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A 5-Year Continued Follow-up of Cancer Risk and All-Cause Mortality Among Norwegian Military Peacekeepers Deployed to Kosovo During 1999-2016.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311620
Source
Mil Med. 2020 02 12; 185(1-2):e239-e243
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-12-2020
Author
Leif Aage Strand
Jan Ivar Martinsen
Einar Kristian Borud
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Armed Forces Joint Medical Services, Institute of Military Medicine and Epidemiology, Sessvollmoen Garnison, N-2018 Sessvollmoen, Norway.
Source
Mil Med. 2020 02 12; 185(1-2):e239-e243
Date
02-12-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Kosovo
Male
Military Personnel
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Risk
Abstract
In 2012, Norwegian news media reported on cases of brain cancer among Norwegian peacekeeping troops who served in Kosovo, allegedly caused by exposure to depleted uranium fired during airstrikes before the peacekeepers arrived in 1999. A first study followed 6076 military men and women with peacekeeping service in Kosovo during 1999-2011 for cancers and deaths throughout 2011. The study did not support to the idea that peacekeeping service in Kosovo could lead to increased risk of brain cancer or other cancers. However, the average time of follow-up (10.6 years) was rather short for cancer development; therefore the aim of the present study was to evaluate cancer risk and general mortality in an updated cohort after 5 years of additional follow-up.
The updated cohort consisted of 6,159 peacekeepers (5,884 men and 275 women) who served in Kosovo during 1999-2016 and were followed for cancer incidence and mortality from all causes combined throughout 2016. We calculated standardized incidence ratios (SIR) for cancer and standardized mortality ratios (SMR) from national population rates. Poisson regression was used to assess the effect of length of service (
PubMed ID
31322664 View in PubMed
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Asbestos-related cancers among 28,300 military servicemen in the Royal Norwegian Navy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98734
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2010 Jan;53(1):64-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Leif Aage Strand
Jan Ivar Martinsen
Vilhelm F Koefoed
Jan Sommerfelt-Pettersen
Tom Kristian Grimsrud
Author Affiliation
Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway. leif.age.strand@kreftregisteret.no
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2010 Jan;53(1):64-71
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asbestos - adverse effects
Asbestosis - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Incidence
Laryngeal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Lung Neoplasms - pathology
Male
Mesothelioma - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Military Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Naval Medicine - statistics & numerical data
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Norway
Pharyngeal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Pleural Neoplasms - epidemiology
Risk factors
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: This study focus on the incidence of asbestos-related cancers among 28,300 officers and enlisted servicemen in the Royal Norwegian Navy. Until 1987, asbestos aboard the vessels potentially caused exposure to 11,500 crew members. METHODS: Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) were calculated for malignant mesothelioma, lung cancer, and laryngeal, pharyngeal, stomach, and colorectal cancers according to service aboard between 1950 and 1987 and in other Navy personnel. RESULTS: Increased risk of mesothelioma was seen among engine room crews, with SIRs of 6.23 (95% CI = 2.51-12.8) and 6.49 (95% CI = 2.11-15.1) for personnel who served less than 2 years and those with longer service, respectively. Lung cancer was nearly 20% higher than expected among both engine crews and non-engine crews. An excess of colorectal cancer bordering on statistical significance was seen among non-engine crews (SIR = 1.14; 95% CI = 0.98-1.32). Land-based personnel and personnel who served aboard after 1987 had lower lung cancer incidence than expected (SIR = 0.77; 95% CI = 0.64-0.92). No elevated risk of laryngeal, pharyngeal, or stomach cancers was seen. CONCLUSION: The overall increase (65%) in mesotheliomas among military Navy servicemen was confined to marine engine crews only. The mesothelioma incidence can be taken as an indicator of the presence or absence of asbestos exposure, but it offered no consistent explanation to the variation in incidence of other asbestos-related cancers.
PubMed ID
19921706 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence among firefighters: 45 years of follow-up in five Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105024
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2014 Jun;71(6):398-404
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Eero Pukkala
Jan Ivar Martinsen
Elisabete Weiderpass
Kristina Kjaerheim
Elsebeth Lynge
Laufey Tryggvadottir
Pär Sparén
Paul A Demers
Author Affiliation
Finnish Cancer Registry, Institute for Statistical and Epidemiological Cancer Research, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2014 Jun;71(6):398-404
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - etiology
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Carcinogens
Cohort Studies
Firefighters
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Multiple Myeloma - epidemiology - etiology
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Risk
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Testicular Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Firefighters are potentially exposed to a wide range of known and suspected carcinogens through their work. The objectives of this study were to examine the patterns of cancer among Nordic firefighters, and to compare them with the results from previous studies.
Data for this study were drawn from a linkage between the census data for 15 million people from the five Nordic countries and their cancer registries for the period 1961-2005. SIR analyses were conducted with the cancer incidence rates for the entire national study populations used as reference rates.
A total of 16 422 male firefighters were included in the final cohort. A moderate excess risk was seen for all cancer sites combined, (SIR=1.06, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.11). There were statistically significant excesses in the age category of 30-49 years in prostate cancer (SIR=2.59, 95% CI 1.34 to 4.52) and skin melanoma (SIR=1.62, 95% CI 1.14 to 2.23), while there was almost no excess in the older ages. By contrast, an increased risk, mainly in ages of 70 years and higher, was observed for non-melanoma skin cancer (SIR=1.40, 95% CI 1.10 to 1.76), multiple myeloma (SIR=1.69, 95% CI 1.08 to 2.51), adenocarcinoma of the lung (SIR=1.90, 95% CI 1.34 to 2.62), and mesothelioma (SIR=2.59, 95% CI 1.24 to 4.77). By contrast with earlier studies, the incidence of testicular cancer was decreased (SIR=0.51, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.98).
Some of these associations have been observed previously, and potential exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, asbestos and shift work involving disruption of circadian rhythms may partly explain these results.
Notes
Comment In: Occup Environ Med. 2014 Aug;71(8):525-624996680
PubMed ID
24510539 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence among male Norwegian asphalt workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18719
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2003 Jan;43(1):88-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Britt Grethe Randem
Sverre Langård
Inge Dale
Johny Kongerud
Jan Ivar Martinsen
Aage Andersen
Author Affiliation
Rikshospitalet University Hospital, Centre for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Oslo, Norway. britt.randem@rikshospitalet.no
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2003 Jan;43(1):88-95
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Humans
Hydrocarbons
Incidence
Inhalation Exposure
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The main objective of the present study was to investigate whether exposure to bitumen fumes could enhance the risk of cancer in asphalt workers. METHODS: A historical prospective cohort study was performed including 8,763 male asphalt workers from all main asphalt companies in Norway. Name, date of birth, and unique personal identification number, address, job type, and start and stop of employment in specific jobs was obtained for the workers. Information was complied from payroll and personnel records in the companies. The cohort was then linked to the Cancer Registry of Norway, which has complete records of individual cases of cancer in the Norwegian population since 1953. Follow-up was from 1 January 1970 to 31 December 1997. The 5-year age and period adjusted general male population in Norway served as reference population. RESULTS: Lung cancer was found elevated with standardized incidence ratio (SIR) = 1.3 (95% confidence intervals (CI) = 1.1, 1.7) in the overall analysis. Lung cancer was found more elevated in workers first exposed in the 1950s and 1960s and in mastic asphalt workers (SIR = 4.2, 95% CI = 1.2, 10, based on four cases) and pavers (SIR = 1.4, 95% CI = 1.0, 1.9). There was a deficiency in the incidence of malignant melanoma with 13 cases versus 26 expected. CONCLUSIONS: Risk of lung cancer was found enhanced among the asphalt workers. Some of the enhanced risk could probably be explained by the smoking habits of the workers. Exposure to coal tar may also have contributed to the enhanced risk.
PubMed ID
12494425 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence among members of the Norwegian trade union of insulation workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17975
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2004 Jan;46(1):84-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Bente Ulvestad
Kristina Kjaerheim
Jan Ivar Martinsen
Gunnar Mowe
Aage Andersen
Author Affiliation
Cancer Registry of Norway, Montebello, Oslo, Norway.
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2004 Jan;46(1):84-9
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asbestos - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Humans
Incidence
Labor Unions
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Mesothelioma - epidemiology - etiology
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Insulation work has been described as an occupation with high exposure to asbestos. A cohort of members of the Norwegian Trade Union of Insulation Workers (n = 1116), hired between 1930 and 1975, was established. During 2002, the cohort was linked to the Cancer Registry of Norway. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of pleural mesothelioma was 12.9 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 6.0-24.6). Two cases with peritoneal mesotheliomas were found (SIR, 14.8; 95% CI = 1.8-53.4). The SIR of lung cancer was 3.0 (95% CI = 2.3-3.8). Four cases of lung cancer were observed among cork workers without any exposure to asbestos, but to cork dust and tar smoke (SIR, 5.3; 95% CI = 1.5-13.6). Our study showed a high risk of mesothelioma and an elevated risk of lung cancer among members of the Trade Union of Insulation Workers.
PubMed ID
14724482 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence among priests: 45 years of follow-up in four Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128477
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2012 Feb;27(2):101-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Andreas Stang
Jan Ivar Martinsen
Kristina Kjaerheim
Elisabete Weiderpass
Pär Sparén
Laufey Tryggvadóttir
Eero Pukkala
Author Affiliation
Medizinische Fakultät, Institut für Klinische Epidemiologie, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Halle, Germany. andreas.stang@medizin.uni-halle.de
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2012 Feb;27(2):101-8
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - classification - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Religion
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Previously published studies on the risk of cancer among male priests have been based on cancer mortality with the exception of one case-control study. The aim of this study was to present estimates of cancer incidence among Nordic male priests. The study cohort for our analyses consisted of 6.5 million men aged 30-64 years old who had participated in any computerised population census in four Nordic countries in 1990 or earlier. Follow-up was done by drawing linkages with the national population and cancer registries. 13,491 priests were identified by their job title codes. We estimated the standardised incidence ratio (SIR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for the priests using the male population as a reference. Priests had a lower cancer incidence than the general population (overall SIR 0.85, 95% CI: 0.82-0.88). The majority of smoking- and alcohol-related cancers were associated with decreased SIR estimates. Increased risks were observed for skin melanoma (SIR 1.34, 95% CI: 1.11-1.62), acute myeloid leukemia (SIR 1.75, 95% CI: 1.20-2.47) and thyroid cancer (SIR 1.86, 95% CI: 1.22-2.73). This is the first cohort study regarding the incidence of cancer among priests. The lower incidence of smoking and alcohol-related cancers among Nordic male priests can be explained by their lower exposure to cigarettes and alcohol when compared to the general population. A greater risk of melanoma is typical of highly-educated people, but it is unclear why priests should have an increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia or thyroid cancer.
PubMed ID
22200870 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence among short- and long-term workers in the Norwegian silicon carbide industry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98678
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2010 Jan;36(1):71-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Merete Drevvatne Bugge
Helge Kjuus
Jan Ivar Martinsen
Kristina Kjaerheim
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Occupational Health, N-0033 Oslo, Norway. mdb@stami.no
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2010 Jan;36(1):71-9
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Carbon Compounds, Inorganic - adverse effects
Dust
Extraction and Processing Industry
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Norway
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Silicon Compounds - adverse effects
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: A previous study among workers in the Norwegian silicon carbide industry, followed until 1996, revealed an excess incidence of lung and total cancer. The present study adds nine years of follow-up and focuses on cancer risk among short- and long-term workers, based on the assumption that these two groups have different exposure and lifestyle characteristics. METHODS: The total cohort for this study comprised 2612 men employed for >6 months between 1913 and 2003. The follow-up period for cancer was 1953-2005. Short-term workers were defined as having
PubMed ID
19953212 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence among Swedish firefighters: an extended follow-up of the NOCCA study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309233
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2020 02; 93(2):197-204
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
02-2020
Author
Carolina Bigert
Jan Ivar Martinsen
Per Gustavsson
Pär Sparén
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Solnavägen 4, 10th Floor, 113 65, Stockholm, Sweden. carolina.bigert@ki.se.
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2020 02; 93(2):197-204
Date
02-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Firefighters
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Risk factors
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To evaluate cancer incidence among Swedish firefighters and analyze risk in relation to work duration as a proxy for cumulative exposure.
This cohort study is based on the Swedish component of the Nordic Occupational Cancer (NOCCA) project. The cohort includes six million people who participated in one or more of the population censuses in 1960, 1970, 1980 and 1990. The census data were linked to the Swedish Cancer Registry for the 1961-2009 period, extending a previous NOCCA follow-up time by 4 years. We identified 8136 male firefighters. SIRs were calculated using cancer incidence rates in the national population as a reference.
We found a statistically significant excess of non-melanoma skin cancer (SIR?=?1.48, 95% CI 1.20-1.80) but no positive relationship between risk and work duration. There was a small, yet statistically significant increased risk of prostate cancer among firefighters with service times of 30 years or more. The first follow-up period (1961-1975) showed an increased risk of stomach cancer relative to the reference group, while the last period (1991-2009) showed an increased risk of non-melanoma skin cancer. There was no excess risk for all cancer sites combined (SIR?=?1.03, 95% CI 0.97-1.09).
Our results do not support an overall risk of cancer among Swedish firefighters, but a possible risk of non-melanoma skin cancer exists. The previously noted excess of prostate cancer among Swedish firefighters in NOCCA was no longer statistically significant in this extended follow-up but was present among those with the longest service times.
PubMed ID
31463517 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence among workers in the asbestos-cement producing industry in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18673
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2002 Dec;28(6):411-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Bente Ulvestad
Kristina Kjaerheim
Jan Ivar Martinsen
Grete Damberg
Axel Wannag
Gunnar Mowe
Aage Andersen
Author Affiliation
Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Population-based Cancer Research, Montebello, Oslo, Norway. bente.ulvestad@kreftregisteret.no
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2002 Dec;28(6):411-7
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Asbestos - adverse effects - classification
Asbestos, Amphibole - adverse effects
Asbestos, Crocidolite - adverse effects
Asbestos, Serpentine - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Industry
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Mesothelioma - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - classification - epidemiology - etiology
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Poisson Distribution
Registries
Risk factors
Time
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The incidence of cancer among employees of a Norwegian asbestos-cement factory was studied in relation to duration of exposure and time since first exposure. The factory was active in 1942-1968. Most of the asbestos in use was chrysotile, but for technical reasons 8% amphiboles was added. METHODS: For the identification of cancer cases, a cohort of 541 male workers was linked to the Cancer Registry of Norway. The analysis was based on the comparison between the observed and expected number of cancer cases. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated. Period of first employment, duration of employment, and time since first employment were used as indicators of exposure. Poisson regression analysis was used for the internal comparisons. RESULTS: The standardized incidence ratio was 52.5 (95% CI 31.1-83.0) for pleural mesothelioma, on the basis of 18 cases. The highest standardized incidence ratio was found for workers first employed in the earliest production period (SIR 99.0, 95% CI 51.3-173). No peritoneal mesothelioma was found. The standardized incidence ratio for lung cancer was 3.1 (95% CI 2.14.3), but no dose-response effect was observed. The ratio of mesothelioma to lung cancer cases was 1:2. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed a high incidence of mesothelioma and a high ratio of mesothelioma to lung cancer among asbestos-cement workers. The high incidence of mesothelioma was probably due to the fact that a relatively high proportion of amphiboles was used in the production process.
PubMed ID
12539801 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence and all-cause mortality among civilian men and women employed by the Royal Norwegian Navy between 1950 and 2005.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301604
Source
Cancer Epidemiol. 2018 12; 57:1-6
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2018
Author
Leif Aage Strand
Jan Ivar Martinsen
Inger Rudvin
Elin Anita Fadum
Einar Kristian Borud
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Armed Forces Joint Medical Services, N-2058, Sessvollmoen, Norway; Cancer Registry of Norway, Box 5313, N-0304, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: laastrand@forsvaretshelseregister.no.
Source
Cancer Epidemiol. 2018 12; 57:1-6
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Abstract
We aimed to investigate cancer incidence and all-cause mortality in a cohort of 8358 civilians (5134 men and 3224 women) employed by the Royal Norwegian Navy at any time between 1950 and 2005.
The cohort was followed for cancer incidence and all-cause mortality from 1960 through 2015. Standardised incidence ratios (SIR) and mortality ratios (SMR) were calculated from national rates. Separate SIRs were calculated for a subgroup of male workshop workers and another of female cleaners.
Overall cancer incidence among men was similar to the reference rate; male breast cancer was more frequent (SIR?=?3.23). Male workshop workers showed a SIR of 1.77 for stomach cancer, while their incidence of lympho-haematopoietic cancers was half that of the reference rates. Women had increased risks of overall cancer (SIR?=?1.11), lung cancer (SIR?=?1.35), and ovarian cancer (SIR?=?1.39). Female cleaners showed a SIR of 2.33 for bladder cancer and a lowered incidence of brain cancer (SIR?=?0.18). In the overall cohort, all-cause mortality was lower than expected for men (SMR?=?0.92) and closer to the reference rate for women (SMR?=?0.95).
In men, we observed a lowered all-cause mortality and an excess of stomach cancer in workshop workers. In women, increased risks of overall cancer, lung cancer and ovarian cancer was seen. An increased risk of bladder cancer and a lowered incidence of brain cancer was observed among female cleaners.
PubMed ID
30205311 View in PubMed
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35 records – page 1 of 4.