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The association between vaccination confidence, vaccination behavior, and willingness to recommend vaccines among Finnish healthcare workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308406
Source
PLoS One. 2019; 14(10):e0224330
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2019
Author
Linda Cecilia Karlsson
Stephan Lewandowsky
Jan Antfolk
Paula Salo
Mikael Lindfelt
Tuula Oksanen
Mika Kivimäki
Anna Soveri
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland.
Source
PLoS One. 2019; 14(10):e0224330
Date
2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Decision Making
Female
Finland
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Personnel - psychology
Humans
Influenza Vaccines - immunology
Influenza, Human - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Trust
Vaccination - psychology
Abstract
Information and assurance from healthcare workers (HCWs) is reported by laypeople as a key factor in their decision to get vaccinated. However, previous research has shown that, as in the general population, hesitancy towards vaccines exists among HCWs as well. Previous studies further suggest that HCWs with a higher confidence in vaccinations and vaccine providers are more willing to take the vaccines themselves and to recommend vaccines to patients. In the present study with 2962 Finnish HCWs (doctors, head nurses, nurses, and practical nurses), we explored the associations between HCWs' vaccination confidence (perceived benefit and safety of vaccines and trust in health professionals), their decisions to accept vaccines for themselves and their children, and their willingness to recommend vaccines to patients. The results showed that although the majority of HCWs had high confidence in vaccinations, a notable share reported low vaccination confidence. Moreover, in line with previous research, HCWs with higher confidence in the benefits and safety of vaccines were more likely to accept vaccines for their children and themselves, and to recommend vaccines to their patients. Trust in other health professionals was not directly related to vaccination or recommendation behavior. Confidence in the benefits and safety of vaccines was highest among doctors, and increased along with the educational level of the HCWs, suggesting a link between confidence and the degree of medical training. Ensuring high confidence in vaccines among HCWs may be important in maintaining high vaccine uptake in the general population.
PubMed ID
31671115 View in PubMed
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Ethnic and gender discrimination in the private rental housing market in Finland: A field experiment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286507
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(8):e0183344
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Annamaria Öblom
Jan Antfolk
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(8):e0183344
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ethnic Groups
Female
Finland
Housing - statistics & numerical data - supply & distribution
Humans
Male
Racism - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sexism - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Ethnic and gender discrimination in a variety of markets has been documented in several populations. We conducted an online field experiment to examine ethnic and gender discrimination in the private rental housing market in Finland. We sent 1459 inquiries regarding 800 apartments. We compared responses to standardized apartment inquiries including fictive Arabic-sounding, Finnish-sounding or Swedish-sounding female or male names. We found evidence of discrimination against Arabic-sounding names and male names. Inquiries including Arabic-sounding male names had the lowest probability of receiving a response, receiving a response to about 16% of the inquiries made, while Finnish-sounding female names received a response to 42% of the inquires. We did not find any evidence of the landlord's gender being associated with the discrimination pattern. The findings suggest that both ethnic and gender discrimination occur in the private rental housing market in Finland.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28854277 View in PubMed
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Experiences of severe childhood maltreatment, depression, anxiety and alcohol abuse among adults in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285661
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(5):e0177252
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Wail Rehan
Jan Antfolk
Ada Johansson
Patrick Jern
Pekka Santtila
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(5):e0177252
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - epidemiology - etiology
Anxiety - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child Abuse
Depression - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Abstract
Childhood maltreatment increases the risk of subsequent depression, anxiety and alcohol abuse, but the rate of resilient victims is unknown. Here, we investigated the rate of victims that do not suffer from clinical levels of these problems after severe maltreatment in a population-based sample of 10980 adult participants. Compared to men, women reported more severe emotional and sexual abuse, as well as more severe emotional neglect. For both genders, severe emotional abuse (OR = 3.80 [2.22, 6.52]); severe physical abuse (OR = 3.97 [1.72, 9.16]); severe emotional neglect (OR = 3.36 [1.73, 6.54]); and severe physical neglect (OR = 11.90 [2.66, 53.22]) were associated with depression and anxiety while only severe physical abuse (OR = 3.40 [1.28, 9.03]) was associated with alcohol abuse. Looking at men and women separately, severe emotional abuse (OR = 6.05 [1.62, 22.60] in men; OR = 3.74 [2.06, 6.81] in women) and severe physical abuse (OR = 6.05 [1.62, 22.60] in men; OR = 3.03 [0.99, 9.33] in women) were associated with clinical levels of depression and anxiety. In addition, in women, severe sexual abuse (OR = 2.40 [1.10, 5.21]), emotional neglect (OR = 4.78 [2.40, 9.56]), and severe physical neglect (OR = 9.86 [1.99, 48.93]) were associated with clinical levels of depression and anxiety. Severe emotional abuse in men (OR = 3.86 [0.96, 15.48]) and severe physical abuse in women (OR = 5.18 [1.48, 18.12]) were associated with alcohol abuse. Concerning resilience, the majority of severely maltreated participants did not report clinically significant levels of depression or anxiety (72%), or alcohol abuse (93%) in adulthood. Although the majority of severely abused or neglected individuals did not show clinical levels of depression, anxiety or alcohol use, severe childhood maltreatment increased the risk for showing clinical levels of psychopathology in adulthood.
Notes
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Erratum In: PLoS One. 2017 Jun 22;12 (6):e018031628640921
PubMed ID
28481912 View in PubMed
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Men's sexual interest in children: one-year incidence and correlates in a population-based sample of Finnish male twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271019
Source
J Child Sex Abus. 2015;24(2):115-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Pekka Santtila
Jan Antfolk
Anna Räfså
Maria Hartwig
Heikki Sariola
N Kenneth Sandnabba
Andreas Mokros
Source
J Child Sex Abus. 2015;24(2):115-34
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Age Factors
Child
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder, Major - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Incidence
Libido
Male
Pedophilia - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Population Surveillance
Statistics as Topic
Transvestism - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Abstract
In a study of 1,310 Finnish adult male twins we found that sexual interest in children aged 12 or younger was reported by 0.2% of the sample. Sexual interest in children aged 15 or younger was reported by 3.3%. Participants reporting sexual interest in children aged 15 or younger were younger, reported stronger sexual desire, and had experienced more childhood sexual and nonsexual abuse. The present study is the first to give a population-based estimate of the incidence of sexual interest in children among adult men. The 12-month incidence of sexual interest in children below the age of 16 years is roughly comparable to the one-year incidence of major depression or the lifetime prevalence of transvestitic fetishism.
PubMed ID
25747416 View in PubMed
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Trait reactance and trust in doctors as predictors of vaccination behavior, vaccine attitudes, and use of complementary and alternative medicine in parents of young children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305194
Source
PLoS One. 2020; 15(7):e0236527
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2020
Author
Anna Soveri
Linda C Karlsson
Otto Mäki
Jan Antfolk
Otto Waris
Hasse Karlsson
Linnea Karlsson
Mikael Lindfelt
Stephan Lewandowsky
Author Affiliation
FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
Source
PLoS One. 2020; 15(7):e0236527
Date
2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Complementary Therapies
Female
Finland
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Influenza Vaccines - immunology
Influenza, Human - prevention & control
Internet
Male
Parents - psychology
Physician-Patient Relations
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vaccination - psychology
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to investigate whether anti-vaccination attitudes and behavior, and positive attitudes to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), are driven by trait reactance and a distrust in medical doctors.
The sample consisted of 770 Finnish parents who filled out an online survey. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to examine if trait reactance plays a role in vaccination decisions, vaccine attitudes, and in the use of CAM, and whether that relationship is mediated by trust in medical doctors.
Parents with higher trait reactance had lower trust in doctors, more negative attitudes to vaccines, a higher likelihood of not accepting vaccines for their children and themselves, and a higher likelihood to use CAM treatments that are not included in evidence-based medicine. Our analyses also revealed associations between vaccination behavior and CAM use and vaccine attitudes and CAM use, but there was no support for the previous notion that these associations would be explained by trait reactance and trust in doctors.
Taken together, higher trait reactance seems to be relevant for attitudes and behaviors that go against conventional medicine, because trait reactance is connected to a distrust in medical doctors. Our findings also suggest that high trait reactance and low trust in doctors function differently for different people: For some individuals they might be associated with anti-vaccination attitudes and behavior, while for others they might be related to CAM use. We speculate that this is because people differ in what is important to them, leading them to react against different aspects of conventional medicine.
PubMed ID
32716918 View in PubMed
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Unwillingness to engage in behaviors that protect against COVID-19: the role of conspiracy beliefs, trust, and endorsement of complementary and alternative medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311507
Source
BMC Public Health. 2021 04 08; 21(1):684
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-08-2021
Author
Anna Soveri
Linda C Karlsson
Jan Antfolk
Mikael Lindfelt
Stephan Lewandowsky
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. anjoso@utu.fi.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2021 04 08; 21(1):684
Date
04-08-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
COVID-19 - epidemiology - prevention & control
COVID-19 Vaccines - administration & dosage
Complementary Therapies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Trust
Vaccination - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
We investigated if people's response to the official recommendations during the COVID-19 pandemic is associated with conspiracy beliefs related to COVID-19, a distrust in the sources providing information on COVID-19, and an endorsement of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM).
The sample consisted of 1325 Finnish adults who filled out an online survey marketed on Facebook. Structural regression analysis was used to investigate whether: 1) conspiracy beliefs, a distrust in information sources, and endorsement of CAM predict people's response to the non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) implemented by the government during the COVID-19 pandemic, and 2) conspiracy beliefs, a distrust in information sources, and endorsement of CAM are related to people's willingness to take a COVID-19 vaccine.
Individuals with more conspiracy beliefs and a lower trust in information sources were less likely to have a positive response to the NPIs. Individuals with less trust in information sources and more endorsement of CAM were more unwilling to take a COVID-19 vaccine. Distrust in information sources was the strongest and most consistent predictor in all models. Our analyses also revealed that some of the people who respond negatively to the NPIs also have a lower likelihood to take the vaccine. This association was partly related to a lower trust in information sources.
Distrusting the establishment to provide accurate information, believing in conspiracy theories, and endorsing treatments and substances that are not part of conventional medicine, are all associated with a more negative response to the official guidelines during COVID-19. How people respond to the guidelines, however, is more strongly and consistently related to the degree of trust they feel in the information sources, than to their tendency to hold conspiracy beliefs or endorse CAM. These findings highlight the need for governments and health authorities to create communication strategies that build public trust.
PubMed ID
33832446 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.