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[Abdominal aortic aneurysm and the risk of stroke and myocardial infarction].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114769
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2013 Mar 18;175(12):799
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-18-2013

Femoral vein repair of arterial infections: technical tips to reduce procedure time.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263445
Source
Vasc Endovascular Surg. 2014 Jul-Aug;48(5-6):367-71
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jacob Budtz-Lilly
Nikolaj Eldrup
Sten Vammen
Jesper Laustsen
Source
Vasc Endovascular Surg. 2014 Jul-Aug;48(5-6):367-71
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anastomosis, Surgical
Arteries - microbiology - physiopathology - surgery
Blood Vessel Prosthesis - adverse effects
Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation - adverse effects - instrumentation - mortality
Denmark
Device Removal
Female
Femoral Vein - physiopathology - transplantation
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Operative Time
Patient care team
Prosthesis-Related Infections - diagnosis - microbiology - mortality - surgery
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Vascular Grafting - adverse effects - methods - mortality
Vascular Patency
Abstract
Success with the neoaortoiliac system (NAIS) bypass has previously been reported. Drawbacks to this procedure include prolonged operative times and significant morbidity. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a 2-team approach in addition to a consistent anastomosis technique reduces the operative time of the NAIS procedure.
A single-center retrospective review was performed for operations using femoral vein in arterial reconstruction from 2003 to 2012.
A total of 40 patients, 25 men and 15 women, were included for analysis. Median operative time for all operations was 300 minutes (interquartile range). Thirty-day mortality was 7.5% (n = 3). Assisted primary patency at 1 year was 100%.
A 2-surgical team approach can reduce the operative time by up to 50%. This improves the attractiveness of this procedure, particularly when recalling that the treatment is definitive by virtue of its eradication of the source of infection.
PubMed ID
24923287 View in PubMed
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Frequency of cancer in patients operated on for acute peripheral arterial thrombosis and the impact on prognosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272493
Source
J Vasc Surg. 2015 Dec;62(6):1598-606
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Chalotte Winther Nicolajsen
Maja Holch Dickenson
Jacob Budtz-Lilly
Nikolaj Eldrup
Source
J Vasc Surg. 2015 Dec;62(6):1598-606
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amputation - statistics & numerical data
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Gastrointestinal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Hematologic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Humans
Ischemia - epidemiology - surgery
Leg - blood supply
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Peripheral Arterial Disease - epidemiology - surgery
Prognosis
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Stroke - epidemiology
Survival Analysis
Thrombosis - epidemiology - surgery
Abstract
Little is known about acute peripheral arterial thrombosis in patients with concomitant cancer. Small studies suggest that revascularization in this patient group is associated with thrombosis and increased risk of amputation and death. We investigated the frequency of cancer in patients operated on for acute peripheral arterial thrombosis and the long-term risk of amputation, mortality, myocardial infarction, and stroke in a national cohort.
This was a prospective case/noncase study comprising all Danish citizens undergoing vascular surgery for acute arterial thrombosis from 1986 to 2012 with up to 26 years of follow-up.
A total of 7840 patients were treated surgically for acute arterial thrombosis; 2384 (30.4%) were previously diagnosed with cancer or developed cancer during the observation period. Risk of amputation was not significantly different in patients with or without cancer, except in patients with cancer diagnosed
PubMed ID
26384760 View in PubMed
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Long-term incidence of myocardial infarct, stroke, and mortality in patients operated on for abdominal aortic aneurysms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129916
Source
J Vasc Surg. 2012 Feb;55(2):311-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Nikolaj Eldrup
Jacob Budtz-Lilly
Jesper Laustsen
Bo Martin Bibby
William P Paaske
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery T, Aarhus University Hospital Skejby, Aarhus, Denmark. eldrup@ki.au.dk
Source
J Vasc Surg. 2012 Feb;55(2):311-7
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - mortality - surgery
Aspirin - therapeutic use
Chi-Square Distribution
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Fibrinolytic Agents - therapeutic use
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Incidence
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Myocardial Infarction - etiology - mortality - prevention & control
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Stroke - etiology - mortality - prevention & control
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Vascular Surgical Procedures - adverse effects - mortality
Abstract
The risks of myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke after abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) resection are not known. Prophylaxis with aspirin and statins is not generally recommended, although patients with AAAs have an increased prevalence of cardiovascular atherosclerosis. We report the incidences of MI, stroke, and death in an unselected national cohort of patients operated on for AAAs, with the general population as the control group.
In a matched cohort study, 11,094 Danish patients who underwent acute or elective open AAA repair from January 1986 through June 2009 were compared with four randomly chosen age- and sex-matched individuals (controls) from the general population (n = 44,364). Data were collected retrospectively from the Danish Vascular Registry (Karbase), the National Population Registry, and the National Inpatient Registry. The groups were analyzed for the incidences of MI, stroke, and death, with up to 20 years of follow-up.
AAA patients had an annual MI incidence of 2.5% (hazard ratio, 2.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.9-2.2) compared with the general population. The annual incidence of stroke was 2.9% (hazard ratio, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.6-1.9), and there was a 2.4-fold (95% CI, 2.3-2.4) increase in the hazard of all-cause mortality compared with the general population.
AAA patients of both sexes have a high risk of atherosclerotic events (MI, stroke) and death, so lifelong prophylaxis must be considered from our epidemiologic data. Randomized trials investigating the potential benefit of aspirin and statin therapy in AAA patients are needed.
Notes
Comment In: J Vasc Surg. 2012 Sep;56(3):897-8; author reply 898-922917053
PubMed ID
22051869 View in PubMed
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