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An evaluation of the paediatric acquired brain injury community outreach programme (PABICOP).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166383
Source
Brain Inj. 2006 Oct;20(11):1189-205
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Janette McDougall
Michelle Servais
Joy Sommerfreund
Ellen Rosen
Jane Gillett
Janice Gray
Sara Somers
Pamela Frid
David Dewit
Lisa Pearlman
Frances Hicock
Author Affiliation
Thames Valley Children's Centre, London, Ontario, Canada. janettem@tvcc.on.ca
Source
Brain Inj. 2006 Oct;20(11):1189-205
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attitude to Health
Brain Damage, Chronic - psychology - rehabilitation
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - etiology
Child Health Services - organization & administration
Child, Preschool
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated
Family - psychology
Family Health
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Infant
Male
Ontario
Program Evaluation
Psychometrics
Rehabilitation Centers
Socioeconomic Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To examine the utility of a coordinated, family/community-focused programme (PABICOP) vs. a standard approach for improving outcomes for children with ABI and their families.
Pre-test-post-test design, with comparison group and follow-up.
Ninety-six children (64 children receiving PABICOP services and 32 children receiving standard care) participated in the study. Measures were completed at baseline and 3 and 12 months later.
Parents/caregivers with more than 10 contacts with PABICOP scored significantly higher on an ABI knowledge quiz than either parents/caregivers with 10 contacts or less or the comparison group at post-test and follow-up. Parents/caregivers with 10 contacts or less with PABICOP reported significantly greater improvements in children's school and total competence on the CBCL than either parents/caregivers with more than 10 contacts or the comparison group at post-test and follow-up.
PABICOP may be more useful for enhancing knowledge of ABI for parents/caregivers and for integrating children into the community over a 1-year period than a standard approach. The amount of service received appears to influence outcomes.
PubMed ID
17123936 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of the "Youth en Route" program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166315
Source
Phys Occup Ther Pediatr. 2006;26(4):63-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Jan Evans
Janette McDougall
Patricia Baldwin
Author Affiliation
Thames Valley Children's Centre, London, Ontario, Canada. Jan.Evans@tvcc.on.ca
Source
Phys Occup Ther Pediatr. 2006;26(4):63-87
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Consumer Participation
Continuity of Patient Care
Disabled Children - psychology - rehabilitation
Humans
Ontario
Personal Autonomy
Program Evaluation
Abstract
Youth En Route (YER) is a transition program for youth and young adults with multiple disabilities. It offers a multifaceted approach that includes self-discovery, skill development, and community experience. Underlying the service delivery model is a philosophy of self-determination. This program evaluation measured the self-determination skills, sense of personal control over life choices, and community participation of 34 youth prior to and one year following their involvement with YER. Youth reported statistically and clinically significant improvement from pretest to posttest with respect to both self-determination and sense of personal control. Moreover, youth reported spending significantly more time at posttest than at pretest engaged in volunteer/work activities and community leisure activities. On average, youth reported high satisfaction with YER services. Practical and research implications are discussed.
PubMed ID
17135070 View in PubMed
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Chronic physical health conditions and disability among Canadian school-aged children: a national profile.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182521
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2004 Jan 7;26(1):35-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-7-2004
Author
Janette McDougall
Gillian King
David J de Wit
Linda T Miller
Sungjin Hong
David R Offord
John LaPorta
Katherine Meyer
Author Affiliation
Thames Valley Children's Centre, London, Ontario, Canada. janettem@tvcc.on.ca
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2004 Jan 7;26(1):35-45
Date
Jan-7-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Activities of Daily Living
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Disabled Children - statistics & numerical data
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Education, Special - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Surveys
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Learning Disorders - epidemiology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Prevalence
Sex Factors
Single-Parent Family
Speech Disorders - epidemiology
Abstract
The objective of this study was to provide a national health and disability profile of Canadian school-aged children based on the World Health Organization's definitions of health condition and disability that would facilitate international comparisons of child health data.
Data were used from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth, a 1994 - 95 population-based sample of 22 831 children.
An estimated total of 30.3% of Canadian children aged 6 to 11 had one or more chronic physical health conditions/impairments, while 3.6% had activity-limiting conditions/impairments. Children living with one parent were significantly more likely to have activity-limiting conditions/impairments than those living with two parents. Children with conditions/impairments, particularly those with activity limitations, were significantly more likely than children without health problems to have experienced mental health conditions and learning disabilities, missed school days, received special education, visited health professionals, been hospitalized, and used prescription medication.
Important differences were found among children in a number of areas as a function of overall physical health status. The findings emphasize the importance of measuring activity limitations distinctly from chronic conditions and impairments, and, perhaps, of measuring impairments distinctly from chronic conditions, and of comparing children with such health problems to children without health problems in order to obtain a more accurate picture of the impact of health on children's lives. The World Health Organization's distinct definitions of health condition and disability facilitate a dimensional approach for describing child health that can serve to clarify this field of study and improve comparability of data across countries.
PubMed ID
14660197 View in PubMed
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A framework of operating models for interdisciplinary research programs in clinical service organizations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158303
Source
Eval Program Plann. 2008 May;31(2):160-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Gillian King
Melissa Currie
Linda Smith
Michelle Servais
Janette McDougall
Author Affiliation
Thames Valley Children's Centre, 779 Baseline Road East, London, Ont., Canada. gking27@uwo.ca
Source
Eval Program Plann. 2008 May;31(2):160-73
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Cooperative Behavior
Disabled Children
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Research - organization & administration
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Models, organizational
Ontario
Program Evaluation - methods
Research Design
Abstract
A framework of operating models for interdisciplinary research programs in clinical service organizations is presented, consisting of a "clinician-researcher" skill development model, a program evaluation model, a researcher-led knowledge generation model, and a knowledge conduit model. Together, these models comprise a tailored, collaborative approach to enhancing research-informed practice in community-based clinical service organizations. The models place different degrees of emphasis on the development of research-related skills in practitioners, the generation of knowledge tailored to clinical practice, and knowledge sharing. The nature, philosophical basis, roles of research staff members, outputs and impacts, and strengths and limitations of each model are described, in the context of a long-standing, interdisciplinary research program in a children's rehabilitation service organization. The use of the model framework as a tool for the design of interdisciplinary, community-based research programs is discussed.
PubMed ID
18336906 View in PubMed
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Measuring chronic health condition and disability as distinct concepts in national surveys of school-aged children in Canada: a comprehensive review with recommendations based on the ICD-10 and ICF.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184506
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2003 Aug 19;25(16):922-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-19-2003
Author
Janette McDougall
Linda T Miller
Author Affiliation
Research Program, Thames Valley Children's Centre, London, Ontario, Canada. janettem@tvcc.on.ca
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2003 Aug 19;25(16):922-39
Date
Aug-19-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Chronic Disease
Disabled Children - classification - statistics & numerical data
Environment
Health Surveys
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Abstract
With the aim of improving the measurement of child health and disability in survey research, this paper reviews the coverage of chronic health conditions and the domains of disability and related environmental factors as they are laid out in the ICD-10 and ICF, respectively, in national surveys of school-aged children conducted in Canada since 1980. Recommendations are made for future survey use and construction.
Two reviewers independently examined each of the surveys. Coverage of chronic health conditions, the domains of disability, and environmental factors in survey questions was identified by mapping question content onto ICD-10 and ICF codes. The reviewers then compared their findings and came to a final consensus.
Surveys vary in the range and depth of coverage of the ICD-10 and ICF chapters. Disability surveys and health surveys for persons aged 12 and over contain the most comprehensive lists of chronic conditions. Coverage of impairments is limited. Coverage of activity limitations and participation restrictions is most limited in the domains of personal care and domestic life. Environmental factors not covered include natural environmental changes, attitudes, and policies.
Development of a comprehensive standard list of chronic health conditions based on the ICD-10 and development of standard survey measures of the domains of disability and environmental factors based on the ICF for use in surveys of school-aged children would facilitate an understanding of children's health and disability in the context of the current international health framework provided by the World Health Organization.
PubMed ID
12857580 View in PubMed
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