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11-year follow-up of mortality in patients with schizophrenia: a population-based cohort study (FIN11 study).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149701
Source
Lancet. 2009 Aug 22;374(9690):620-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-22-2009
Author
Jari Tiihonen
Jouko Lönnqvist
Kristian Wahlbeck
Timo Klaukka
Leo Niskanen
Antti Tanskanen
Jari Haukka
Author Affiliation
Department of Forensic Psychiatry, University of Kuopio and Niuvanniemi Hospital, Department of Clinical Physiology, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland. jari.tiihonen@niuva.fi
Source
Lancet. 2009 Aug 22;374(9690):620-7
Date
Aug-22-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Antipsychotic Agents - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Cause of Death
Clozapine - adverse effects
Dibenzothiazepines - adverse effects
Drug Utilization - trends
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Life expectancy
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Perphenazine - adverse effects
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - drug therapy - mortality
Sex Distribution
Time Factors
Abstract
The introduction of second-generation antipsychotic drugs during the 1990s is widely believed to have adversely affected mortality of patients with schizophrenia. Our aim was to establish the long-term contribution of antipsychotic drugs to mortality in such patients.
Nationwide registers in Finland were used to compare the cause-specific mortality in 66 881 patients versus the total population (5.2 million) between 1996, and 2006, and to link these data with the use of antipsychotic drugs. We measured the all-cause mortality of patients with schizophrenia in outpatient care during current and cumulative exposure to any antipsychotic drug versus no use of these drugs, and exposure to the six most frequently used antipsychotic drugs compared with perphenazine use.
Although the proportional use of second-generation antipsychotic drugs rose from 13% to 64% during follow-up, the gap in life expectancy between patients with schizophrenia and the general population did not widen between 1996 (25 years), and 2006 (22.5 years). Compared with current use of perphenazine, the highest risk for overall mortality was recorded for quetiapine (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.41, 95% CI 1.09-1.82), and the lowest risk for clozapine (0.74, 0.60-0.91; p=0.0045 for the difference between clozapine vs perphenazine, and p
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Nov 7;374(9701):1591; author reply 1592-319897117
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Nov 7;374(9701):1591; author reply 1592-319897118
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Aug 22;374(9690):590-219595448
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Nov 7;374(9701):1592; author reply 1592-319897121
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Nov 7;374(9701):1592; author reply 1592-319897120
PubMed ID
19595447 View in PubMed
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20-Year Nationwide Follow-Up Study on Discontinuation of Antipsychotic Treatment in First-Episode Schizophrenia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301781
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 2018 08 01; 175(8):765-773
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-01-2018
Author
Jari Tiihonen
Antti Tanskanen
Heidi Taipale
Author Affiliation
From the Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm; the Department of Forensic Psychiatry, University of Eastern Finland, and Niuvanniemi Hospital, Kuopio; the Impact Assessment Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki; and the School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio.
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 2018 08 01; 175(8):765-773
Date
08-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Recurrence
Registries
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - drug therapy
Withholding Treatment
Abstract
It is generally believed that after the first episode of schizophrenia, the risk of relapse decreases with time in patients who are stabilized. Many treatment guidelines recommend that after stabilization, antipsychotic treatment should be continued for 1-5 years, and longer exposure should be avoided if possible. However, there is no published evidence to substantiate this view. The authors used nationwide databases to investigate this issue.
Prospectively gathered nationwide register data were used to study the risk of treatment failure (psychiatric rehospitalization or death) after discontinuation of antipsychotic treatment. Multivariate Cox regression was used to assess outcomes among all patients hospitalized for the first time with a schizophrenia diagnosis in Finland during the period of 1996-2014 (N=8,719).
The lowest risk of rehospitalization or death was observed for patients who received antipsychotic treatment continuously (adjusted hazard ratio=1.00), followed by patients who discontinued antipsychotic use immediately after discharge from the first hospital treatment (hazard ratio=1.63, 95% CI=1.52-1.75), within 1 year (hazard ratio=1.88, 95% CI=1.57-2.24), within 1-2 years (hazard ratio=2.12, 95% CI=1.43-3.14), within 2-5 years (hazard ratio=3.26, 95% CI=2.07-5.13), and after 5 years (a median of 7.9 years) (hazard ratio=7.28, 95% CI=2.78-19.05). Risk of death was 174%-214% higher among nonusers and patients with early discontinuation of antipsychotics compared with patients who received antipsychotic treatment continuously for up to 16.4 years.
Whatever the underlying mechanisms, these results provide evidence that, contrary to general belief, the risk of treatment failure or relapse after discontinuation of antipsychotic use does not decrease as a function of time during the first 8 years of illness, and that long-term antipsychotic treatment is associated with increased survival.
Notes
CommentIn: Am J Psychiatry. 2018 Aug 1;175(8):712-713 PMID 30064241
CommentIn: Am J Psychiatry. 2018 Sep 1;175(9):908-909 PMID 30173547
CommentIn: Am J Psychiatry. 2018 Sep 1;175(9):909 PMID 30173555
CommentIn: Am J Psychiatry. 2018 Dec 1;175(12):1266-1267 PMID 30501413
CommentIn: Am J Psychiatry. 2018 Dec 1;175(12):1267 PMID 30501421
PubMed ID
29621900 View in PubMed
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Analysis of monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) promoter polymorphism in Finnish male alcoholics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190759
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2002 Mar 15;109(2):113-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-2002
Author
Takuya Saito
Herbert M Lachman
Libna Diaz
Tero Hallikainen
Jussi Kauhanen
Jukka T Salonen
Olli-Pekka Ryynänen
Matti K Karvonen
Erkka Syvälahti
Tiina Pohjalainen
Jarmo Hietala
Jari Tiihonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461, USA.
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2002 Mar 15;109(2):113-9
Date
Mar-15-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - classification - genetics
Alleles
Aneuploidy
Antisocial Personality Disorder - genetics
Finland
Genetic Linkage - genetics
Heterozygote Detection
Humans
Klinefelter Syndrome - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Monoamine Oxidase - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic - genetics
Promoter Regions, Genetic - genetics
X Chromosome
Abstract
Alterations in monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) expression and enzyme activity may be associated with alcoholism and impulsive behavior. Therefore, functional polymorphisms in the MAOA gene would be good candidates to consider in the interindividual differences that exist in the susceptibility to alcoholism. One variant that has been considered as a candidate in alcoholism is a repeat polymorphism in the MAOA gene promoter. We analyzed a cohort of Finnish males with either type 1 or type 2 alcoholism, as well as controls, for differences in the distribution of MAOA promoter alleles. Based on other studies, we postulated that type 2 alcoholism, which is associated with antisocial behavior, but not type 1 alcoholism, would be correlated with the inheritance of the low promoter activity allele. However, we failed to find a difference in allele distribution in type 1 and type 2 alcoholics. In addition, there was no difference in the allele distribution when each group of alcoholics was compared with controls. However, when both groups of alcoholics were pooled and compared with controls, the difference in allele distribution reached a trend towards significance. Our results suggest a minimal association between the MAOA low activity promoter alleles and alcoholism, regardless of the presence or absence of antisocial behavior. Interestingly, approximately 3% of type 2 alcoholics were found to be heterozygous for the MAOA promoter polymorphism. Since MAOA is X-linked, the heterozygotes are probable cases of Klinefelter's syndrome (47,XXY) suggesting that X-chromosome aneuploidy may increase the risk for developing type 2 alcoholism.
PubMed ID
11927135 View in PubMed
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Antidementia drug use among community-dwelling individuals with Alzheimer's disease in Finland: a nationwide register-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260126
Source
Int Clin Psychopharmacol. 2014 Jul;29(4):216-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Heidi Taipale
Antti Tanskanen
Marjaana Koponen
Anna-Maija Tolppanen
Jari Tiihonen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Source
Int Clin Psychopharmacol. 2014 Jul;29(4):216-23
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - drug therapy
Cholinesterase Inhibitors - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Drug Monitoring
Drug Prescriptions
Drug Therapy, Combination - adverse effects
Excitatory Amino Acid Antagonists - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Galantamine - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Indans - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Male
Memantine - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Nootropic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Phenylcarbamates - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Piperidines - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Abstract
The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (AChEI) and memantine use, duration of treatment, concomitant use of these drugs, and factors associated with the discontinuation of AChEI therapy during 2006-2009. We utilized data from a nationwide sample of community-dwelling individuals with a clinically verified Alzheimer's disease diagnosed during the year 2005 (n=6858) as a part of the MEDALZ-2005 study. During the 4-year follow-up, 84% used AChEI and 47% used memantine. Altogether, 22% of the sample used both drugs concomitantly. The median duration of the first AChEI use period was 860 (interquartile range 295-1458) days and 1103 (interquartile range 489-1487) days for the total duration of AChEI use. Although 20% of the AChEI users discontinued the use during the first year, over half of them restarted later. The risk of discontinuation was higher for rivastigmine [hazard ratio 1.34 (confidence interval 1.22-1.48)] and galantamine users [hazard ratio 1.23 (confidence interval 1.15-1.37)] compared with donepezil users in the adjusted model. In conclusion, median time for AChEI use was over 3 years and every fifth Alzheimer's disease patient used AChEI and memantine concomitantly during the follow-up. The low rate of discontinuation is consistent with the Finnish Care Guideline but in contrast to the results reported from many other countries.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24608822 View in PubMed
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Antidepressants and the risk of suicide, attempted suicide, and overall mortality in a nationwide cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166258
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2006 Dec;63(12):1358-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Jari Tiihonen
Jouko Lönnqvist
Kristian Wahlbeck
Timo Klaukka
Antti Tanskanen
Jari Haukka
Author Affiliation
Department of Forensic Psychiatry, University of Kuopio and Niuvanniemi Hospital, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland. Jari.Tiihonen@niuva.fi
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2006 Dec;63(12):1358-67
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antidepressive Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cause of Death
Child
Cohort Studies
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy - epidemiology - mortality
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk factors
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
It is unknown if antidepressant treatment is associated with either increased or decreased risk of suicide.
To estimate the risk of suicide, attempted suicide, and overall mortality during antidepressant treatments in a real-life setting with high statistical power.
A cohort study in which all subjects without psychosis, hospitalized because of a suicide attempt from January 1, 1997, to December 31, 2003, in Finland, were followed up through a nationwide computerized database.
A total of 15 390 patients with a mean follow-up of 3.4 years.
The propensity score-adjusted relative risks (RRs) during monotherapy with the most frequently used antidepressants compared with no antidepressant treatment.
In the entire cohort, fluoxetine use was associated with the lowest risk (RR, 0.52; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.30-0.93), and venlafaxine hydrochloride use with the highest risk (RR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.01-2.57), of suicide. A substantially lower mortality was observed during selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor use (RR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.49-0.71; P
Notes
Comment In: Evid Based Ment Health. 2007 Aug;10(3):9017652572
PubMed ID
17146010 View in PubMed
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Antidepressant use and mortality in Finland: a register-linkage study from a nationwide cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152280
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2009 Jul;65(7):715-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Jari Haukka
Martti Arffman
Timo Partonen
Sinikka Sihvo
Marko Elovainio
Jari Tiihonen
Jouko Lönnqvist
Ilmo Keskimäki
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. jari.haukka@thl.fi
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2009 Jul;65(7):715-20
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antidepressive Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Data Collection
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Prescriptions
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
It is generally acknowledged that depressed patients need specific attention during the first weeks after initiation of antidepressant (AD) treatment because of the increased risk of suicide.
The study population consisted of all individuals residing in Finland from 1999 to 2003 who had purchased a prescribed antidepressant at least once but had no preceding antidepressant prescription. Data sources were the National Prescription Register, the Causes of Death Register, Census Data of Statistics Finland, and the National Care Register. Follow-up started at the first purchase and ended at the end of 2003 or death. Data on prescriptions were used to construct contiguous treatment periods of follow-up time. Life-table analysis with Poisson regression was used to estimate risk ratios (RR) of antidepressant use with respect to all-cause mortality and to deaths from suicide.
Current AD use was associated with a lowered all-cause mortality (RR = 0.18, 95% CI = 0.18-0.19) compared with those who filled one previous prescription only. There was no difference in suicide mortality when any current antidepressant usage was compared to the one-prescription group. Current SSRI usage was associated with lower risk of suicide compared to the one-prescription or other antidepressant groups (RR 0.47, 0.38-0.59).
Current AD treatment is associated with decreased all-cause mortality rates in patients who have ever had AD treatment.
PubMed ID
19259654 View in PubMed
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Antidepressant use and risk of hip fractures among community-dwelling persons with and without Alzheimer's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292637
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2017 12; 32(12):e107-e115
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2017
Author
Sanna Torvinen-Kiiskinen
Anna-Maija Tolppanen
Marjaana Koponen
Antti Tanskanen
Jari Tiihonen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Heidi Taipale
Author Affiliation
Kuopio Research Centre of Geriatric Care, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2017 12; 32(12):e107-e115
Date
12-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - complications
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hip Fractures - epidemiology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
To study whether antidepressant use is associated with an increased risk of hip fracture among community-dwelling persons with and without Alzheimer's disease (AD), and to compare the risk according to duration of use and between antidepressant groups.
Retrospective cohort study, including 50,491 persons with AD (mean age 80) and 100,982 comparison persons without AD from Finnish register-based MEDALZ cohort. Antidepressant use was compared with nonuse with Cox proportional hazard models. Incident users were identified with a one year washout period from Prescription register data. Main outcome was hospitalization due to hip fracture.
During antidepressant use, the age-adjusted rate of hip fractures per 100 person-years was 3.01 (95% CI 2.75-3.34) among persons with and 2.28 (1.94-2.61) among persons without AD. Antidepressant use was associated with an increased risk of hip fracture among persons with and without AD (adjusted HR 1.61, 95% CI 1.45-1.80 and 2.71, 2.35-3.14, respectively) compared with nonuse. The risk was most prominent in the beginning of use and was elevated even up to 4 years. The risk was increased with all of the most frequently used antidepressants.
Antidepressant use is associated with an increased risk of hip fracture among older persons. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Notes
CommentIn: Evid Based Nurs. 2017 Jul;20(3):94 PMID 28601807
PubMed ID
28055139 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antipsychotic doses among community-dwelling persons with Alzheimer disease in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266764
Source
J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2014 Aug;34(4):435-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Heidi Taipale
Marjaana Koponen
Antti Tanskanen
Anna-Maija Tolppanen
Jari Tiihonen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Source
J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2014 Aug;34(4):435-40
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - drug therapy - epidemiology - psychology
Antipsychotic Agents - administration & dosage
Cohort Studies
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Residence Characteristics
Abstract
Use of antipsychotics for treatment of behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia is frequent among persons with Alzheimer disease (AD). Doses used in long-term therapy have not been previously reported. We describe antipsychotic doses used among community-dwelling persons with AD and investigate factors associated with high-dose use. The MEDALZ-2005 (Medication use and Alzheimer disease) cohort is a nationwide sample including all persons with clinically diagnosed AD at the end of year 2005 in Finland (n = 28,093). Data including prescriptions, comorbidities, and hospital discharge diagnoses were collected from nationwide registers. Antipsychotic doses in monotherapy were investigated during 2006 to 2009. Among 8920 antipsychotic users, 4% (n = 336) used antipsychotics with high dose. Typical antipsychotics were more often used with high dose than atypical antipsychotics. High-dose use was associated with younger age (
PubMed ID
24875073 View in PubMed
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Antipsychotic polypharmacy among a nationwide sample of community-dwelling persons with Alzheimer's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261391
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2014;41(4):1223-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Heidi Taipale
Marjaana Koponen
Antti Tanskanen
Anna-Maija Tolppanen
Jari Tiihonen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2014;41(4):1223-8
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - drug therapy - epidemiology - psychology
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Polypharmacy
Residence Characteristics
Abstract
Antipsychotic polypharmacy (APP) is not recommended in treatment of behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD). There is lack of studies concerning prevalence of APP among persons with dementia.
The objective of our study was to describe prevalence and risk factors associated with antipsychotic polypharmacy among antipsychotic users with Alzheimer's disease (AD).
Data from nationwide MEDALZ-2005 cohort including all community-dwelling persons diagnosed with AD in Finland was utilized. Register-based data included prescriptions, comorbidities, and hospital discharge diagnoses. Users of antipsychotics during 2006-2009 were included (n = 9,803). The risk of starting antipsychotic polypharmacy was evaluated with Cox proportional hazards model.
Prevalence of antipsychotic polypharmacy was 8% (n = 750) among antipsychotic users (n = 9,803). Quetiapine and risperidone was the most common combination of two antipsychotics followed by combination of quetiapine and haloperidol. Antipsychotic polypharmacy was associated with younger age (HR 1.35 [Confidence Interval, CI, 1.16-1.56]), male gender (HR 1.18 [CI 1.02-1.38]), and history of psychiatric disorder (HR 1.50 [CI 1.26-1.78]) in the adjusted model.
In conclusion, we found higher prevalence of APP than previously reported among older populations. This is concerning since effectiveness of APP has not been demonstrated and APP is not recommended in the treatment of BPSD. Clinicians should pay more attention to avoid APP and use of antipsychotics to other indications than BPSD among persons with AD.
PubMed ID
24787914 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antipsychotic treatment and mortality in schizophrenia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269903
Source
Schizophr Bull. 2015 May;41(3):656-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Minna Torniainen
Ellenor Mittendorfer-Rutz
Antti Tanskanen
Charlotte Björkenstam
Jaana Suvisaari
Kristina Alexanderson
Jari Tiihonen
Source
Schizophr Bull. 2015 May;41(3):656-63
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antipsychotic Agents - adverse effects - pharmacology
Cardiovascular Diseases - chemically induced - mortality
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Schizophrenia - drug therapy - mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
It is generally believed that long-term use of antipsychotics increases mortality and, especially, the risk of cardiovascular death. However, there are no solid data to substantiate this view.
We identified all individuals in Sweden with schizophrenia diagnoses before year 2006 (N = 21 492), aged 17-65 years, and persons with first-episode schizophrenia during the follow-up 2006-2010 (N = 1230). Patient information was prospectively collected through nationwide registers. Total and cause-specific mortalities were calculated as a function of cumulative antipsychotic exposure from January 2006 to December 2010.
Compared with age- and gender-matched controls from the general population (N = 214920), the highest overall mortality was observed among patients with no antipsychotic exposure (hazard ratio [HR] = 6.3, 95% CI: 5.5-7.3), ie, 0.0 defined daily dose (DDD)/day, followed by high exposure (>1.5 DDD/day) group (HR = 5.7, 5.2-6.2), low exposure (
Notes
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PubMed ID
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