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Medical education for a healthier population: reflections on the Flexner Report from a public health perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145785
Source
Acad Med. 2010 Feb;85(2):211-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Rika Maeshiro
Ian Johnson
Denise Koo
Jean Parboosingh
Jan K Carney
Neil Gesundheit
Evelyn T Ho
David Butler-Jones
Denise Donovan
Jonathan A Finkelstein
Nancy M Bennett
Barbie Shore
Stephen A McCurdy
Lloyd F Novick
Lily Dow Velarde
M Marie Dent
Ann Banchoff
Laurence Cohen
Author Affiliation
Association of American Medical Colleges, Washington, DC 20037, USA. rmaeshiro@aamc.org
Source
Acad Med. 2010 Feb;85(2):211-9
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cause of Death - trends
Education, Medical - trends
Health Care Reform
Humans
Public Health - education - trends
United States
Abstract
Abraham Flexner's 1910 report is credited with promoting critical reforms in medical education. Because Flexner advocated scientific rigor and standardization in medical education, his report has been perceived to place little emphasis on the importance of public health in clinical education and training. However, a review of the report reveals that Flexner presciently identified at least three public-health-oriented principles that contributed to his arguments for medical education reform: (1) The training, quality, and quantity of physicians should meet the health needs of the public, (2) physicians have societal obligations to prevent disease and promote health, and medical training should include the breadth of knowledge necessary to meet these obligations, and (3) collaborations between the academic medicine and public health communities result in benefits to both parties. In this article, commemorating the Flexner Centenary, the authors review the progress of U.S. and Canadian medical schools in addressing these principles in the context of contemporary societal health needs, provide an update on recent efforts to address what has long been perceived as a deficit in medical education (inadequate grounding of medical students in public health), and provide new recommendations on how to create important linkages between medical education and public health. Contemporary health challenges that require a public health approach in addition to one-on-one clinical skills include containing epidemics of preventable chronic diseases, reforming the health care system to provide equitable high-quality care to populations, and responding to potential disasters in an increasingly interconnected world. The quantitative skills and contextual knowledge that will prepare physicians to address these and other population health problems constitute the basics of public health and should be included throughout the continuum of medical education.
PubMed ID
20107345 View in PubMed
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Medical schools' social contract: more than just education and research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186064
Source
CMAJ. 2003 Apr 1;168(7):852-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2003
Author
Jean Parboosingh
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB.
Source
CMAJ. 2003 Apr 1;168(7):852-3
Date
Apr-1-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Community-Institutional Relations
Humans
Physician's Role
Research
Schools, Medical - ethics
Social Responsibility
PubMed ID
12668544 View in PubMed
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Steps to improve the teaching of public health to undergraduate medical students in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158105
Source
Acad Med. 2008 Apr;83(4):414-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Ian Johnson
Denise Donovan
Jean Parboosingh
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. ian.johnson@utoronto.ca
Source
Acad Med. 2008 Apr;83(4):414-8
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Curriculum - standards
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - standards
Educational Status
Faculty, Medical - standards
Health promotion
Humans
Preventive Medicine - education
Program Development
Public Health - education
Students, Medical
Teaching - standards
Total Quality Management
Abstract
In Canada, recent events and global influences have led to an emphasis on enhancing the public health system and improving the training of physicians in public and population health. Responding to the World Health Organization's initiative, Towards Unity for Health, the Association of Faculties of Medicine in Canada launched its Social Accountability initiative in 2001, which included the creation of the Public Health Task Group. With representation from the Public Health Agency of Canada, Canadian faculties of medicine, medical students, the Medical Council of Canada, and the community, the task group undertook four main steps: reaching agreement on common overall objectives for teaching public health, obtaining baseline information on the curricula of programs that were being provided across Canada, obtaining an inventory of resources available at each university, and creating a support system for fostering the development of public health teaching in undergraduate medicine programs. To date, the seventeen medical schools have nearly reached full consensus on the overall educational objectives. An initial scan of existing educational resources revealed no consistent use of any one text. Subsequent work has begun to create an inventory of sharable resources. A network of public health educators has been created and is seen as a promising start to addressing these other concerns. Other barriers remain to be addressed; these include lack of faculty (critical mass), inadequate support for local champions, inadequate methods of student assessment, and poor image as an attractive specialty/few role models.
PubMed ID
18367905 View in PubMed
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