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Male occupational therapists in Ontario: a survey of work-related issues.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216735
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 1994 Dec;61(5):277-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1994
Author
J. Turgeon
J A Hay
Author Affiliation
Cornwall General Hospital, Ontario.
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 1994 Dec;61(5):277-84
Date
Dec-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Allied Health Personnel - psychology
Attitude of Health Personnel
Career Choice
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Therapy - manpower - statistics & numerical data
Ontario
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Abstract
Job satisfaction greatly influences an individual's decision to remain in his or her work situation. In many studies, one of the primary reasons for men leaving the profession of occupational therapy was due to job dissatisfaction. The purpose of this study was to further investigate the issue of job satisfaction in male occupational therapists. In March 1992, a survey was mailed to all (n = 82) male occupational therapists practicing in Ontario. A 67% (n = 55) response rate was obtained. This study addressed several factors pertaining to job satisfaction and other work-related issues. When using the median years of OT work experience (ie. seven) to divide the sample, two items were found to be significantly different when using one-way analyses of variance (ANOVA's): "satisfaction with the standing of the profession" and cumulative "satisfaction variable" items. In this study, less experienced male occupational therapists reported themselves to be less satisfied, more inclined to leave the profession or pursue another profession, but did not feel more isolated than their more experienced counterparts. The means of all items revealed a feeling of dissatisfaction on the Likert-scale used in this survey. Although no statistical significance could be achieved, a clear trend existed toward a lower level of satisfaction among the less experienced group.
PubMed ID
10138990 View in PubMed
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Nature of the clinical difficulties of first-year family medicine residents under direct observation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224328
Source
CMAJ. 1992 Feb 15;146(4):489-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-1992
Author
A. Beaumier
G. Bordage
D. Saucier
J. Turgeon
Author Affiliation
Unité de médecine familiale, Hôpital Laval, Sainte-Foy, Que.
Source
CMAJ. 1992 Feb 15;146(4):489-97
Date
Feb-15-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence - statistics & numerical data
Family Practice - education
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Internship and Residency - statistics & numerical data
Interviews as Topic
Medical History Taking
Physician-Patient Relations
Quebec
Abstract
To determine and classify the difficulties of first-year family medicine residents observed during clinical interviews.
Retrospective, descriptive study.
Family practice unit at a teaching hospital.
Forty-seven of the 56 first-year family medicine residents during their 2-month compulsory rotation in ambulatory family medicine, between July 1983 and December 1988, and 4 physicians who supervised the residents.
The residents' difficulties noted on the observation forms.
A total of 1500 difficulties were observed during 194 interviews, an average of 7.7 (standard deviation 5.2) per interview. There were 167 different difficulties, which were classified into seven categories (introduction, initial contract, body of the interview, techniques and organization, interpersonal aspects, final contract and miscellaneous) and 20 subcategories. The 17 most frequently noted difficulties accounted for 40% of the total.
The results constitute a useful starting point for developing a classification of residents' difficulties during clinical interviews. We believe that the list of difficulties is applicable to residents at all levels and in other specialties, especially in ambulatory settings. The list can be used to develop learning materials for supervisors and residents.
Notes
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PubMed ID
1737313 View in PubMed
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