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Advanced glycation end products, soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products, and risk of colorectal cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134920
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2011 Jul;20(7):1430-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Li Jiao
Philip R Taylor
Stephanie J Weinstein
Barry I Graubard
Jarmo Virtamo
Demetrius Albanes
Rachael Z Stolzenberg-Solomon
Author Affiliation
Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. jiao@bcm.edu
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2011 Jul;20(7):1430-8
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Blood glucose
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Finland
Glycosylation End Products, Advanced - blood
Humans
Insulin - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Receptors, Immunologic - blood
Risk factors
Smoking
Tumor Markers, Biological - analysis - blood
Abstract
Advanced glycation end products (AGE) accumulate in human tissue proteins during aging, particularly under hyperglycemia conditions. AGEs induce oxidative stress and inflammation via the receptor for AGEs (RAGE) and soluble RAGE (sRAGE) can neutralize the effects mediated by RAGE-ligand engagement.
We examined the association between N(e)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML), a prominent AGE, and sRAGE and colorectal cancer risk in a prospective case-cohort study nested within a cancer prevention trial among 29,133 Finnish male smokers. Among study subjects who were alive without cancer 5 years after baseline (1985-1988), we identified 483 incident colorectal cancer cases and randomly sampled 485 subcohort participants as the comparison group with the follow-up to April 2006. Baseline serum levels of CML-AGE, sRAGE, glucose and insulin were determined. Weighted Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to calculate relative risks (RR) and 95% CI.
Comparing highest with lowest quintile of sRAGE, the RR for incident colorectal cancer was 0.65 (95% CI, 0.39-1.07; P(trend) = 0.03), adjusting for age, years of smoking, body mass index, and CML-AGE. Further adjustment for serum glucose strengthened the association (RR = 0.52; 95% CI, 0.30-0.89; P(trend) = 0.009). Highest quintile of CML-AGE was not associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (multivariate RR = 1.20; 95% CI, 0.64-2.26).
Higher prediagnostic levels of serum sRAGE were associated with lower risk of colorectal cancer in male smokers.
This is the first epidemiologic study to implicate the receptor for AGEs in colorectal cancer development.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21527578 View in PubMed
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Arsenic concentrations in prediagnostic toenails and the risk of bladder cancer in a cohort study of male smokers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177829
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Nov 1;160(9):853-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2004

Association of Helicobacter pylori IgA antibodies with the risk of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171090
Source
World J Gastroenterol. 2005 Nov 21;11(43):6871-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-21-2005
Author
Timo U Kosunen
Kari Seppala
Seppo Sarna
Arpo Aromaa
Paul Knekt
Jarmo Virtamo
Anniina Salomaa-Rasanen
Hilpi Rautelin
Author Affiliation
Department of Bacteriology and Immunology, University of Helsinki, PO Box 21, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland. timo.kosunen@helsinki.fi
Source
World J Gastroenterol. 2005 Nov 21;11(43):6871-4
Date
Nov-21-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Antigens, Bacterial - immunology
Finland
Helicobacter Infections - immunology
Helicobacter pylori - immunology
Humans
Immunoglobulin A - blood
Immunoglobulin G - immunology
Middle Aged
Peptic Ulcer - immunology - microbiology
Risk factors
Stomach Neoplasms - immunology - microbiology
Abstract
To compare the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) IgG and IgA antibodies between adult subjects, with defined gastric diseases, non-defined gastric disorders and those representing the population.
Data on H pylori IgG and IgA antibodies, determined by enzyme immunoassay, were analyzed in 3,252 subjects with DGD including 482 patients with gastric ulcer, 882 patients with duodenal ulcer, 1,525 patients with chronic gastritis only and 363 subjects with subsequent gastric cancer, 19,145 patients with NoDg and 4,854 POPUL subjects. The age-adjusted prevalences were calculated for 1- and 20-year age cohorts.
The prevalences of IgG antibodies were equally high (89-96%) in all 20-year age cohorts of the DGD groups, whereas the prevalences of IgG antibodies were lower and increased by age in the POPUL and NoDg groups. The prevalences of IgA antibodies were also higher in the DGD groups; among them CA (84-89%) and GU groups (78-91%) showed significantly higher prevalences than DU (68-77%) and CG patients (59-74%) (OR 2.49, 95%CI 1.86-3.34 between the GU and DU groups). In the CA, GU, and DU groups, the IgA prevalences showed only minor variation according to age, while they increased by age in the CG, POPUL, and NoDg groups (P
PubMed ID
16425400 View in PubMed
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Black tea consumption and risk of stroke in women and men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117466
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2013 Mar;23(3):157-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Susanna C Larsson
Jarmo Virtamo
Alicja Wolk
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden. Susanna.Larsson@ki.se
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2013 Mar;23(3):157-60
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Stroke - epidemiology - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
Tea
Abstract
Our aim was examine the association between black tea consumption and risk of total stroke and stroke types in a prospective study.
A total of 74,961 Swedish women and men who were free of cardiovascular disease and cancer at baseline in 1997 were followed up through December 2008. Tea consumption was assessed with a questionnaire at baseline. Stroke cases were ascertained from the Swedish Hospital Discharge Registry.
During a mean follow-up of 10.2 years, we ascertained 4089 cases of first stroke, including 3159 cerebral infarctions, 435 intracerebral hemorrhages, 148 subarachnoid hemorrhages, and 347 unspecified strokes. After adjustment for other risk factors, high tea consumption was associated with a significantly lower risk of total stroke; however, there was no dose-response relation (P for trend = .36). Compared with no tea consumption, the multivariable relative risk for four or more cups per day (median, 5) was 0.79 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.62-0.998). The corresponding relative risks were 0.80 (95% CI, 0.61-1.04) for cerebral infarction and 0.68 (95% CI, 0.35-1.30) for hemorrhagic stroke.
These findings suggest that daily consumption of four or more cups of black tea is inversely associated with risk of stroke.
PubMed ID
23295000 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence in a cohort of Finnish male smokers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170359
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 2006 Apr;15(2):103-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Nea Malila
Mikko J Virtanen
Jarmo Virtamo
Demetrius Albanes
Eero Pukkala
Author Affiliation
Finnish Cancer Registry, Institute for Statistical and Epidemiological Cancer Research, Helsinki, Finland. nea.malila@cancer.fi
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 2006 Apr;15(2):103-7
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Registries
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
A total of 29,133 male smokers, aged 50-69 years, were recruited into the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Study in 1984-1988. The nationwide Finnish Cancer Registry (FCR) recorded 5944 incident cases of cancer in this cohort through the end of 1999. Compared with the FCR data of the entire Finnish male population of same age the standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of total cancer in the ATBC cohort was 1.55 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.51-1.59]. There was a significant excess of established smoking-related malignancies, such as lung cancer (SIR 2.45, 95% CI 2.35-2.56), and cancers of the tongue, mouth, pharynx, larynx, oesophagus, pancreas, stomach, liver, urinary bladder and kidney. In addition to these sites, cancers of the prostate and colon were slightly more common in the ATBC cohort than in the total Finnish male population (SIR 1.10, 95% CI 1.04-1.18 and SIR 1.14, 95% CI 1.00-1.30, respectively). In conclusion, the risk of many cancers was significantly higher in the ATBC Study cohort compared with the total Finnish male population of same age. In addition to the well known smoking-related cancers, cigarette smoking may increase slightly the risk of colon and prostate cancer, too.
PubMed ID
16523006 View in PubMed
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CHRNA5/CHRNA3 Locus Associates with Increased Mortality among Smokers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287426
Source
COPD. 2016 Aug;13(4):464-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Henna Kupiainen
Mikko Kuokkanen
Jukka Kontto
Jarmo Virtamo
Veikko Salomaa
Ari Lindqvist
Maritta Kilpeläinen
Tarja Laitinen
Source
COPD. 2016 Aug;13(4):464-70
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Female
Finland
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Logistic Models
Lung Neoplasms - genetics - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Neoplasms - genetics - mortality
Nerve Tissue Proteins - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - genetics - mortality
Receptors, Nicotinic - genetics
Smoking - genetics - mortality
Abstract
Polymorphisms in the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene (CHRNA5/CHRNA3 locus) have been associated with several smoking related traits such as nicotine dependence, cigarette consumption, smoking cessation, lung cancer, and COPD. The aim of this candidate gene study was to study the locus among the Finnish COPD patients and long-term smokers with regard to COPD risk, smoking behavior, cancer, and all-cause mortality. Genotyping of rs1051730, the locus tagging SNP was done in two longitudinal cohorts: Finnish COPD patients (N = 575, 74% men) and long-term smokers, all men (N = 1911). Finnish population sample (N = 1730) was used as controls. The analyses were done using logistic and Cox regression. The main findings were that the minor allele increased the risk of COPD when compared to the Finnish population at large (OR = 1.4, 95% CI 1.2-1.7, p = 3.2 × 10-5). Homozygosity for the risk allele was associated in both cohorts with all-cause mortality (crude HR 2.2, 95% CI 1.2-3.8 and 1.3, 95% CI 1.1-1.5, respectively), with any type of cancer (crude OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.0-5.1) among the COPD patients and with the number of pack-years (crude OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.1-1.9) among the male smokers. CHRNA5/CHRNA3 locus tagged by rs1051730, which has been previously associated with several smoking related diseases was now shown to be associated also with increased all-cause mortality among long-term smokers with or without clinical COPD further emphasizing the clinical importance of the finding.
PubMed ID
26751916 View in PubMed
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Cigarette smoking and cancer: intensity patterns in the alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene cancer prevention study in Finnish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158979
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2008 Apr 15;167(8):970-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2008
Author
Jay H Lubin
Jarmo Virtamo
Stephanie J Weinstein
Demetrius Albanes
Author Affiliation
Biostatistics Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD 20852, USA.lubinj@mail.nih.gov
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2008 Apr 15;167(8):970-5
Date
Apr-15-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Finland - epidemiology
Food Habits
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Nutritional Status
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Time Factors
alpha-Tocopherol - pharmacology
beta Carotene - pharmacology
Abstract
Relative risks for lung and bladder cancers by smoking intensity level off at more than 15-20 cigarettes per day. A three-parameter excess relative risk model in pack-years and intensity quantified this leveling (Lubin et al., Am J Epidemiol 2007;166:479-89). Above 15-20 cigarettes per day was an "inverse exposure rate" effect whereby, for equal pack-years, the excess relative risk/pack-year decreased with increasing intensity; that is, smoking at a lower intensity for a longer duration was more deleterious than smoking at a higher intensity for a shorter duration. After adjustment for pack-years, intensity effects were quantitatively homogeneous across multiple case-control studies of lung, bladder, oral cavity, pancreas, and esophagus cancers. The authors extended those analyses to examine intensity patterns for incident bladder, esophagus, kidney, larynx, liver, lung, oropharynx, and pancreas cancers by using data from a single prospective cohort in Finland, the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study, with follow-up from enrollment, which occurred between 1985 and 1988, through April 2004. At more than 10 cigarettes per day, they found an inverse exposure rate pattern for each cancer site. After adjustment for pack-years, intensity effects were quantitatively homogeneous across the diverse cancer sites and homogeneous with intensity effects from the prior analysis of multiple studies. Consistency of intensity patterns suggested a general phenomenon and may provide clues to the molecular basis of smoking-related cancer risk.
PubMed ID
18250081 View in PubMed
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Coffee and tea consumption and risk of stroke subtypes in male smokers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158068
Source
Stroke. 2008 Jun;39(6):1681-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Susanna C Larsson
Satu Männistö
Mikko J Virtanen
Jukka Kontto
Demetrius Albanes
Jarmo Virtamo
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@ki.se
Source
Stroke. 2008 Jun;39(6):1681-7
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Antioxidants - therapeutic use
Cerebral Hemorrhage - drug therapy - epidemiology - prevention & control
Coffee
Cohort Studies
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypoxia-Ischemia, Brain - drug therapy - epidemiology - prevention & control
Insulin Resistance - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Stroke - drug therapy - epidemiology - prevention & control
Tea
Abstract
Coffee and tea consumption could potentially reduce the risk of stroke because these beverages have antioxidant properties, and coffee may improve insulin sensitivity. We examined the associations of coffee and tea consumption with risk of stroke subtypes.
We used prospective data from the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study, a cohort study of 26 556 male Finnish smokers aged 50 to 69 years without a history of stroke at baseline. Coffee and tea consumption was assessed at baseline using a validated food-frequency questionnaire. During a mean follow-up of 13.6 years, from 1985 through December 2004, 2702 cerebral infarctions, 383 intracerebral hemorrhages, and 196 subarachnoid hemorrhages were ascertained from national registries.
After adjustment for age and cardiovascular risk factors, both consumption of coffee and tea was statistically significantly inversely associated with the risk of cerebral infarction but not intracerebral or subarachnoid hemorrhage. The multivariate relative risk of cerebral infarction for men in the highest category of coffee consumption (>/=8 cups/d) was 0.77 (95% CI, 0.66 to 0.90; P for trend /=2 cups/d) with those in the lowest category (nondrinkers) was 0.79 (95% CI, 0.68 to 0.92; P for trend=0.002).
These results suggest that high consumption of coffee and tea may reduce the risk of cerebral infarction among men, independent of known cardiovascular risk factors.
PubMed ID
18369170 View in PubMed
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Coffee consumption and risk of stroke in women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136282
Source
Stroke. 2011 Apr;42(4):908-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Susanna C Larsson
Jarmo Virtamo
Alicja Wolk
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@ki.se
Source
Stroke. 2011 Apr;42(4):908-12
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Caffeine - therapeutic use
Cerebral Infarction - drug therapy - epidemiology - prevention & control
Coffee
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires - standards
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Self Report
Stroke - drug therapy - epidemiology - prevention & control
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage - drug therapy - epidemiology - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Coffee consumption has been inconsistently associated with stroke incidence and mortality in previous studies. We investigated the association between coffee consumption and stroke incidence in the Swedish Mammography Cohort.
We prospectively followed of 34,670 women without a history of cardiovascular disease or cancer at baseline in 1997. Coffee consumption was assessed in 1997 using a self-administered questionnaire. Incident stroke cases were ascertained from the Swedish Hospital Discharge Registry.
During a mean follow-up of 10.4 years, we ascertained 1680 stroke events, including 1310 cerebral infarctions, 154 intracerebral hemorrhages, 79 subarachnoid hemorrhages, and 137 unspecified strokes. After adjustment for other risk factors, coffee consumption was associated with a statistically significant lower risk of total stroke, cerebral infarction, and subarachnoid hemorrhage but not intracerebral hemorrhage. The multivariable relative risks of total stroke across categories of coffee consumption (
PubMed ID
21393590 View in PubMed
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87 records – page 1 of 9.