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Adolescent alcohol use reflects community-level alcohol consumption irrespective of parental drinking.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113104
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2013 Sep;53(3):368-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Pernille Bendtsen
Mogens Trab Damsgaard
Janne Schurmann Tolstrup
Annette Kjær Ersbøll
Bjørn E Holstein
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark. pebn@niph.dk
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2013 Sep;53(3):368-73
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Alcoholic Intoxication - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Parents
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
Risk factors for adolescent alcohol use are typically conceptualized at the individual level, and school- and community-level risk factors have received little attention. Based on the theoretical understanding of youth alcohol consumption as a reflection of community social practice, we analyzed whether adolescent drunkenness was related to community-level adult alcohol use (AAC), when taking individual and school-level risk factors for drunkenness into account. Furthermore, we investigated whether the association between community-level AAC and adolescent drunkenness was attenuated after inclusion of parental drinking.
We used data from three sources: data about adolescent drunkenness from the Health Behavior in School-Aged Children 2010 survey (N = 2,911; 13- to 15-year-olds nested in 175 school classes and 51 schools); data about community-level AAC derived from the Danish National Health Survey 2010 (177,639 participants); and data on school-level variables from Health Behavior in School-Aged Children School Leader Survey 2010. We performed multilevel logistic regression analysis with data from students nested within school classes and schools.
Overall, 33.5% of students had been drunk twice or more. High community-level AAC was significantly associated with adolescent drunkenness (odds ratio [95% confidence interval], 1.94 [1.21-3.11]). Parental drinking was strongly related to adolescent drunkenness but did not attenuate the relationship between community-level AAC and adolescent drunkenness. We found no association between adolescent drunkenness and school-level variables (youth friendly environment, alcohol education, and exposure to alcohol outlets).
Adolescent drunkenness was associated with community-level AAC and was not explained by parental drinking.
PubMed ID
23763965 View in PubMed
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"After all--it doesn't kill you to quit smoking": an explorative analysis of the blog in a smoking cessation intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113715
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 Nov;41(7):655-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Caroline Lyng Brandt
Peter Dalum
Lise Skov-Ettrup
Janne Schurmann Tolstrup
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 Nov;41(7):655-61
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Blogging
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Program Evaluation
Smoking - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation - methods - psychology
Social Support
Young Adult
Abstract
A growing body of literature demonstrates internet-based smoking cessation interventions as a promising aid in helping people quit smoking. However, the underlying mechanisms of how these interventions influence the cessation process are still relatively unknown. Several studies have indicated blogging as a potential source in providing social support to users of internet-based smoking cessation interventions and thereby enhance their change of succeeding in quitting.
The study aimed to investigate themes discussed on a blog in an internet-based smoking cessation intervention. In addition, we examined if blogging could provide social support for people in a smoking cessation process.
The study was based on messages posted from 1 January 2012 to 29 February 2012 on the blog of the internet-based smoking cessation programme DDSP, operated by the Danish Cancer Society. Messages were coded according to themes using Grounded Theory, and additionally data about bloggers were analyzed.
In total, 1663 messages were posted within the 2-month period, and we identified 16 themes. The majority of messages contained personal stories or experiences (53%), provided emotional support (34%) or congratulated other users (17%). The messages were found capable of supplying social support to members on the blog. In addition, we found that only a minority of users who viewed the blog participated actively in posting messages, and only a minority was highly active bloggers.
The blog offers a unique platform for informal conversations about quitting smoking and is important in providing social support to people in a smoking cessation process.
PubMed ID
23696257 View in PubMed
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Alcohol-attributable and alcohol-preventable mortality in Denmark: an analysis of which intake levels contribute most to alcohol's harmful and beneficial effects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106686
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2014 Jan;29(1):15-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Marie Eliasen
Ulrik Becker
Morten Grønbæk
Knud Juel
Janne Schurmann Tolstrup
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Øster Farimagsgade 5A, 2nd Floor, 1353, Copenhagen K, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2014 Jan;29(1):15-26
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - mortality - prevention & control
Alcohol-Related Disorders - complications - mortality - prevention & control
Alcoholic Intoxication - complications - mortality
Cause of Death
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the study was to quantify alcohol-attributable and -preventable mortality, totally and stratified on alcohol consumption in Denmark 2010, and to estimate alcohol-related mortality assuming different scenarios of changes in alcohol distribution in the population. We estimated alcohol-attributable and -preventable fractions based on relative risks of conditions causally associated with alcohol from meta-analyses and information on alcohol consumption in Denmark obtained from 14,458 participants in the Danish National Health Survey 2010 and corrected for adult per capita consumption. Cause-specific mortality data were obtained from the Danish Register of Causes of Death. In total, 1,373 deaths among women (5.0% of all deaths) and 2,522 deaths among men (9.5% of all deaths) were attributable to alcohol, while an estimated number of 765 (2.8%) and 583 (2.2%) deaths were prevented by alcohol. Of the alcohol-attributable deaths, 73 and 81% occurred within the high alcohol consumption group (>14/21 drinks/week for women/men). A reduction of 50% in the alcohol consumption was associated with a decrease of 1,406 partly alcohol-attributable deaths (46%) and 37 alcohol-preventable deaths (3%). Total compliance with sensible drinking guidelines with a low risk limit (
PubMed ID
24129661 View in PubMed
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Alcohol use as predictor for infertility in a representative population of Danish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9692
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2003 Aug;82(8):744-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Janne Schurmann Tolstrup
Susanne Krüger Kjaer
Claus Holst
Heidi Sharif
Christian Munk
Merete Osler
Lone Schmidt
Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen
Morten Grønbaek
Author Affiliation
Center for Alcohol Research, National Institute of Public Health, and Institute of Preventive Medicine, Copenhagen Hospital Corporation, Denmark. jst@niph.dk
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2003 Aug;82(8):744-9
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Infertility, Female - epidemiology - etiology
Maternal Age
Population Surveillance
Predictive value of tests
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Our aim was to examine the association between use of alcohol and subsequent incidence of primary infertility. METHODS: The study subjects were chosen from a population-based cohort of Danish women aged 20-29 years. Eligible women were nulliparous and not pregnant (n = 7760). Information on alcohol intake and potential confounders (age, education, marital status, diseases in the reproductive organs, and cigarette smoking) was assessed at enrollment. The incidence of fertility problems during follow-up was obtained by record linkage with the Danish Hospital Discharge Register and the Danish Infertility Cohort Register. Main outcome measures were hazard ratios of infertility according to alcohol intake at baseline estimated in a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model. RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 4.9 years, 368 women had experienced infertility. Alcohol intake at baseline was unassociated with infertility among younger women, but was a significant predictor for infertility among women above age 30. In this age group, the adjusted hazard ratio for consuming seven or more drinks per week was 2.26 (95% confidence interval: 1.19-4.32) compared with women consuming less than one drink per week. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that alcohol intake is a predictor for infertility problems among women in the later reproductive age group.
PubMed ID
12848646 View in PubMed
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"A welfare recipient may be drinking, but as long as he does as told--he may drink himself to death": a qualitative analysis of project implementation barriers among Danish job consultants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266867
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:264
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Maja Bæksgaard Hansen
Stine Kloster
Ida Høgstedt Danquah
Anette Søgaard Nielsen
Ulrik Becker
Tine Tjørnhøj-Thomsen
Janne Schurmann Tolstrup
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:264
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - rehabilitation
Attitude of Health Personnel
Consultants - psychology
Denmark
Employment
Focus Groups
Humans
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Social Welfare
Urban Population
Abstract
This paper is embedded in a randomised controlled trial (Alcohol and Employment) that investigated whether welfare-to-work schemes combined with alcohol treatment were more effective than welfare-to-work schemes alone for helping unemployed welfare recipients with alcohol problems get back to employment and reduce their alcohol problems. The implementation of Alcohol and Employment turned out to be challenging, and fewer welfare recipients than expected were enrolled. The aim of this paper was to identify and investigate obstacles to the implementation of Alcohol and Employment. Our main objective was to study the job consultants' role in the implementation process as they were key personnel in conducting the trial.
The process evaluation was conducted in four Danish municipalities in 2011-2012. Data for identifying factors important for the implementation were collected through observations and focus group interviews with job consultants. Data were analysed thematically and thoroughly discussed among members of the project team; emerging themes were then grouped and read again repeatedly until the themes were consistent.
Three themes emerged as the main factors influencing the degree of implementation of Alcohol and Employment: (1) The job consultants' personal attitudes toward alcohol were an important factor. The job consultants generally did not consider a high alcohol intake to be an impediment to employment, or they thought that alcohol problems were only symptoms of more profound problems. (2) The job consultants' perception of their own roles and responsibilities in relation to the welfare recipients was a barrier: they felt that addressing alcohol problems and at the same time sustaining trust with the welfare recipient was difficult. Also, they did not consider alcohol problems to be their responsibility. (3) Shortage of time and resources among the job consultants was determined to be an influential factor.
We identified important factors at the individual level among the job consultants who threatened the implementation of Alcohol and Employment. Future studies in similar settings can take advantage of these findings when preparing interventions that are implemented by job consultants or similar professionals.
ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT01416103.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25886200 View in PubMed
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Binge drinking, drinking frequency, and risk of ischaemic heart disease: a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130333
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 Dec;39(8):880-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Lise Skrubbeltrang Skov-Ettrup
Marie Eliasen
Ola Ekholm
Morten Grønbæk
Janne Schurmann Tolstrup
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Øster Farimagsgade 5a, Copenhagen, Denmark. lse@niph.dk
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 Dec;39(8):880-7
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - etiology - mortality
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Light-to-moderate alcohol drinking is associated with a decreased risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD). However, drinking heavily and in binges has been suggested to increase IHD risk. This complexity makes the issue of binge drinking within the light-to-moderate alcohol range an important area for further investigation.
This population-based cohort study included 26,786 men and women who participated in the Danish National Cohort Study in 1994, 2000, and 2005. Binge drinking (defined >5 drinks/day) and risk of IHD and all-cause mortality was investigated among light-to-moderate drinkers (defined =21 and =14 drinks/week for men and women, respectively). In the entire study population, we investigated the association between drinking frequency, separately and combined with total weekly alcohol intake, and risk of IHD and all-cause mortality.
1136 individuals developed IHD during a mean follow up of 6.9 years. Among male light-to-moderate drinkers reporting occasional binge drinking, the hazard ratio (HR) of IHD was 0.81 (95% CI 0.61-1.08) compared to male light-to-moderate drinkers reporting no binge drinking. Corresponding HR for women was 0.97 (95% CI 0.54-1.76). For women drinking 5-6 days/week, the risk of IHD was lower than for women drinking 1-2 days/week (HR 0.54, 95% CI 0.32-0.90). We did not observe any patterns when looking at combinations of total weekly alcohol intake and drinking frequency.
Among light-to-moderate alcohol drinkers, binge drinking was not associated with risk of IHD and all-cause mortality. Overall, drinking frequency did not appear to be an important determinant of the risk of IHD and all-cause mortality.
PubMed ID
22013157 View in PubMed
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Changes in physical activity in leisure time and the risk of myocardial infarction, ischemic heart disease, and all-cause mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127264
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2012 Feb;27(2):91-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Christina Bjørk Petersen
Morten Grønbæk
Jørn Wulff Helge
Lau Caspar Thygesen
Peter Schnohr
Janne Schurmann Tolstrup
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Øster Farimagsgade 5A, 1399 Copenhagen, Denmark. cbj@niph.dk
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2012 Feb;27(2):91-9
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cause of Death
Denmark
Female
Humans
Leisure Activities
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Risk Reduction Behavior
Abstract
Physical activity is associated to a lower risk of mortality from all-causes and from coronary heart disease. The long-term effects of changes in physical activity on coronary heart disease are, however, less known. We examined the association between changes in leisure time physical activity and the risk of myocardial infarction (MI), ischemic heart disease (IHD), and all-cause mortality as well as changes in blood pressure in 4,487 men and 5,956 women in the Copenhagen City Heart Study. Physical activity was measured in 1976-1978 and 1981-1983 and participants were followed in nation-wide registers until 2009. Men who decreased physical activity by at least two levels and women who decreased by one level had a higher risk of MI relatively to an unchanged physical activity level (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.74, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 1.17-2.60 and HR = 1.30, 95% CI: 1.03-1.65). Similar associations were found for IHD although only significant in women. In all-cause mortality, men who increased physical activity had a lower risk and both men and women who reduced physical activity had a higher risk compared to an unchanged physical activity level. No association between changes in physical activity and blood pressure was observed. Findings from this prospective study suggest that changes in physical activity affect the risk of MI, IHD and all-cause mortality. A decrease in physical activity was associated to a higher risk of coronary heart disease.
PubMed ID
22311520 View in PubMed
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The Danish Health Examination Survey 2007-2008 (DANHES 2007-2008).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137689
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 Mar;39(2):203-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Louise Eriksen
Morten Grønbæk
Jørn Wulff Helge
Janne Schurmann Tolstrup
Tine Curtis
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark. lue@niph.dk
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 Mar;39(2):203-11
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Internet
Male
Middle Aged
Public Health
Questionnaires
Self Report
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The Danish Health Examination Survey (DANHES 2007-2008) was carried out by the National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, in 13 Danish municipalities in 2007-2008. The focus of the survey was diet, smoking, alcohol, and physical activity. The aim of the survey was to establish a research database for future cross-sectional and follow-up studies.
DANHES 2007-2008 included internet-based questionnaires and a health examination. There were two different questionnaires: a basic questionnaire on socio-demography, health behaviour, self-reported health status, and living conditions, and a supplementary food frequency questionnaire. The health examination contained measurements of blood pressure, resting heart rate, height, weight, fat percentage, waist and hip circumference, blood and hair samples, spirometry, bone mineral density, physical performance, muscle strength, and aerobic fitness.
A total of 76,484 people completed the basic questionnaire, and 18,065 adult individuals participated in the health examination, corresponding to a response rate of 14% and a participation rate of 10%, respectively.
The database from DANHES 2007-2008 is unique in its size and diversity of measurements and questionnaire contents. Data can be linked to various registers through the Danish civil registration system, and blood samples are stored in a biobank allowing for genetic analyses. Hence, DANHES 2007-2008 forms the basis for future research projects with a focus on health behaviour and prevention of lifestyle-related diseases.
PubMed ID
21257645 View in PubMed
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Effect of a Web-based intervention to promote physical activity and improve health among physically inactive adults: a population-based randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119342
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2012;14(5):e145
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Andreas Wolff Hansen
Morten Grønbæk
Jørn Wulff Helge
Maria Severin
Tine Curtis
Janne Schurmann Tolstrup
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark. awh@niph.dk
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2012;14(5):e145
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Internet
Motor Activity
Questionnaires
Sedentary lifestyle
Abstract
Many people in Western countries do not follow public health physical activity (PA) recommendations. Web-based interventions provide cost- and time-efficient means of delivering individually targeted lifestyle modification at a population level.
To examine whether access to a website with individually tailored feedback and suggestions on how to increase PA led to improved PA, anthropometrics, and health measurements.
Physically inactive adults (n = 12,287) participating in a nationwide eHealth survey and health examination in Denmark were randomly assigned to either an intervention (website) (n = 6055) or a no-intervention control group (n = 6232) in 2008. The intervention website was founded on the theories of stages of change and of planned behavior and, apart from a forum page where a physiotherapist answered questions about PA and training, was fully automated. After 3 and again after 6 months we emailed participants invitations to answer a Web-based follow-up questionnaire, which included the long version of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. A subgroup of participants (n = 1190) were invited to a follow-up health examination at 3 months.
Less than 22.0% (694/3156) of the participants logged on to the website once and only 7.0% (222/3159) logged on frequently. We found no difference in PA level between the website and control groups at 3- and 6-month follow-ups. By dividing participants into three groups according to use of the intervention website, we found a significant difference in total and leisure-time PA in the website group. The follow-up health examination showed no significant reductions in body mass index, waist circumference, body fat percentage, and blood pressure, or improvements in arm strength and aerobic fitness in the website group.
Based on our findings, we suggest that active users of a Web-based PA intervention can improve their level of PA. However, for unmotivated users, single-tailored feedback may be too brief. Future research should focus on developing more sophisticated interventions with the potential to reach both motivated and unmotivated sedentary individuals.
Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01295203; http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01295203 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6B7HDMqiQ).
Notes
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PubMed ID
23111127 View in PubMed
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Fracture risk prediction using phalangeal bone mineral density or FRAX(®)?-A Danish cohort study on men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114336
Source
J Clin Densitom. 2014 Jan-Mar;17(1):7-15
Publication Type
Article
Author
Teresa Friis-Holmberg
Katrine Hass Rubin
Kim Brixen
Janne Schurmann Tolstrup
Mickael Bech
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: tho@niph.dk.
Source
J Clin Densitom. 2014 Jan-Mar;17(1):7-15
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bone Density
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Finger Phalanges
Hip Fractures - etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoporotic Fractures - etiology
Predictive value of tests
Risk assessment
Self Report
Abstract
In this prospective study, we investigated the ability of Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX), phalangeal bone mineral density (BMD), and age alone to predict fractures using data from a Danish cohort study, Danish Health Examination Survey 2007-2008, including men (n = 5206) and women (n = 7552) aged 40-90 yr. Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire and by phalangeal BMD measurement. Information on incident and prevalent fractures, rheumatoid arthritis, and secondary osteoporosis was retrieved from the Danish National Patient Registry. Survival analyses were used to examine the association between low, intermediate, and high risk by phalangeal T-score or FRAX and incident fractures, and receiver operating characteristic curves were obtained. Mean follow-up time was 4.3 yr, and a total of 395 persons (3.1%) experienced a fracture during follow-up. The highest rate of major osteoporotic fractures was observed in persons with a high combined risk (FRAX =20% and T-score =-2.5; women: 32.7 and men: 27.6 per 1000 person-yr). This group also had the highest risk of hip fractures (women: 8.1 and men: 7.2 per 1000 person-yr). FRAX and T-score in combination analyzed as continuous variables performed overall best in the prediction of major osteoporotic fractures. In predicting hip fractures, there was a tendency of T-score performing worse than the other methods.
PubMed ID
23623379 View in PubMed
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