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The characteristics and experience of community food program users in arctic Canada: a case study from Iqaluit, Nunavut.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123211
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:464
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
James Ford
Marie-Pierre Lardeau
Will Vanderbilt
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. james.ford@mcgill.ca
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:464
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Educational Status
Family Characteristics
Female
Food Assistance - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Nunavut - epidemiology
Nutrition Policy
Seasons
Socioeconomic Factors
Unemployment - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Community food programs (CFPs), including soup kitchens and food banks, are a recent development in larger settlements in the Canadian Arctic. Our understanding of utilization of these programs is limited as food systems research has not studied the marginalised and transient populations using CFPs, constraining service planning for some of the most vulnerable community members. This paper reports on a baseline study conducted with users of CFPs in Iqaluit, Nunavut, to identify and characterize utilization and document their food security experience.
Open ended interviews and a fixed-choice survey on a census (n?=?94) were conducted with of users of the food bank, soup kitchen, and friendship centre over a 1?month period, along with key informant interviews.
Users of CFPs are more likely to be Inuit, be unemployed, and have not completed high school compared to the general Iqaluit population, while also reporting high dependence on social assistance, low household income, and an absence of hunters in the household. The majority report using CFPs for over a year and on a regular basis.
The inability of users to obtain sufficient food must be understood in the context of socio-economic transformations that have affected Inuit society over the last half century as former semi-nomadic hunting groups were resettled into permanent settlements. The resulting livelihood changes profoundly affected how food is produced, processed, distributed, and consumed, and the socio-cultural relationships surrounding such activities. Consequences have included the rising importance of material resources for food access, the weakening of social safety mechanisms through which more vulnerable community members would have traditionally been supported, and acculturative stress. Addressing these broader challenges is essential for food policy, yet CFPs also have an essential role in providing for those who would otherwise have limited food access.
Notes
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 1996 Feb;96(2):155-628557942
Cites: J Nutr. 2011 Sep;141(9):1746-5321753059
Cites: Arctic Med Res. 1996;55 Suppl 1:13-98871681
Cites: J Nutr. 1997 Nov;127(11):2179-869349845
Cites: J Nutr. 1999 Feb;129(2S Suppl):517S-520S10064321
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2005 Jul-Aug;96 Suppl 3:S32-6, S36-4116042162
Cites: J Nutr. 2006 May;136(5):1438S-1448S16614441
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Sep;65(4):331-4017131971
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2001 Apr;60(2):112-2211507960
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2003 Jan;42(1):57-6512500077
Cites: J Nutr. 2004 Jun;134(6):1447-5315173410
Cites: Risk Anal. 2004 Aug;24(4):1007-1815357824
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Dec;65(5):403-1517319085
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2007 Feb;66(1):71-617451136
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2008 Mar-Apr;99(2):95-718457280
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2008 Jun;67(2-3):179-8918767338
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2008 Nov;67(9):1423-3318676079
Cites: Health Place. 2009 Jun;15(2):403-1118760954
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2009 Oct;69(8):1194-20319700231
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Dec;68(5):471-8720044965
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2010 Mar;103(5):749-5919840421
Cites: CMAJ. 2010 Feb 23;182(3):243-820100848
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2010 Apr;69(2):151-720356466
Cites: J Nutr. 2010 Jul;140(7):1311-620444949
Cites: Rural Remote Health. 2010 Apr-Jun;10(2):136520568906
Cites: Rural Remote Health. 2010 Apr-Jun;10(2):137020568912
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2010 May-Jun;101(3):196-20120737808
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2010 Oct 15;408(22):5165-23420728918
Cites: J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:5-1721158957
Cites: J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:27-3421158959
Cites: J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:51-821158962
Cites: J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:110-421158969
Cites: J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:120-721158971
Cites: Geogr J. 2011;177(1):44-6121560272
Cites: Ecohealth. 2010 Sep;7(3):361-7320680394
Cites: Proc Nutr Soc. 2011 May;70(2):232-5121284909
Cites: Rural Remote Health. 2011;11(2):168021702639
Cites: Annu Rev Nutr. 1996;16:417-428839933
PubMed ID
22720722 View in PubMed
Less detail

Climate-sensitive health priorities in Nunatsiavut, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264176
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15(1):605
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sherilee L Harper
Victoria L Edge
James Ford
Ashlee Cunsolo Willox
Michele Wood
Scott A McEwen
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15(1):605
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
This exploratory study used participatory methods to identify, characterize, and rank climate-sensitive health priorities in Nunatsiavut, Labrador, Canada.
A mixed method study design was used and involved collecting both qualitative and quantitative data at regional, community, and individual levels. In-depth interviews with regional health representatives were conducted throughout Nunatsiavut (n?=?11). In addition, three PhotoVoice workshops were held with Rigolet community members (n?=?11), where participants took photos of areas, items, or concepts that expressed how climate change is impacting their health. The workshop groups shared their photographs, discussed the stories and messages behind them, and then grouped photos into re-occurring themes. Two community surveys were administered in Rigolet to capture data on observed climatic and environmental changes in the area, and perceived impacts on health, wellbeing, and lifestyles (n?=?187).
Climate-sensitive health pathways were described in terms of inter-relationships between environmental and social determinants of Inuit health. The climate-sensitive health priorities for the region included food security, water security, mental health and wellbeing, new hazards and safety concerns, and health services and delivery.
The results highlight several climate-sensitive health priorities that are specific to the Nunatsiavut region, and suggest approaching health research and adaptation planning from an EcoHealth perspective.
PubMed ID
26135309 View in PubMed
Less detail

Founder and recurrent CDH1 mutations in families with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163216
Source
JAMA. 2007 Jun 6;297(21):2360-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-6-2007
Author
Pardeep Kaurah
Andrée MacMillan
Niki Boyd
Janine Senz
Alessandro De Luca
Nicki Chun
Gianpaolo Suriano
Sonya Zaor
Lori Van Manen
Cathy Gilpin
Sarah Nikkel
Mary Connolly-Wilson
Scott Weissman
Wendy S Rubinstein
Courtney Sebold
Robert Greenstein
Jennifer Stroop
Dwight Yim
Benoit Panzini
Wendy McKinnon
Marc Greenblatt
Debrah Wirtzfeld
Daniel Fontaine
Daniel Coit
Sam Yoon
Daniel Chung
Gregory Lauwers
Antonio Pizzuti
Carlos Vaccaro
Maria Ana Redal
Carla Oliveira
Marc Tischkowitz
Sylviane Olschwang
Steven Gallinger
Henry Lynch
Jane Green
James Ford
Paul Pharoah
Bridget Fernandez
David Huntsman
Author Affiliation
Hereditary Cancer Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
JAMA. 2007 Jun 6;297(21):2360-72
Date
Jun-6-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age of Onset
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cadherins - genetics
DNA Mutational Analysis
Female
Founder Effect
Genetic Counseling
Germ-Line Mutation
Haplotypes
Heterozygote
Heterozygote Detection
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation
Newfoundland and Labrador - epidemiology
Pedigree
Penetrance
Stomach Neoplasms - genetics - mortality
Abstract
Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer is caused by germline mutations in the epithelial cadherin (CDH1) gene and is characterized by an increased risk for diffuse gastric cancer and lobular breast cancer.
To determine whether recurring germline CDH1 mutations occurred due to independent mutational events or common ancestry.
Thirty-eight families diagnosed clinically with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer were accrued between November 2004 and January 2006 and were analyzed for CDH1 mutations as part of an ongoing study at the British Columbia Cancer Agency. Twenty-six families had at least 2 gastric cancer cases with 1 case of diffuse gastric cancer in a person younger than 50 years; 12 families had either a single case of diffuse gastric cancer diagnosed in a person younger than 35 years or multiple cases of diffuse gastric cancer diagnosed in persons older than 50 years.
Classification of family members as carriers or noncarriers of CDH1 mutations. Haplotype analysis to assess recurring mutations for common ancestry was performed on 7 families from this study and 7 previously reported families with the same mutations.
Thirteen mutations (6 novel) were identified in 15 of the 38 families (40% detection rate). The 1137G>A splicing mutation and the 1901C>T (A634V) missense/splicing mutation occurred on common haplotypes in 2 families but on different haplotypes in a third family. The 2195G>A (R732Q) missense/splicing mutation occurred in 2 families on different haplotypes. The 2064-2065delTG mutation occurred on a common haplotype in 2 families. Two families from this study plus 2 additional families carrying the novel 2398delC mutation shared a common haplotype, suggesting a founder effect. All 4 families originate from the southeast coast of Newfoundland. Due to concentrations of lobular breast cancer cases, 2 branches of this family had been diagnosed as having hereditary breast cancer and were tested for BRCA mutations. Within these 4 families, the cumulative risk by age 75 years in mutation carriers for clinically detected gastric cancer was 40% (95% confidence interval [CI], 12%-91%) for males and 63% (95% CI, 19%-99%) for females and the risk for breast cancer in female mutation carriers was 52% (95% CI, 29%-94%).
Recurrent CDH1 mutations in families with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer are due to both independent mutational events and common ancestry. The presence of a founder mutation from Newfoundland is strongly supported.
Notes
Comment In: JAMA. 2007 Jun 6;297(21):2410-117545691
Comment In: Gastroenterology. 2007 Nov;133(5):1730-2; discussion 1732-317983818
PubMed ID
17545690 View in PubMed
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Healthcare use for acute gastrointestinal illness in two Inuit communities: Rigolet and Iqaluit, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263115
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:26290
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Sherilee L Harper
Victoria L Edge
James Ford
M Kate Thomas
David Pearl
Jamal Shirley
Scott A McEwen
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:26290
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The incidence of self-reported acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) in Rigolet, Nunatsiavut, and Iqaluit, Nunavut, is higher than reported elsewhere in Canada; as such, understanding AGI-related healthcare use is important for healthcare provision, public health practice and surveillance of AGI.
This study described symptoms, severity and duration of self-reported AGI in the general population and examined the incidence and factors associated with healthcare utilization for AGI in these 2 Inuit communities.
Cross-sectional survey data were analysed using multivariable exact logistic regression to examine factors associated with individuals' self-reported healthcare and over-the-counter (OTC) medication utilization related to AGI symptoms.
In Rigolet, few AGI cases used healthcare services [4.8% (95% CI=1.5-14.4%)]; in Iqaluit, some cases used healthcare services [16.9% (95% CI=11.2-24.7%)]. Missing traditional activities due to AGI (OR=3.8; 95% CI=1.18-12.4) and taking OTC medication for AGI symptoms (OR=3.8; 95% CI=1.2-15.1) were associated with increased odds of using healthcare services in Iqaluit. In both communities, AGI severity and secondary symptoms (extreme tiredness, headache, muscle pains, chills) were significantly associated with increased odds of taking OTC medication.
While rates of self-reported AGI were higher in Inuit communities compared to non-Inuit communities in Canada, there were lower rates of AGI-related healthcare use in Inuit communities compared to other regions in Canada. As such, the rates of healthcare use for a given disease can differ between Inuit and non-Inuit communities, and caution should be exercised in making comparisons between Inuit and non-Inuit health outcomes based solely on clinic records and healthcare use.
PubMed ID
26001982 View in PubMed
Less detail

The hidden costs: Identification of indirect costs associated with acute gastrointestinal illness in an Inuit community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294164
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(5):e0196990
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Nia King
Rachael Vriezen
Victoria L Edge
James Ford
Michele Wood
Sherilee Harper
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(5):e0196990
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology - ethnology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cost Allocation
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - economics - epidemiology - therapy
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
National Health Programs - economics
Abstract
Acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) incidence and per-capita healthcare expenditures are higher in some Inuit communities as compared to elsewhere in Canada. Consequently, there is a demand for strategies that will reduce the individual-level costs of AGI; this will require a comprehensive understanding of the economic costs of AGI. However, given Inuit communities' unique cultural, economic, and geographic contexts, there is a knowledge gap regarding the context-specific indirect costs of AGI borne by Inuit community members. This study aimed to identify the major indirect costs of AGI, and explore factors associated with these indirect costs, in the Inuit community of Rigolet, Canada, in order to develop a case-based context-specific study framework that can be used to evaluate these costs.
A mixed methods study design and community-based methods were used. Qualitative in-depth, group, and case interviews were analyzed using thematic analysis to identify and describe indirect costs of AGI specific to Rigolet. Data from two quantitative cross-sectional retrospective surveys were analyzed using univariable regression models to examine potential associations between predictor variables and the indirect costs.
The most notable indirect costs of AGI that should be incorporated into cost-of-illness evaluations were the tangible costs related to missing paid employment and subsistence activities, as well as the intangible costs associated with missing community and cultural events. Seasonal cost variations should also be considered. This study was intended to inform cost-of-illness studies conducted in Rigolet and other similar research settings. These results contribute to a better understanding of the economic impacts of AGI on Rigolet residents, which could be used to help identify priority areas and resource allocation for public health policies and programs.
Notes
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2003 Sep;62(3):228-41 PMID 14594198
Cites: Risk Anal. 2010 May;30(5):782-97 PMID 19765248
Cites: J Food Prot. 2015 Jun;78(6):1064-71 PMID 26038894
Cites: J Food Prot. 2006 Mar;69(3):651-9 PMID 16541699
Cites: Geogr J. 2011;177(1):44-61 PMID 21560272
Cites: Ecohealth. 2011 Mar;8(1):93-108 PMID 21785890
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2016 Jan;144(2):241-6 PMID 26095130
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2005 Mar-Apr;96 Suppl 2:S45-61 PMID 16078555
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2004 Apr;132(2):211-21 PMID 15061495
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2009 Oct;69(8):1194-203 PMID 19700231
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2011 Jan;72(2):185-92 PMID 21146909
Cites: J Food Prot. 2012 Jul;75(7):1292-302 PMID 22980013
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Jul 4;374(9683):76-85 PMID 19577696
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Dec;68(5):471-87 PMID 20044965
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2007 Jul 18;7:162 PMID 17640371
Cites: Lancet. 2005 Jul 2-8;366(9479):10-3 PMID 15993213
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 2002;23:115-34 PMID 11910057
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2008 Apr;136(4):451-60 PMID 17565767
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2005 Jul;15(6):832-40 PMID 15961879
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2006 Dec 19;6:307 PMID 17178001
Cites: J Occup Environ Med. 2003 Dec;45(12):1257-66 PMID 14665811
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2005 Jul-Aug;96 Suppl 3:S32-6, S36-41 PMID 16042162
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Dec;65(5):416-31 PMID 17319086
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2012 Aug;75(3):538-47 PMID 22595069
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2007 Nov;135(8):1290-8 PMID 17313694
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015 May 21;74:26290 PMID 26001982
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2007 May 1;195 Suppl 1:S36-S44 PMID 17539193
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1996 Aug;43(3):281-90 PMID 8844931
Cites: Health Rep. 2005 May;16(3):47-51 PMID 15971515
Cites: Int J Food Microbiol. 2008 Sep 30;127(1-2):43-52 PMID 18649966
Cites: Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2013 Mar;38(3):300-5 PMID 23537022
Cites: Aust J Rural Health. 1997 May;5(2):59-63 PMID 9444122
Cites: CMAJ. 2011 Feb 8;183(2):209-14 PMID 21041430
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Feb;64(1):38-45 PMID 15776991
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Jul 4;374(9683):65-75 PMID 19577695
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2015 Feb;126:86-98 PMID 25528558
Cites: Ecohealth. 2012 Mar;9(1):89-101 PMID 22526749
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2015 Jul 02;15:605 PMID 26135309
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2000 Dec;125(3):505-22 PMID 11218201
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2015 Sep;141:133-41 PMID 26275362
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2014 May 26;14:509 PMID 24885154
Cites: J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2003 Mar;18(3):322-8 PMID 12603534
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2015 Oct;143(14):3048-63 PMID 25697261
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 1996 Feb;96(2):155-62 PMID 8557942
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 1998 Aug;28(2):345-52 PMID 9725732
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2017 Jun 15;17 (1):578 PMID 28619039
Cites: Nurse Res. 2006 Jul 1;13(4):84 PMID 27702218
Cites: Malar J. 2011 Feb 08;10:32 PMID 21303538
PubMed ID
29768456 View in PubMed
Less detail

The hidden costs: Identification of indirect costs associated with acute gastrointestinal illness in an Inuit community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291798
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(5):e0196990
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2018
Author
Nia King
Rachael Vriezen
Victoria L Edge
James Ford
Michele Wood
Sherilee Harper
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(5):e0196990
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) incidence and per-capita healthcare expenditures are higher in some Inuit communities as compared to elsewhere in Canada. Consequently, there is a demand for strategies that will reduce the individual-level costs of AGI; this will require a comprehensive understanding of the economic costs of AGI. However, given Inuit communities' unique cultural, economic, and geographic contexts, there is a knowledge gap regarding the context-specific indirect costs of AGI borne by Inuit community members. This study aimed to identify the major indirect costs of AGI, and explore factors associated with these indirect costs, in the Inuit community of Rigolet, Canada, in order to develop a case-based context-specific study framework that can be used to evaluate these costs.
A mixed methods study design and community-based methods were used. Qualitative in-depth, group, and case interviews were analyzed using thematic analysis to identify and describe indirect costs of AGI specific to Rigolet. Data from two quantitative cross-sectional retrospective surveys were analyzed using univariable regression models to examine potential associations between predictor variables and the indirect costs.
The most notable indirect costs of AGI that should be incorporated into cost-of-illness evaluations were the tangible costs related to missing paid employment and subsistence activities, as well as the intangible costs associated with missing community and cultural events. Seasonal cost variations should also be considered. This study was intended to inform cost-of-illness studies conducted in Rigolet and other similar research settings. These results contribute to a better understanding of the economic impacts of AGI on Rigolet residents, which could be used to help identify priority areas and resource allocation for public health policies and programs.
Notes
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2003 Sep;62(3):228-41 PMID 14594198
Cites: Risk Anal. 2010 May;30(5):782-97 PMID 19765248
Cites: J Food Prot. 2015 Jun;78(6):1064-71 PMID 26038894
Cites: J Food Prot. 2006 Mar;69(3):651-9 PMID 16541699
Cites: Geogr J. 2011;177(1):44-61 PMID 21560272
Cites: Ecohealth. 2011 Mar;8(1):93-108 PMID 21785890
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2016 Jan;144(2):241-6 PMID 26095130
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2005 Mar-Apr;96 Suppl 2:S45-61 PMID 16078555
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2004 Apr;132(2):211-21 PMID 15061495
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2009 Oct;69(8):1194-203 PMID 19700231
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2011 Jan;72(2):185-92 PMID 21146909
Cites: J Food Prot. 2012 Jul;75(7):1292-302 PMID 22980013
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Jul 4;374(9683):76-85 PMID 19577696
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Dec;68(5):471-87 PMID 20044965
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2007 Jul 18;7:162 PMID 17640371
Cites: Lancet. 2005 Jul 2-8;366(9479):10-3 PMID 15993213
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 2002;23:115-34 PMID 11910057
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2008 Apr;136(4):451-60 PMID 17565767
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2005 Jul;15(6):832-40 PMID 15961879
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2006 Dec 19;6:307 PMID 17178001
Cites: J Occup Environ Med. 2003 Dec;45(12):1257-66 PMID 14665811
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2005 Jul-Aug;96 Suppl 3:S32-6, S36-41 PMID 16042162
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Dec;65(5):416-31 PMID 17319086
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2012 Aug;75(3):538-47 PMID 22595069
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2007 Nov;135(8):1290-8 PMID 17313694
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015 May 21;74:26290 PMID 26001982
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2007 May 1;195 Suppl 1:S36-S44 PMID 17539193
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1996 Aug;43(3):281-90 PMID 8844931
Cites: Health Rep. 2005 May;16(3):47-51 PMID 15971515
Cites: Int J Food Microbiol. 2008 Sep 30;127(1-2):43-52 PMID 18649966
Cites: Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2013 Mar;38(3):300-5 PMID 23537022
Cites: Aust J Rural Health. 1997 May;5(2):59-63 PMID 9444122
Cites: CMAJ. 2011 Feb 8;183(2):209-14 PMID 21041430
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Feb;64(1):38-45 PMID 15776991
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Jul 4;374(9683):65-75 PMID 19577695
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2015 Feb;126:86-98 PMID 25528558
Cites: Ecohealth. 2012 Mar;9(1):89-101 PMID 22526749
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2015 Jul 02;15:605 PMID 26135309
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2000 Dec;125(3):505-22 PMID 11218201
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2015 Sep;141:133-41 PMID 26275362
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2014 May 26;14:509 PMID 24885154
Cites: J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2003 Mar;18(3):322-8 PMID 12603534
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2015 Oct;143(14):3048-63 PMID 25697261
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 1996 Feb;96(2):155-62 PMID 8557942
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 1998 Aug;28(2):345-52 PMID 9725732
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2017 Jun 15;17 (1):578 PMID 28619039
Cites: Nurse Res. 2006 Jul 1;13(4):84 PMID 27702218
Cites: Malar J. 2011 Feb 08;10:32 PMID 21303538
PubMed ID
29768456 View in PubMed
Less detail

How does the media portray drinking water security in Indigenous communities in Canada? An analysis of Canadian newspaper coverage from 2000-2015.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281076
Source
BMC Public Health. 2017 Mar 27;17(1):282
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-27-2017
Author
Steven Lam
Ashlee Cunsolo
Alexandra Sawatzky
James Ford
Sherilee L Harper
Source
BMC Public Health. 2017 Mar 27;17(1):282
Date
Mar-27-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Drinking water insecurity and related health outcomes often disproportionately impact Indigenous communities internationally. Understanding media coverage of these water-related issues can provide insight into the ways in which public perceptions are shaped, with potential implications for decision-making and action. This study aimed to examine the extent, range, and nature of newspaper coverage of drinking water security in Canadian Indigenous communities.
Using ProQuest database, we systematically searched for and screened newspaper articles published from 2000 to 2015 from Canadian newspapers: Windspeaker, Toronto Star, The Globe and Mail, and National Post. We conducted descriptive quantitative analysis and thematic qualitative analysis on relevant articles to characterize framing and trends in coverage.
A total of 1382 articles were returned in the search, of which 256 articles were identified as relevant. There was limited coverage of water challenges for Canadian Indigenous communities, especially for Métis (5%) and Inuit (3%) communities. Most stories focused on government responses to water-related issues, and less often covered preventative measures such as source water protection. Overall, Indigenous peoples were quoted the most often. Double-standards of water quality between Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities, along with conflict and cooperation efforts between stakeholders were emphasized in many articles.
Limited media coverage could undermine public and stakeholder interest in addressing water-related issues faced by many Canadian Indigenous communities.
PubMed ID
28347284 View in PubMed
Less detail

Lived experience of acute gastrointestinal illness in Rigolet, Nunatsiavut: "Just suffer through it"

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258513
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2014 Dec 8;126C:86-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-8-2014
Author
Sherilee L Harper
Victoria L Edge
James Ford
M Kate Thomas
Scott A McEwen
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2014 Dec 8;126C:86-98
Date
Dec-8-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Enteric illness associated with foodborne and waterborne disease is thought to be common in some Canadian Indigenous communities. This study aimed to understand the lived experience of acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI), including symptoms and severity, perceived causes, and healthcare seeking behaviors of AGI in the small Inuit community of Rigolet, Canada. A concurrent mixed quantitative and qualitative methods design was used. Two cross-sectional retrospective surveys provided quantitative data to examine self-reported AGI symptoms and the distribution of potential risk factors in the community. Qualitative data from in-depth interviews with one-third of AGI cases were analyzed using a constant-comparative method to describe symptoms and severity, identify perceived risk factors, and explore health seeking behavior of AGI in Rigolet. Of the survey respondents reporting AGI, most reported symptoms of diarrhea without vomiting, followed by diarrhea with vomiting, and vomiting without diarrhea. The most common secondary symptoms included stomach cramps and abdominal pain, nausea, and extreme tiredness. Community members identified potential risk factors for AGI that reflect the epidemiology triad (host, agent, and environmental factors), including hygiene, retail food, tap water, boil water advisories, and personal stress. Risk aversion and healthcare seeking behaviors reflected the core constructs of the Health Belief Model (perceived susceptibility, severity, and benefits and barriers to action). Understanding community experience, perspectives, and beliefs related to AGI is useful for public health practitioners and health care providers. This information is important especially considering the relatively high estimated burden of AGI and the relatively low healthcare seeking behaviors in some Indigenous communities compared to national estimates. Moreover, the mixed-methods approach used to understand the burden of AGI could be extended to other health research in Indigenous contexts.
PubMed ID
25528558 View in PubMed
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Promoting Inuit health through a participatory whiteboard video.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299525
Source
Can J Public Health. 2019 Apr 25; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-25-2019
Author
Manpreet Saini
Steven Roche
Andrew Papadopoulos
Nicole Markwick
Inez Shiwak
Charlie Flowers
Michele Wood
Victoria L Edge
James Ford
Carlee Wright
Sherilee L Harper
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road East, Guelph, ON, N1G 2W1, Canada. sainim3@gmail.com.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2019 Apr 25; :
Date
Apr-25-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The Inuit community of Rigolet experiences greater rates of self-reported acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) compared to southern Canada.
A whiteboard video tool was collaboratively developed by Rigolet youth, community members, the research team and key regional stakeholders to share public health recommendations for reducing the risk of AGI. The video debuted in Rigolet at a community event in August 2016 and was later provided online for community members and local and regional health departments. Interviews and focus group discussions were used to evaluate the ability of the video to communicate public health information to community members in Rigolet.
Community and government viewers reported that the whiteboard video was novel and engaging. Evaluation participants believed the video was suitable for promoting Inuit health because of the use of locally relevant visuals and narrative, which reflect Inuit art and storytelling traditions. Furthermore, participants indicated that the video co-development process was critical to ensuring community relevance of the video. Short-term outcome results suggest the video can reinforce health knowledge and potentially encourage behavioural change.
The results suggest this whiteboard video was an effective tool to share information and could increase intention to change behaviours to reduce the risk of AGI in Rigolet. While tools like the whiteboard video are gaining popularity, the participatory approach was used to develop the video, and its use in an Inuit context illustrates its innovation and novelty. This tool may be a useful health promotion tool among Indigenous communities in Canada.
PubMed ID
31025298 View in PubMed
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Seasonal prevalence and determinants of food insecurity in Iqaluit, Nunavut.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265325
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:27284
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Yang Guo
Lea Berrang-Ford
James Ford
Marie-Pierre Lardeau
Victoria Edge
Kaitlin Patterson
Sherilee L Harper
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:27284
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Food insecurity is an ongoing problem in the Canadian Arctic. Although most studies have focused on smaller communities, little is known about food insecurity in larger centres.
This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of food insecurity during 2 different seasons in Iqaluit, the territorial capital of Nunavut, as well as identify associated risk factors.
A modified United States Department of Agriculture Food Security Survey was applied to 532 randomly selected households in September 2012 and 523 in May 2013. Chi-square tests and multivariable logistic regression were used to examine potential associations between food security and 9 risk factors identified in the literature.
In September 2012, 28.7% of surveyed households in Iqaluit were food insecure, a rate 3 times higher than the national average, but lower than smaller Inuit communities in Nunavut. Prevalence of food insecurity in September 2012 was not significantly different in May 2013 (27.2%). When aggregating results from Inuit households from both seasons (May and September), food insecurity was associated with poor quality housing and reliance on income support (p
PubMed ID
26248959 View in PubMed
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