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Alcohol consumption and risk of colorectal cancer in a cohort of Finnish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212483
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1996 Mar;7(2):214-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
S A Glynn
D. Albanes
P. Pietinen
C C Brown
M. Rautalahti
J A Tangrea
P R Taylor
J. Virtamo
Author Affiliation
Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1996 Mar;7(2):214-23
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Antineoplastic Agents - administration & dosage
Carotenoids - administration & dosage
Cohort Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Time Factors
beta Carotene
Abstract
We investigated the association between self-reported alcohol ingestion and colorectal cancer in a cohort of male smokers in Finland. Among 27,109 men aged 50 to 69 years, 87 colon and 53 rectal cases were diagnosed during the five to eight years of follow-up. Among drinkers, colorectal cancer risk increased with the amount of alcohol consumed (P trend = 0.01) with risk increasing by 17 percent for each drink consumed. Both beer and spirits contributed to this increased risk. Further analyses revealed that the positive association with alcohol was primarily for colon cancer (P trend = 0.01). Interestingly, risk of colorectal cancer associated with drinking (cf self-reported abstinence) changed with follow-up time, suggesting an inverse association for alcohol early in follow-up, and a positive association after about three-and-a-half years of follow-up. Follow-up time did not modify the positive association with amount of alcohol among drinkers, however. Results also indicated that beta-carotene supplementation may attenuate the effect of alcohol on colorectal cancer risk among drinkers. In conclusion, this study supports a role for alcohol in colon carcinogenesis and suggests that similar studies should evaluate carefully the effects of lifetime drinking habits and recent abstinence.
PubMed ID
8740734 View in PubMed
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Association between alcohol and lung cancer in the alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene cancer prevention study in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201116
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1999 Jun;10(3):219-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
K. Woodson
D. Albanes
J A Tangrea
M. Rautalahti
J. Virtamo
P R Taylor
Author Affiliation
Cancer Prevention Studies Branch, Division of Clinical Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892-7058, USA.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1999 Jun;10(3):219-26
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Risk assessment
Smoking - adverse effects
Vitamin E - therapeutic use
beta Carotene - therapeutic use
Abstract
We evaluated the association between alcohol intake and lung cancer in a trial-based cohort in Finland, the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study (ATBC Study).
During an average of 7.7 years of follow-up, 1059 lung cancer cases were diagnosed among the 27,111 male smokers with complete alcohol and dietary information. The relationship between alcohol and lung cancer was assessed in multivariate Cox regression models that adjusted for age, smoking, body mass index and intervention group.
Nondrinkers, 11% of the study population, were at increased lung cancer risk compared to drinkers (RR = 1.2, 95% CI: 1.0-1.4), possibly due to the inclusion of ex-drinkers who had stopped drinking for health reasons. Among drinkers only, we observed no association between lung cancer and total ethanol or specific beverage (beer, wine, spirits) intake. We found no significant effect modification by level of smoking, dietary micronutrients or trial intervention group; however, for men in the highest quartile of alcohol intake, we observed a slight increase in risk for lighter smokers (30 cigarettes/day).
We concluded that alcohol consumption was not a risk factor for lung cancer among male cigarette smokers, and its effect was not significantly modified by other factors, notably smoking history.
PubMed ID
10454067 View in PubMed
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Association of the B-vitamins pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (B(6)), B(12), and folate with lung cancer risk in older men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195150
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Apr 1;153(7):688-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2001
Author
T J Hartman
K. Woodson
R. Stolzenberg-Solomon
J. Virtamo
J. Selhub
M J Barrett
D. Albanes
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Apr 1;153(7):688-94
Date
Apr-1-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Finland - epidemiology
Folic Acid - administration & dosage - blood
Homocysteine - blood
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Pyridoxine - administration & dosage - blood
Reference Values
Risk factors
Sampling Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Vitamin B 12 - administration & dosage - blood
Abstract
A nested case-control study was conducted within the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study cohort to test for associations between selected B-vitamins (folate, vitamin B(6), vitamin B(12)) and incident lung cancer. This trial was conducted in Finland between 1985 and 1993. Serum was analyzed for these nutrients and homocysteine among 300 lung cancer cases and matched controls (1:1). Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were determined in conditional and unconditional (controlling for the matching factors) logistic regression models, after adjusting for body mass index, years of smoking, and number of cigarettes smoked per day. No significant associations were seen between serum folate, vitamin B(12), or homocysteine and lung cancer risk. The authors found significantly lower risk of lung cancer among men who had higher serum vitamin B(6) levels. Compared with men with the lowest vitamin B(6) concentration, men in the fifth quintile had about one half of the risk of lung cancer (odds ratio = 0.51; 95% confidence interval: 0.23, 0.93; p-trend = 0.02). Adjusting for any of the other serum factors (folate, B(12), and homocysteine) either alone or jointly did not significantly alter these estimates. This is the first report from a prospectively conducted study to suggest a role for vitamin B(6) in lung cancer.
PubMed ID
11282797 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular risk factor changes in a three-year follow-up of a cohort in connection with a community programme (the North Karelia Project).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249008
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1978;204(5):381-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1978
Author
P. Puska
J. Virtamo
J. Tuomilehto
J. Mäki
L. Neittaanmäki
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1978;204(5):381-8
Date
1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Cholesterol - blood
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
A re-examination after 3 years was done in 1975 in a 20% random subsample (n = 1683) of the representative population sample (males and females, 25-59 years) that was examined in 1972 in North Karelia (NK), and a matched reference county as the baseline survey for the community programme in NK. The changes in smoking habits, serum cholesterol, dietary fat consumption and systolic BP were more favourable among the subjects in the NK sample than among the reference sample, although the differences were generally small. Results from multivariable analyses are presented to show the variables that predict a favourable risk factor change in the individual. Living in NK is associated in the analysis with a favourable change in each of the three risk factors. The limitation of this method in the evaluation of a community programme is discussed.
PubMed ID
717058 View in PubMed
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Changes in coronary risk factors during comprehensive five-year community programme to control cardiovascular diseases (North Karelia project).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246646
Source
Br Med J. 1979 Nov 10;2(6199):1173-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-1979
Author
P. Puska
J. Tuomilehto
J. Salonen
L. Neittaanmäki
J. Maki
J. Virtamo
A. Nissinen
K. Koskela
T. Takalo
Source
Br Med J. 1979 Nov 10;2(6199):1173-8
Date
Nov-10-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Weight
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Cholesterol - blood
Community Health Services
Female
Finland
Humans
Hypertension - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Risk
Smoking - prevention & control
Time Factors
Abstract
A comprehensive community programme to control cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in North Karelia, Finland, was carried out during 1972-7. The central intermediate objective of the programme was to reduce the prevalence of smoking, the serum cholesterol concentration, and raised blood-pressure values among the population of the area. The effect was evaluated by examining independent representative population samples in 1972 and 1977 in both the county of North Karelia and a matched control county. Over 10 000 subjects were studied each time, the participation rate being around 90%. The decrease that occurred in the risk factors, especially in men, was in general greater in North Karelia compared with the control county. When a multiple logistic function was used for the three risk factors an overall mean net reduction of 17% among men and 12% among women was observed in the estimated risk for coronary heart disease in North Karelia. This community programme effectively reduced the levels of the three main risk factors for CVD in the population, and thus mortality and morbidity from CVD should fall. This is assessed in further studies.
Notes
Cites: Clin Chem. 1956 Oct;2(5):353-6813365118
Cites: Lancet. 1977 Jun 4;1(8023):1192-568285
Cites: Prev Med. 1978 Dec;7(4):539-49756003
Cites: Prev Med. 1978 Dec;7(4):464-75755998
Cites: World Health Stat Q. 1978;31(3):208-346726509
Cites: Acta Med Scand. 1978;204(5):381-8717058
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1978 Aug;108(2):103-11707471
Cites: J Community Health. 1977 Winter;3(2):100-14617630
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1974 Nov;64(11):1071-804411614
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1973 Summer;2(2):137-434777771
Cites: WHO Chron. 1973 Feb;27(2):55-84695971
Cites: Acta Med Scand. 1975 Mar;197(3):211-61124671
Cites: Biometrika. 1967 Jun;54(1):167-796049533
PubMed ID
519351 View in PubMed
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Colorectal cancer and folate status: a nested case-control study among male smokers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211579
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1996 Jul;5(7):487-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1996
Author
S A Glynn
D. Albanes
P. Pietinen
C C Brown
M. Rautalahti
J A Tangrea
E W Gunter
M J Barrett
J. Virtamo
P R Taylor
Author Affiliation
Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1996 Jul;5(7):487-94
Date
Jul-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - physiopathology
Confidence Intervals
Finland - epidemiology
Folic Acid - blood
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Smoking
Tumor Markers, Biological - blood
Abstract
Evidence is accumulating that folate, a B vitamin found in green leafy vegetables, may affect the development of neoplasia. We examined the relationship between folate status and colorectal cancer in a case-control study nested within the Alpha-Tocopherol Beta-Carotene Study cohort of male smokers 50-69 years old. Serum folate was measured in 144 incident cases (91 colon, 53 rectum) and 276 controls matched to cases on baseline age, clinic, and time of blood collection. Baseline dietary folate was available from a food-use questionnaire for 386 of these men (92%). Conditional logistic regression modeling was used. No statistically significant association was observed between serum folate and colon or rectal cancer. Although a 2-fold increase in rectal cancer risk was suggested for men with serum folate > 2.9 ng/ml and those in the highest quartile of energy-adjusted folate intake, there was no evidence of a monotonic dose-response, and all confidence intervals included unity. For dietary folate and colon cancer, odds ratios of 0.40 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.16-0.96], 0.34 (95% CI, 0.13-0.88), and 0.51 (95% CI, 0.20-1.31) were obtained for the second through fourth quartiles of energy-adjusted folate intake, respectively, compared to the first (P for trend = 0.15). Furthermore, men with a high-alcohol, low-folate, low-protein diet were at higher risk for colon cancer than men who consumed a low-alcohol, high-folate, high-protein diet (OR, 4.79; 95% CI, 1.36-16.93). This study suggests a possible association between low folate intake and increased risk of colon cancer (but not rectal cancer) and highlights the need for further studies that measure dietary folate and methionine, along with biochemical measures of folate (i.e., erythrocyte and serum), homocysteine, and vitamin B12.
PubMed ID
8827351 View in PubMed
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Diet and prostate cancer risk in a cohort of smokers, with a specific focus on calcium and phosphorus (Finland).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196664
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2000 Oct;11(9):859-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
J M Chan
P. Pietinen
M. Virtanen
N. Malila
J. Tangrea
D. Albanes
J. Virtamo
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA. jmlchan@hsph.harvard.edu
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2000 Oct;11(9):859-67
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Body mass index
Calcium - metabolism
Calcium, dietary
Dietary Carbohydrates
Dietary Proteins - metabolism
Double-Blind Method
Finland
Fructose - metabolism
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Phosphorus - metabolism
Phosphorus, Dietary
Prostatic Neoplasms - etiology - metabolism
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - metabolism
Abstract
Calcium, phosphorus, fructose, and animal protein are hypothesized to be associated with prostate cancer risk, potentially via their influence on 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. We examined these nutrients and overall diet and prostate cancer risk in the Alpha-Tocopherol Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study (ATBC Study).
The ATBC Study was a randomized 2 x 2 trial of alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene on lung cancer incidence conducted among Finnish male smokers; 27,062 of the men completed a food-use questionnaire at baseline, and comprise the current study population. There were 184 incident clinical (stage 2-4) prostate cancer cases diagnosed between 1985 and 1993. We used Cox proportional hazards models to examine associations between dietary intakes and prostate cancer.
We did not observe significant independent associations for calcium and phosphorus and prostate cancer risk. However, men with lower calcium and higher phosphorus intake had a multivariate relative risk of 0.6 (95% CI 0.3-1.0) compared to men with lower intakes of both nutrients, adjusting for age, smoking, body mass index, total energy, education, and supplementation group. Of the other foods and nutrients examined, none was significantly associated with risk.
This study provides, at best, only weak evidence for the hypothesis that calcium and phosphorus are independently associated with prostate cancer risk, but suggests that there may be an interaction between these nutrients.
PubMed ID
11075876 View in PubMed
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Diet and risk of colorectal cancer in a cohort of Finnish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200491
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1999 Oct;10(5):387-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999
Author
P. Pietinen
N. Malila
M. Virtanen
T J Hartman
J A Tangrea
D. Albanes
J. Virtamo
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1999 Oct;10(5):387-96
Date
Oct-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Cohort Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Diet
Dietary Fats - adverse effects
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Meat
Middle Aged
Risk assessment
Abstract
Based on previous epidemiological studies, high fat and meat consumption may increase and fiber, calcium, and vegetable consumption may decrease the risk of colorectal cancer. We sought to address these hypotheses in a male Finnish cohort.
We analyzed data from the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study (ATBC Study) where 27, 111 male smokers completed a validated dietary questionnaire at baseline. After an average of 8 years of follow-up, we documented 185 cases of colorectal cancer. The analyses were carried out using the Cox proportional hazards model.
The relative risk (RR) for men in the highest quartile of calcium intake compared with men in the lowest quartile was 0.6 (95% CI 0.4-0.9, p for trend 0.04). Likewise, the intake of milk protein and the consumption of milk products was inversely associated with risk of colorectal cancer. However, intake of dietary fiber was not associated with risk, nor was fat intake. Consumption of meat or different types of meat, and fried meat, fruits or vegetables were not associated with risk.
In this cohort of men consuming a diet high in fat, meat, and fiber and low in vegetables, high calcium intake was associated with lowered risk of colorectal cancer.
PubMed ID
10530608 View in PubMed
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Dietary acrylamide exposure among Finnish adults and children: the potential effect of reduction measures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132936
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2011 Nov;28(11):1483-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
T. Hirvonen
M. Jestoi
H. Tapanainen
L. Valsta
S M Virtanen
H. Sinkko
C. Kronberg-Kippilä
J. Kontto
J. Virtamo
O. Simell
K. Peltonen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Food Safety Authority, Risk Assessment Unit, Helsinki, Finland. terohirvonen69@gmail.co
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2011 Nov;28(11):1483-91
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamide - administration & dosage - toxicity
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Diet
Environmental Exposure
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Risk Reduction Behavior
Abstract
A deterministic exposure assessment using the Nusser method that adjusts for within-subject variation and for nuisance effects among Finnish children and adults was carried out. The food consumption data covered 2038 adults (25-74 years old) and 1514 children of 1, 3 and 6 years of age, with the data on foods' acrylamide content obtained from published Finnish studies. We found that acrylamide exposure was highest among the 3-year-old children (median = 1.01 µg kg(-1) bw day(-1), 97.5th percentile = 1.95 µg kg(-1) bw day(-1)) and lowest among 65-74-year-old women (median = 0.31 µg kg(-1) bw day(-1), 97.5th percentile = 0.69 µg kg(-1) bw day(-1)). Among adults, the most important source of acrylamide exposure was coffee, followed by casseroles rich in starch, then rye bread. Among children, the most important sources were casseroles rich in starch and then biscuits and, finally, chips and other fried potatoes. Replacing lightly roasted coffee with dark-roasted, swapping sweet wheat buns for biscuits, and decreasing the acrylamide content of starch-based casseroles and rye bread by 50% would result in a 50% decrease in acrylamide exposure in adults. Among children, substituting boiled potatoes for chips and other friend potatoes and replacing biscuits with sweet wheat buns while lowering the acrylamide content of starch-based casseroles by 50% would lead to acrylamide exposure that is only half of the original exposure. In conclusions, dietary modifications could have a large impact in decreasing acrylamide exposure.
PubMed ID
21762033 View in PubMed
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61 records – page 1 of 7.