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Can a focused staff training programme improve the ward atmosphere and patient satisfaction in a forensic psychiatric hospital? A pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152962
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2009 Mar;23(1):117-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Merete Berg Nesset
Jan Ivar Rossberg
Roger Almvik
Svein Friis
Author Affiliation
St. Olav's University Hospital Trondheim, Forensic Department and Research Centre Bröset, Trondheim, Norway. merete.berg.nesset@stolav.no
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2009 Mar;23(1):117-24
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Forensic Psychiatry
Hospitals, Psychiatric - organization & administration
Humans
Inservice training
Male
Middle Aged
Milieu Therapy
Norway
Patient satisfaction
Pilot Projects
Professional-Patient Relations
Questionnaires
Staff Development
Young Adult
Abstract
The main aim of the study was to describe whether staff training and lectures on milieu therapy to nursing staff can change the treatment environment, as perceived by the patients, in a desirable direction. The study was approved by the Regional Ethics Committee for Medical Research.
To measure the patients' perceptions of the treatment environment we used the Ward Atmosphere Scale (WAS). The ward atmosphere was evaluated three times during a 12-month period. Additionally, the patients completed five questions concerning satisfaction with the treatment environment. Between the first and the second ward evaluation the nursing staff was given 3 weeks of lectures on different aspects of milieu therapy. The nursing staff completed the WAS and three satisfaction items.
The study revealed a change in desired direction after education in five of the six key subscales of the WAS (Involvement, Support, Practical orientation, Angry and aggressive behaviour and Order and organization). Staff control was the only subscale with no changes. The patients also reported an increase in satisfaction. The study revealed no major changes in the staff scores. The present study included only a small number of patients and examined the changes in only one psychiatric department; hence it could be argued that the results cannot be generalized to equivalent populations within the forensic services.
The study indicated that it is possible to improve the ward atmosphere in a desirable direction by a 3-week training programme for nursing staff about important aspects of milieu therapy.
PubMed ID
19170956 View in PubMed
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Early Predictors of Ten-Year Course in First-Episode Psychosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279449
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2016 Apr 01;67(4):438-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-01-2016
Author
Svein Friis
Ingrid Melle
Jan Olav Johannessen
Jan Ivar Røssberg
Helene Eidsmo Barder
Julie Horgen Evensen
Ulrik Haahr
Wenche Ten Velden Hegelstad
Inge Joa
Johannes Langeveld
Tor Ketil Larsen
Stein Opjordsmoen
Bjørn Rishovd Rund
Erik Simonsen
Per Wiggen Vaglum
Thomas H McGlashan
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2016 Apr 01;67(4):438-43
Date
Apr-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Progression
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Prognosis
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Remission Induction
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Social Skills
Time Factors
Abstract
Identifying patients at risk of poor outcome at an early stage of illness can aid in treatment planning. This study sought to create a best-fit statistical model of known baseline and early-course risk factors to predict time in psychosis during a ten-year follow-up period after a first psychotic episode.
Between 1997 and 2000, 301 patients with DSM-IV nonorganic, nonaffective first-episode psychosis were recruited consecutively from catchment area-based sectors in Norway and Denmark. Specialized mental health personnel evaluated patients at baseline, three months, and one, two, five, and ten years (N=186 at ten years). Time in psychosis was defined as time with scores =4 on any of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale items P1, P3, P5, P6, and G9. Evaluations were retrospective, based on clinical interviews and all available clinical information. During the first two years, patients were also evaluated by their clinicians at least biweekly. Baseline and early-course predictors of long-term course were identified with linear mixed-model analyses.
Four variables provided significant, additive predictions of longer time in psychosis during the ten-year follow-up: deterioration in premorbid social functioning, duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) of =26 weeks, core schizophrenia spectrum disorder, and no remission within three months.
First-episode psychosis patients should be followed carefully after the start of treatment. If symptoms do not remit within three months with adequate treatment, there is a considerable risk of a poor long-term outcome, particularly for patients with a deterioration in premorbid social functioning, a DUP of at least half a year, and a diagnosis within the core schizophrenia spectrum.
PubMed ID
26567932 View in PubMed
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Long-term follow-up of the TIPS early detection in psychosis study: effects on 10-year outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126256
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 2012 Apr;169(4):374-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Wenche Ten Velden Hegelstad
Tor K Larsen
Bjørn Auestad
Julie Evensen
Ulrik Haahr
Inge Joa
Jan O Johannesen
Johannes Langeveld
Ingrid Melle
Stein Opjordsmoen
Jan Ivar Rossberg
Bjørn Rishovd Rund
Erik Simonsen
Kjetil Sundet
Per Vaglum
Svein Friis
Thomas McGlashan
Author Affiliation
Division of Psychiatry, Stavanger University Hospital, Regional Center for Clinical Research in Psychosis, Health West, Norway. wenchetenvelden@me.com
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 2012 Apr;169(4):374-80
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Early Diagnosis
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Norway
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Prognosis
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis
Abstract
Early detection in first-episode psychosis confers advantages for negative, cognitive, and depressive symptoms after 1, 2, and 5 years, but longitudinal effects are unknown. The authors investigated the differences in symptoms and recovery after 10 years between regional health care sectors with and without a comprehensive program for the early detection of psychosis.
The authors evaluated 281 patients (early detection, N=141) 18 to 65 years old with a first episode of nonaffective psychosis between 1997 and 2001. Of these, 101 patients in the early-detection area and 73 patients in the usual-detection area were followed up at 10 years, and the authors compared their symptoms and recovery.
A significantly higher percentage of early-detection patients had recovered at the 10-year follow-up relative to usual-detection patients. This held true despite more severely ill patients dropping out of the study in the usual-detection area. Except for higher levels of excitative symptoms in the early-detection area, there were no symptom differences between the groups. Early-detection recovery rates were higher largely because of higher employment rates for patients in this group.
Early detection of first-episode psychosis appears to increase the chances of milder deficits and superior functioning. The mechanisms by which this strategy improves the long-term prognosis of psychosis remain speculative. Nevertheless, our findings over 10 years may indicate that a prognostic link exists between the timing of intervention and outcome that deserves additional study.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Psychiatry. 2012 Sep;169(9):992; author reply 992-322952080
Comment In: Am J Psychiatry. 2012 Apr;169(4):345-722476671
PubMed ID
22407080 View in PubMed
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Patients' and family members' experiences of a psychoeducational family intervention after a first episode psychosis: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261652
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2014 Jan;35(1):58-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Liv Nilsen
Jan C Frich
Svein Friis
Jan Ivar Røssberg
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2014 Jan;35(1):58-68
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Caregivers - education - psychology
Cohort Studies
Consumer Behavior
Family Therapy - methods
Female
Home Nursing - education - psychology
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient satisfaction
Psychotherapy, Group - methods
Psychotic Disorders - nursing - psychology
Qualitative Research
Schizophrenia - nursing
Schizophrenic Psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective of this study is to explore patients' and family members' experiences of the different elements of a psychoeducational family intervention. A qualitative, explorative study was performed based on digitally recorded in-depth interviews with 12 patients and 14 family members. The interview data were transcribed in a slightly modified verbatim mode and analysed using systematic text condensation. Six themes that both patients and family members experienced as important in the family intervention were identified: alliance, support, anxiety and tension, knowledge and learning, time, and structure. A good relationship between the group leaders and participants was essential in preventing dropout. Meeting with other people in the same situation reduced feelings of shame and increased hope for the future. Hearing real life stories was experienced as being more important for gaining new knowledge about psychosis than lectures and workshops. However, many patients experienced anxiety and tension during the meetings. The group format could be demanding for patients immediately after a psychotic episode and for those still struggling with distressing psychotic symptoms. Group leaders need to recognise patients' levels of anxiety before, and during, the intervention, and consider the different needs of patients and family members in regards to when the intervention starts, the group format, and the patients' level of psychotic symptoms. The findings in the present study may help to tailor family work to better meet the needs of both patients and family members.
PubMed ID
24350752 View in PubMed
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Perceived discrimination is associated with severity of positive and depression/anxiety symptoms in immigrants with psychosis: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134715
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2011;11:77
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Akiah O Berg
Ingrid Melle
Jan Ivar Rossberg
Kristin Lie Romm
Sara Larsson
Trine V Lagerberg
Ole A Andreassen
Edvard Hauff
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. a.o.berg@medisin.uio.no
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2011;11:77
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anxiety - complications - diagnosis - ethnology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - complications - diagnosis - ethnology - psychology
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - ethnology
Prejudice
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Psychotic Disorders - complications - diagnosis - ethnology - psychology
Self Report
Social Perception
Abstract
Immigration status is a significant risk factor for psychotic disorders, and a number of studies have reported more severe positive and affective symptoms among immigrant and ethnic minority groups. We investigated if perceived discrimination was associated with the severity of these symptoms among immigrants in Norway with psychotic disorders.
Cross-sectional analyses of 90 immigrant patients (66% first-generation, 68% from Asia/Africa) in treatment for psychotic disorders were assessed for DSM-IV diagnoses with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM Disorders (SCID-I, sections A-E) and for present symptom severity by The Structured Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (SCI-PANSS). Perceived discrimination was assessed by a self-report questionnaire developed for the Immigrant Youth in Cultural Transition Study.
Perceived discrimination correlated with positive psychotic (r=0.264, p
Notes
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PubMed ID
21548949 View in PubMed
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Severe social anxiety in early psychosis is associated with poor premorbid functioning, depression, and reduced quality of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132402
Source
Compr Psychiatry. 2012 Jul;53(5):434-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Kristin Lie Romm
Ingrid Melle
Christian Thoresen
Ole A Andreassen
Jan Ivar Rossberg
Author Affiliation
Psychosis Research Unit, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, 0407 Oslo, Norway. k.l.romm@medisin.uio.no
Source
Compr Psychiatry. 2012 Jul;53(5):434-40
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Quality of Life
Schizophrenia - epidemiology
Schizophrenic Psychology
Self Concept
Abstract
The main aim of the present study was to examine whether patients with first-episode psychosis (FEP) with severe social anxiety show poorer premorbid and current functioning, higher level of current clinical symptoms, and better "insight into illness." Furthermore, we wanted to explore whether social anxiety is associated with reduced quality of life (QoL).
A sample of 144 individuals with an FEP was divided into 3 groups depending on current level of social anxiety symptoms measured by the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale. Analysis of variance was performed including measures of demographic and clinical characteristics. A hierarchical regression analysis was performed to explore possible predictors of QoL.
The most severe social anxiety group revealed poorer premorbid adjustment, lower social functioning, and higher levels of depression. Furthermore, this group revealed a higher awareness of illness and experienced reduced QoL. Overall, social anxiety was associated with reduced QoL even after adjusting for psychotic symptoms and depression.
Severe social anxiety in FEP is associated with poor premorbid functioning and distinct clinical characteristics, besides being a possible predictor of QoL.
PubMed ID
21821242 View in PubMed
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Suicidality in first episode psychosis is associated with insight and negative beliefs about psychosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141734
Source
Schizophr Res. 2010 Nov;123(2-3):257-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Elizabeth A Barrett
Kjetil Sundet
Ann Faerden
Ingrid Agartz
Unni Bratlien
Kristin Lie Romm
Erlend Mork
Jan Ivar Rossberg
Nils Eiel Steen
Ole A Andreassen
Ingrid Melle
Author Affiliation
Department of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, 0424 Oslo, Norway. e.a.barrett@medisin.uio.no
Source
Schizophr Res. 2010 Nov;123(2-3):257-62
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Affect
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - epidemiology
Schizophrenic Psychology
Self Concept
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Suicidal ideation
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Suicidal behaviour is prevalent in psychotic disorders. Insight has been found to be associated with increased risk for suicidal behaviour, but not consistently. A possible explanation for this is that insight has different consequences for patients depending on their beliefs about psychosis. The present study investigated whether a relationship between insight, negative beliefs about psychosis and suicidality was mediated by depressive symptoms, and if negative beliefs about psychosis moderated the relationship between insight and suicidality in patients with a first episode of psychosis (FEP).
One hundred ninety-four FEP-patients were assessed with a clinical interview for diagnosis, symptoms, functioning, substance use, suicidality, insight, and beliefs about psychosis.
Nearly 46% of the patients were currently suicidal. Depressive symptoms, having a schizophrenia spectrum disorder, insight, and beliefs about negative outcomes for psychosis were independently associated with current suicidality; contradicting a mediating effect of depressive symptoms. Negative beliefs about psychosis did not moderate the effect of insight on current suicidality.
The results indicate that more depressive symptoms, higher insight, and negative beliefs about psychosis increase the risk for suicidality in FEP-patients. The findings imply that monitoring insight should be part of assessing the suicide risk in patients with FEP, and that treating depression and counteracting negative beliefs about psychosis may possibly reduce the risk for suicidality.
PubMed ID
20685083 View in PubMed
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Treatment and violent behavior in persons with first episode psychosis during a 10-year prospective follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259887
Source
Schizophr Res. 2014 Jul;156(2-3):272-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Johannes Langeveld
Stål Bjørkly
Bjørn Auestad
Helene Barder
Julie Evensen
Wenche Ten Velden Hegelstad
Inge Joa
Jan Olav Johannessen
Tor Ketil Larsen
Ingrid Melle
Stein Opjordsmoen
Jan Ivar Røssberg
Bjørn Rishovd Rund
Erik Simonsen
Per Vaglum
Thomas McGlashan
Svein Friis
Source
Schizophr Res. 2014 Jul;156(2-3):272-6
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Crime
Denmark - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotherapy
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Risk
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Violence
Young Adult
Abstract
First episode psychosis (FEP) patients have an increased risk for violence and criminal activity prior to initial treatment. However, little is known about the prevalence of criminality and acts of violence many years after implementation of treatment for a first episode psychosis.
To assess the prevalence of criminal and violent behaviors during a 10-year follow-up period after the debut of a first psychosis episode, and to identify early predictors and concomitant risk factors of violent behavior.
A prospective design was used with comprehensive assessments of criminal behavior, drug abuse, clinical, social and treatment variables at baseline, five, and 10-year follow-up. Additionally, threatening and violent behavior was assessed at 10-year follow-up. A clinical epidemiological sample of first-episode psychosis patients (n=178) was studied.
During the 10-year follow-up period, 20% of subjects had been apprehended or incarcerated. At 10-year follow-up, 15% of subjects had exposed others to threats or violence during the year before assessment. Illegal drug use at baseline and five-year follow-up, and a longer duration of psychotic symptoms were found to be predictive of violent behavior during the year preceding the 10-year follow-up.
After treatment initiation, the overall prevalence of violence in psychotic patients drops gradually to rates close to those of the general population. However, persistent illicit drug abuse is a serious risk factor for violent behavior, even long after the start of treatment. Achieving remission early and reducing substance abuse may contribute to a lower long-term risk for violent behavior in FEP patients.
PubMed ID
24837683 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.