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Association between inflammatory potential of diet and mortality among women in the Swedish Mammography Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281612
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2016 Aug;55(5):1891-900
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Nitin Shivappa
Holly Harris
Alicja Wolk
James R Hebert
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2016 Aug;55(5):1891-900
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Diet - adverse effects
Energy intake
Exercise
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Inflammation - mortality
Mammography
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality
Nutrition Assessment
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Diet and dietary components have been studied previously in relation to mortality; however, little is known about the relationship between the inflammatory potential of overall diet and mortality.
We examined the association between the Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII) and mortality among 33,747 participants in the population-based Swedish Mammography Cohort. The DII score was calculated based on dietary information obtained from a self-administered food frequency questionnaire. Mortality was determined through linkage to the Swedish Cause of Death Registry through 2013. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR). During 15 years of follow-up, 7095 deaths were identified, including 1996 due to cancer, 602 of which were due to digestive-tract cancer, and 2399 due to cardiovascular disease.
After adjusting for age, energy intake, education, alcohol intake, physical activity, BMI, and smoking status, analyses revealed a positive association between higher DII score and all-cause mortality. When used as a continuous variable (range -4.19 to 5.10), DII score was associated with all-cause mortality (HRContinuous = 1.05; 95 % CI 1.01-1.09) and digestive-tract cancer mortality (HRContinuous = 1.15; 95 % CI 1.02-1.29). Comparing subjects in the highest quintile of DII (=1.91) versus the lowest quintile (DII = -0.67), a significant association was observed for all-cause mortality (HR = 1.25; 95 % CI 1.07-1.47, P trend = 0.003).
These results indicate that a pro-inflammatory diet, as indicated by higher DII score, was associated with all-cause and digestive-tract cancer mortality.
PubMed ID
26227485 View in PubMed
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