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2009 Pandemic influenza A H1N1 in Alaska: temporal and geographic characteristics of spread and increased risk of hospitalization among Alaska Native and Asian/Pacific Islander people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136553
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Jan 1;52 Suppl 1:S189-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2011
Author
Jay D Wenger
Louisa J Castrodale
Dana L Bruden
James W Keck
Tammy Zulz
Michael G Bruce
Donna A Fearey
Joe McLaughlin
Debby Hurlburt
Kim Boyd Hummel
Sassa Kitka
Steve Bentley
Timothy K Thomas
Rosalyn Singleton
John T Redd
Larry Layne
James E Cheek
Thomas W Hennessy
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, Alaska 99508, USA. jdw2@cdc.gov
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Jan 1;52 Suppl 1:S189-97
Date
Jan-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska - epidemiology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Child
Child, Preschool
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Geography
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - virology
Male
Middle Aged
Pandemics
Population Groups
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Alaska Native people have suffered disproportionately from previous influenza pandemics. We evaluated 3 separate syndromic data sources to determine temporal and geographic patterns of spread of 2009 pandemic influenza A H1N1 (pH1N1) in Alaska, and reviewed records from persons hospitalized with pH1N1 disease in 3 areas in Alaska to characterize clinical and epidemiologic features of disease in Alaskans. A wave of pH1N1 disease swept through Alaska beginning in most areas in August or early September. In rural regions, where Alaska Native people comprise a substantial proportion of the population, disease occurred earlier than in other regions. Alaska Native people and Asian/Pacific Islanders (A/PI) were 2-4 times more likely to be hospitalized than whites. Alaska Native people and other minorities remain at high risk for early and substantial morbidity from pandemic influenza episodes. These findings should be integrated into plans for distribution and use of vaccine and antiviral agents.
PubMed ID
21342894 View in PubMed
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Haemophilus influenzae serotype a invasive disease, Alaska, USA, 1983-2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113357
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2013 Jun;19(6):932-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Michael G Bruce
Tammy Zulz
Carolynn DeByle
Ros Singleton
Debby Hurlburt
Dana Bruden
Karen Rudolph
Thomas Hennessy
Joseph Klejka
Jay D Wenger
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, Alaska 99507, USA. zwa8@cdc.gov
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2013 Jun;19(6):932-7
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks
Geography
Haemophilus Infections - epidemiology - history
Haemophilus influenzae - classification - genetics
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Middle Aged
Multilocus Sequence Typing
Public Health Surveillance
Serotyping
Young Adult
Abstract
Before introduction of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccines, rates of Hib disease in Alaska's indigenous people were among the highest in the world. Vaccination reduced rates dramatically; however, invasive H. influenzae type a (Hia) disease has emerged. Cases of invasive disease were identified through Alaska statewide surveillance during 1983-2011. Of 866 isolates analyzed for serotype, 32 (4%) were Hia. No Hia disease was identified before 2002; 32 cases occurred during 2002-2011 (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
23735653 View in PubMed
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Migration of persons between households in rural Alaska: considerations for study design.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107656
Source
Pages 851-856 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):851-856
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Dana Bruden
Michael G Bruce
Jay D Wenger
Debby A Hurlburt
Lisa R Bulkow
Thomas W Hennessy
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Division of Preparedness and Emerging Infection, National Center for Emerging and Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, AK, USA. dbruden@cdc.gov
Source
Pages 851-856 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):851-856
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology
Carrier State - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Epidemiologic Methods
Family Characteristics
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Pneumococcal Infections - epidemiology
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Transients and Migrants - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Recent epidemiologic research studies in rural Alaska have examined risk factors for infectious diseases collected at the household level. Examples include the health effects of in-home piped water and household air quality. Because the exposure is measured at the household level, it is necessary to determine if participants remained in the same house throughout the course of follow-up.
We used data from a pneumococcal nasopharyngeal carriage study in 8 rural Alaska villages [3 regions; average number of persons: 642 (min 210, max 720 per village) to quantify changes in household membership and individual movements from 2008 to 2010. We define a household as a group of individuals living in a home together. Because the same households participated in carriage surveys over several years, we could determine changes on an annual basis. We calculated the percentage of households with a = 1 person change in household members from year to year. Additionally, we present the percentage of individuals that changed households during consecutive years.
In 3 regions of Alaska, the average household size was 5 persons. Between 2008 and 2009, 50% (250/497) of households had a change in their membership (= 1 person in-migrated or out-migrated). Fifty-three percent of households experienced some migration of their members between 2009 and 2010. A total of 27 and 15% of households had a change of = 2 and = 3 persons, respectively. The percentage of households with movement was similar among the 3 rural regions and varied from 42 to 63% between villages. At the individual level, an average of 11% of persons changed households between years. The group with the most movement between houses was persons 18-29 years of age (19%), and least movement was in 5-10 and 50-64 years of age (6%). There was no difference in movement by gender.
In rural Alaska, 52% of households experienced movement of members between years and 11% of individuals change households. These are important demographic figures to consider when planning and designing studies that measure an epidemiological exposure at the household level. Power and sample size calculations should account for the loss to follow-up associated with in- and out-migration of individuals from households.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23986903 View in PubMed
Documents
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Molecular characterization of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 12F isolates associated with rural community outbreaks in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116331
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2013 May;51(5):1402-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Tammy Zulz
Jay D Wenger
Karen Rudolph
D Ashley Robinson
Alexey V Rakov
Dana Bruden
Rosalyn J Singleton
Michael G Bruce
Thomas W Hennessy
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, DPEI, NCEZID, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, Alaska, USA. tsc3@cdc.gov
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2013 May;51(5):1402-7
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Disease Outbreaks
Humans
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Multilocus Sequence Typing
Pneumococcal Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology
Rural Population
Serotyping
Streptococcus pneumoniae - classification - genetics
Abstract
Outbreaks of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 12F were observed in two neighboring regions of rural Alaska in 2003 to 2006 and 2006 to 2008. IPD surveillance data from 1986 to 2009 and carriage survey data from 1998 to 2004 and 2008 to 2009 were reviewed to identify patterns of serotype 12F transmission. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was performed on all available isolates, and selected isolates were characterized by additional genetic subtyping methods. Serotype 12F IPD occurred in two waves in Alaska between 1986 and 2008. While cases of disease occurred nearly every year in Anchorage, in rural regions, 12F IPD occurred with rates 10- to 20-fold higher than those in Anchorage, often with many years between disease peaks and generally caused by a single predominant genetic clone. Carriage occurred predominantly in adults, except early in the rural outbreaks, when most carriage was in persons
Notes
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PubMed ID
23408692 View in PubMed
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PCV7-induced changes in pneumococcal carriage and invasive disease burden in Alaskan children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263812
Source
Vaccine. 2014 Nov 12;32(48):6478-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-12-2014
Author
James W Keck
Jay D Wenger
Dana L Bruden
Karen M Rudolph
Debby A Hurlburt
Thomas W Hennessy
Michael G Bruce
Source
Vaccine. 2014 Nov 12;32(48):6478-84
Date
Nov-12-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Carrier State - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Cost of Illness
Epidemiological Monitoring
Humans
Incidence
Pneumococcal Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Pneumococcal Vaccines - administration & dosage
Serogroup
Time Factors
Vaccines, Conjugate - administration & dosage
Abstract
Changes in pneumococcal serotype-specific carriage and invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) after the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) could inform serotype epidemiology patterns following the introduction of newer conjugate vaccines.
We used data from statewide IPD surveillance and annual pneumococcal carriage studies in four regions of Alaska to calculate serotype-specific invasiveness ratios (IR; odds ratio of a carried serotype's likelihood to cause invasive disease compared to other serotypes) in children 1) caused 66% of IPD in both periods, although fewer serotypes with IR>1 remained in the post-vaccine (n=9) than the pre-vaccine period (n=13).
After PCV7 introduction, serotype IRs changed little, and four of the most invasive serotypes were nearly eliminated. If PCV13 use leads to a reduction of carriage and IPD for the 13 vaccine serotypes, the overall IPD rate should further decline.
The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
PubMed ID
25269095 View in PubMed
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Trends in lower respiratory tract infection hospitalizations among American Indian/Alaska Native children and the general US child population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125943
Source
J Pediatr. 2012 Aug;161(2):296-302.e2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Rosalyn J Singleton
Robert C Holman
Arianne M Folkema
Jay D Wenger
Claudia A Steiner
John T Redd
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA. ris2@cdc.gov
Source
J Pediatr. 2012 Aug;161(2):296-302.e2
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Bronchiolitis - epidemiology - ethnology - therapy
Child, Preschool
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Infant
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Pneumonia - epidemiology - ethnology - therapy
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - ethnology - therapy
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
To describe trends in the rate of hospitalization for lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) among American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) children and the general US population of children aged
PubMed ID
22437150 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.