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The 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine for invasive pneumococcal disease in Alaska native children: results of a clinical trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120452
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2013 Mar;32(3):257-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013

Effect of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine on nasopharyngeal colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae--Alaska, 2008-2012.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105983
Source
J Infect Dis. 2014 Apr 15;209(8):1251-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2014
Author
Prabhu P Gounder
Michael G Bruce
Dana J T Bruden
Rosalyn J Singleton
Karen Rudolph
Debby A Hurlburt
Thomas W Hennessy
Jay Wenger
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Division of Preparedness and Emerging Infections, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Disease, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
Source
J Infect Dis. 2014 Apr 15;209(8):1251-8
Date
Apr-15-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Male
Nasopharyngeal Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Nasopharynx - microbiology
Pneumococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Pneumococcal Vaccines - administration & dosage
Prevalence
Rural Population
Streptococcus pneumoniae - isolation & purification
Urban Population
Vaccination
Abstract
In 2010, a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) replaced a 7-valent vaccine (PCV7) that contained all PCV7 serotypes plus 6 additional serotypes (PCV6+). We conducted annual surveys from 2008 to 2012 to determine the effect of PCV13 on colonization by pneumococcal serotypes.
We obtained nasopharyngeal swabs for pneumococcal identification and serotyping from residents of all ages at 8 rural villages and children age
PubMed ID
24273178 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology of pneumococcal serotype 6A and 6C among invasive and carriage isolates from Alaska, 1986-2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117652
Source
Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 2013 Mar;75(3):271-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Karen Rudolph
Michael Bruce
Dana Bruden
Tammy Zulz
Jay Wenger
Alisa Reasonover
Marcella Harker-Jones
Debby Hurlburt
Thomas Hennessy
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA.
Source
Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 2013 Mar;75(3):271-6
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Carrier State - microbiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Genetic Variation
Genotype
Humans
Incidence
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Multilocus Sequence Typing
Penicillins - pharmacology
Pneumococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Pneumococcal Vaccines - administration & dosage
Rural Population
Streptococcus pneumoniae - classification - drug effects - genetics - isolation & purification
Abstract
We investigated serotype 6A/6C invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) incidence, genetic diversity, and carriage before and after 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) introduction in Alaska. IPD cases (1986-2009) were identified through population-based laboratory surveillance. Isolates were initially serotyped by conventional methods, and 6C isolates were differentiated from 6A by polymerase chain reaction. Among invasive and carriage isolates initially typed as 6A, 35% and 50% were identified as 6C, respectively. IPD rates caused by serotype 6A or 6C among children
PubMed ID
23276772 View in PubMed
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Haemophilus disease in Alaskan and Canadian children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98198
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2010 Feb;29(2):186; author reply 186-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010

Serotyping of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from nasopharyngeal samples: use of an algorithm combining microbiologic, serologic, and sequential multiplex PCR techniques.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132808
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2011 Sep;49(9):3209-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Karen Miernyk
Carolynn Debyle
Marcella Harker-Jones
Kimberlee Boyd Hummel
Thomas Hennessy
Jay Wenger
Karen Rudolph
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4055 Tudor Centre Dr., Anchorage, AK 99517, USA. kmiernyk@cdc.gov
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2011 Sep;49(9):3209-14
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Algorithms
Carrier State - microbiology
Child, Preschool
Diagnostic Errors - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Latex Fixation Tests
Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Nasopharynx - microbiology
Pneumococcal Infections - microbiology
Serotyping - methods
Streptococcus pneumoniae - classification - genetics - immunology - isolation & purification
Abstract
We evaluated nasopharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococci) in nine Alaskan communities and used an algorithm combining microbiologic, serologic, and sequential multiplex PCR (MP-PCR) techniques to serotype the isolates. After microbiological identification as pneumococci, isolates (n = 1,135) were serotyped using latex agglutination and Quellung tests (LA/Q) as well as a series of six sequential MP-PCR assays. Results from the two methods agreed for 94% (1,064/1,135) of samples. Eighty-six percent (61/71) of the discordant results were resolved. Discordant results occurred because (i) the MP-PCR gel was misread (31/61 [51%]), (ii) the LA/Q agglutination was misinterpreted (13/61 [21%]), (iii) two serotypes or sets of serotypes were identified by MP-PCR and only one of the two was identified by LA/Q (9/61 [15%]), (iv) different serotypes or sets of serotypes were identified by LA/Q and MP-PCR and both were correct (7/61 [11%]), and (v) the capsular polysaccharide locus (cps) did not amplify during the initial MP-PCR but was present upon retesting (1/61 [2%]). Overall, isolation of pneumococci followed by MP-PCR quickly and accurately identified pneumococcal serotypes in >97% of samples and made available isolates for additional tests such as antimicrobial susceptibility. Misinterpretation of the MP-PCR gel was identified as the main source of discordance. Increasing the number of MP-PCRs from six to seven and reducing the number of serotypes in each reaction may reduce this error. This method may be of use to laboratories characterizing large numbers of S. pneumoniae samples, especially when antimicrobial susceptibility data are needed.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21775540 View in PubMed
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Streptococcus pneumoniae non-susceptibility and outpatient antimicrobial prescribing rates at the Alaska Native Medical Center.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105535
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:22297
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Ryan W Stevens
Jay Wenger
Lisa Bulkow
Michael G Bruce
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Medical Center, Anchorage, AK, USA.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:22297
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska - epidemiology
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial
Drug Utilization Review - statistics & numerical data
Health Services, Indigenous - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Pneumococcal Infections - drug therapy - ethnology
Pneumococcal Vaccines - administration & dosage - adverse effects - immunology
Streptococcus pneumoniae - drug effects - isolation & purification
Abstract
American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) people suffer substantially higher rates of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) than the general US population. We evaluated antimicrobial prescribing data and their association with non-susceptibility in Streptococcus pneumoniae causing IPD in AI/AN people between 1992 and 2009.
Antimicrobial use data were gathered from the electronic patient management system and included all prescriptions dispensed to Alaska Native patients aged 5 years and older from outpatient pharmacies at the Alaska Native Medical Center (ANMC). Antimicrobial susceptibility data were gathered from pneumococcal isolates causing IPD among Anchorage Service Unit AI/AN residents aged 5 years and older. Data were restricted to serotypes not contained in the pneumococcal vaccine (PCV7).
Over the study period, overall antimicrobial prescribing increased 59% (285/1,000 persons/year in 1992 to 454/1,000 persons per year in 2009, p
Notes
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PubMed ID
24358456 View in PubMed
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TRENDS IN HOSPITALIZATION FOR EMPYEMA IN ALASKA NATIVE CHILDREN YOUNGER THAN 10 YEARS OF AGE.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99839
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2010 Dec 15;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2010
Author
Rosalyn J Singleton
Robert C Holman
Jay Wenger
Krista Yorita Christensen
Lisa R Bulkow
Tammy Zulz
Claudia A Steiner
James E Cheek
Author Affiliation
From the *Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Anchorage, AK; †Arctic Investigations Program, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Disease (NCEZID), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), US Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS), Anchorage, AK; ‡Division of High-Consequence Pathogens and Pathology, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Disease (NCEZID), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), US Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS), Atlanta, GA; §Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD; and ¶Division of Epidemiology and Prevention, Office of Public Health Support, Indian Health Service, US Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS), Albuquerque, NM.
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2010 Dec 15;
Date
Dec-15-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
We analyzed hospitalizations for empyema among Alaska Native (AN) children and the general population of US children
PubMed ID
21164385 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.