts are required before woman-centered approaches to provision of the method become the norm.
PubMed ID
17355377 View in PubMed
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Potential barriers to engineered noise control in food and beverage manufacturing in British Columbia, Canada: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127799
Source
Int J Audiol. 2012 Feb;51 Suppl 1:S43-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Hugh W Davies
Amber Louie
Musarrat Nahid
Jean Shoveller
Author Affiliation
School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. hugh.davies@ubc.ca
Source
Int J Audiol. 2012 Feb;51 Suppl 1:S43-50
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia
Environment
Female
Food-Processing Industry
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced - prevention & control
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Noise, Occupational - prevention & control
Organizational Culture
Young Adult
Abstract
Noise is probably the most ubiquitous of occupational hazards. While many jurisdictions require hearing conservation programs (HCP), the most effective intervention-engineered noise controls (ENC)-is rarely implemented. We used a qualitative study design to investigate barriers to the implementation of ENC. DESIGN & STUDY SAMPLE: Fifty-five individuals at eight food and beverage manufacturers participated. In-depth interviews were conducted and analysed using grounded theory techniques. HCP audits provided contextual information.
None of the companies had fully implemented HCP as required by regulation. Many factors emerged as possible barriers to the implementation of engineered noise control, including: poor knowledge of relevant regulations, noise reduction options and the health impacts of noise; weak technical skills and experience; low ranking of noise as a hazard by stakeholders; issues around job insecurity, weak language skills; lack of 'quiet' machine options and information from equipment manufacturers; poor employer-regulator relationships; barriers to employee-employer reporting; informal valuation of ENC costs; and feasibility issues.
Potential barriers to the implementation of ENC were identified, and classified at three levels at which they operated. Many barriers could be addressed by a more rigorous application of existing HCP regulation and improvements in education, technical support, and regulatory enforcement.
PubMed ID
22264062 View in PubMed
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STI service delivery in British Columbia, Canada; providers' views of their services to youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121939
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2012;12:240
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Cindy L Masaro
Joy Johnson
Cathy Chabot
Jean Shoveller
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia (UBC) Faculty of Applied Science/Nursing, 302 - 6190 Agronomy Road, Vancouver V6T 1Z3, Canada. cindy.masaro@gmail.com
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2012;12:240
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - standards - supply & distribution
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
British Columbia
Clinical Competence - standards
Community Health Workers - education - psychology
Confidentiality
Delivery of Health Care - methods - standards
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Personnel - education - psychology
Healthcare Disparities - ethnology - standards
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Qualitative Research
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - prevention & control - therapy
Social Stigma
Specialization - standards
Abstract
Little is known about service providers' knowledge, attitudes, and experiences in relation to the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of individuals seeking care for sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and how they influence the delivery of services. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of STI care providers and the ways they approached their practice.
We used a qualitative approach drawing on methods used in thematic analysis. Individual semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 21 service providers delivering STI services in youth clinics, STI clinics, reproductive health clinics, and community public health units in British Columbia (BC), Canada.
Service providers' descriptions of their activities and roles were shaped by a number of themes including specialization, scarcity, and maintaining the status quo. The analysis suggests that service providers perceive, at times, the delivery of STI care to be inefficient and inadequate.
Findings from this study identify deficits in the delivery of STI services in BC. To understand these deficits, more research is needed to examine the larger health care structure within which service providers work, and how this structure not only informs and influences the delivery of services, but also how particular structural barriers impinge on and/or restrict practice.
Notes
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 2005 Jan;49(2):191-20915641952
Cites: CMAJ. 1999 Jun 29;160(13):1830-410405667
Cites: AIDS Care. 2006 Jan;18(1):22-616282072
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Cites: Health Place. 2008 Dec;14(4):718-2918171632
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Cites: AIDS Patient Care STDS. 2005 Jan;19(1):40-815665634
PubMed ID
22863400 View in PubMed
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Online sexual health services: examining youth's perspectives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126949
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 Jan-Feb;103(1):14-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jean Shoveller
Rod Knight
Wendy Davis
Mark Gilbert
Gina Ogilvie
Author Affiliation
School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC. jean.shoveller@ubc.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 Jan-Feb;103(1):14-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services
Attitude to Health
British Columbia
Counseling - methods
Female
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Internet
Male
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Risk assessment
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - prevention & control
Social Media
Young Adult
Abstract
Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are high and rising in British Columbia, Canada, and youth ages 15-24 account for a disproportionate amount of the infections. As a result, new public health interventions have increasingly turned towards media such as the internet to reach youth populations at risk for STIs/HIV. We describe youth's perceptions about online sexual health services.
We used data from in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 38 men and 14 women between the ages of 15 and 24 who discussed: online STI/HIV testing services and online counselling and education services.
In general, youth are familiar with, receptive to and have an affinity for online sexual health services. Youth in the current study suggested that online STI/HIV risk assessment and testing as well as online counselling and education could enhance opportunities for low-threshold service provision. Online services appealed to youth's needs for convenience, privacy, as well as expedient access to testing and/or counselling; however, youth also appear to have relatively low tolerance for technologies that they perceive to be antiquated (e.g., printing lab requisition forms), revealing the challenges of designing online approaches that will not quickly become outdated.
Globally, pilot programs for Internet-based sexual health services such as online testing and partner notification have shown promising results. As Canadian interventions of this type emerge, research with youth populations can provide relevant insights to help program planners launch effective interventions.
PubMed ID
22338322 View in PubMed
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Injection drug users' access to a supervised injection facility in Vancouver, Canada: the influence of operating policies and local drug culture.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136441
Source
Qual Health Res. 2011 Jun;21(6):743-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Will Small
Jean Shoveller
David Moore
Mark Tyndall
Evan Wood
Thomas Kerr
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2011 Jun;21(6):743-56
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural
British Columbia
Community Health Centers - utilization
Female
HIV Infections - prevention & control
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Organizational Policy
Risk-Taking
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
Substance Abuse, Intravenous
Abstract
North America's first supervised injection facility (SIF) was established in Vancouver, Canada, in 2003. Although evaluation research has documented reductions in risk behavior among SIF users, there has been limited examination of the influence of operational features on injection drug users' access to these facilities. We conducted an ethnographic study that included observational research within the SIF, 50 in-depth individual interviews with SIF users, and analysis of the regulatory frameworks governing the SIF. The government-granted exemption allowing the facility to operate legally imposes key operating regulations, as well as a cap on capacity, which results in significant wait times to enter the injecting room. Regulations that prohibit practices that are common in the local drug culture also negatively affect SIF utilization. Restructuring policies that shape the operation of the SIF could enhance access to the facility and permit SIF services to better accommodate local drug use practices.
PubMed ID
21378259 View in PubMed
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20 records – page 1 of 2.