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An examination of the feasibility of developing and offering courses that meet MAINPRO-C requirements.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208472
Source
Acad Med. 1997 May;72(5):458-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1997

Assessment of physician performance in Alberta: the physician achievement review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201357
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Jul 13;161(1):52-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-13-1999
Author
W. Hall
C. Violato
R. Lewkonia
J. Lockyer
H. Fidler
J. Toews
P. Jennett
M. Donoff
D. Moores
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alta.
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Jul 13;161(1):52-7
Date
Jul-13-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Humans
Medical Audit - methods
Multivariate Analysis
Patient satisfaction
Peer Review, Health Care - methods
Physicians - standards
Pilot Projects
Program Development
Psychometrics - methods
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Alberta, in collaboration with the Universities of Calgary and Alberta, has developed a program to routinely assess the performance of physicians, intended primarily for quality improvement in medical practice. The Physician Achievement Review (PAR) provides a multidimensional view of performance through structured feedback to physicians. The program will also provide a new mechanism for identifying physicians for whom more detailed assessment of practice performance or medical competence may be needed. Questionnaires were created to assess an array of performance attributes, and then appropriate assessors were designated--the physician himself or herself (self-evaluation), patients, medical peers, consultants and referring physicians, and non-physician coworkers. A pilot study with 308 physician volunteers was used to evaluate the psychometric and statistical properties of the questionnaires and to develop operating policies. The pilot surveys showed good statistical validity and technical reliability of the PAR questionnaires. For only 28 (9.1%) of the physicians were the PAR results more than one standard deviation from the peer group means for 3 or more of the 5 major domains of assessment (self, patients, peers, consultants and coworkers). In post-survey feedback, two-thirds of the physicians indicated that they were considering or had implemented changes to their medical practice on the basis of their PAR data. The estimated operating cost of the PAR program is approximately $200 per physician. In February 1999, on the basis of the operating experience and the results of the pilot survey, the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Alberta implemented this innovative program, in which all Alberta physicians will be required to participate every 5 years.
Notes
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 1993 Mar;8(3):135-98455109
Cites: CMAJ. 1990 Dec 1;143(11):1193-92224696
Cites: Fam Pract. 1996 Feb;13(1):52-88671104
Cites: CMAJ. 1995 Dec 15;153(12):1723-88529186
Cites: Acad Med. 1994 Mar;69(3):216-248135980
Cites: Acad Med. 1993 Sep;68(9):680-78397633
Cites: JAMA. 1993 Apr 7;269(13):1655-608240483
Comment In: CMAJ. 1999 Jul 13;161(1):44-510420865
Comment In: CMAJ. 2000 Jun 27;162(13):180310906910
PubMed ID
10420867 View in PubMed
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A call for primary prevention: reality or utopia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229684
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1989 Dec;34(9):928-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1989
Author
J. Toews
N. el-Guebaly
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Alberta.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1989 Dec;34(9):928-33
Date
Dec-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Mental Health Services - trends
Forecasting
Health Promotion - trends
Humans
Mental Disorders - prevention & control
Risk factors
Utopias
Abstract
The efficacy of primary prevention of mental disorders has been debated over the years. The debate is complicated by ideology, semantic confusion, methodological difficulties and a paucity of good evaluative studies. This paper reviews newer concepts of primary prevention and mental health promotion, methodological issues, model programs, and inherent ethical concerns. Further evaluative studies and an increased contribution of psychiatrists to the primary prevention debate are recommended as necessary steps in further evolution of the field.
PubMed ID
2692809 View in PubMed
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Changing radiation dose from diagnostic computed tomography examinations in Saskatchewan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129884
Source
Can Assoc Radiol J. 2012 Aug;63(3):183-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Chance S Dumaine
David A Leswick
Derek A Fladeland
Hyun J Lim
Lori J Toews
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.
Source
Can Assoc Radiol J. 2012 Aug;63(3):183-91
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Head - radiography
Humans
Male
Pelvis - radiography
Radiation Dosage
Radiography, Abdominal
Radiography, Thoracic
Saskatchewan
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
Follow-up study to observe if provincial mean effective radiation dose for head, chest, and abdomen-pelvis (AP) computed tomographies (CTs) remained stable or changed since the initial 2006 survey.
Data were collected in July 2008 from Saskatchewan's 13 diagnostic CT scanners of 3358 CT examinations. These data included the number of scan phases and projected dose length product (DLP). Technologists compared projected DLP with 2006 reference data before scanning. Projected DLP was converted to effective dose (ED) for each head, chest, and AP CT. The total dose that the patients received with scans of multiple body parts at the same visit also was determined.
The mean (± SD) provincial ED was 3.4 ± 1.6 mSv for 1023 head scans (2.7 ± 1.6 mSv in 2006), 9.6 ± 4.8 mSv for 588 chest scans (11.3 ± 8.9 mSv in 2006), and 16.1 ± 9.9 mSv for 983 AP scans (15.5 ± 10.0 mSv in 2006). Single-phase multidetector row CT ED decreased by 31% for chest scans (9.5 ± 3.9 mSv vs 13.7 ± 9.7 mSv in 2006) and 17% for AP scans (13.9 ± 6.0 mSv vs 16.8 ± 10.6 mSv in 2006) and increased by 19% for head scans (3.2 ± 1.2 mSv vs 2.7 ± 1.5 mSv in 2006). The total patient dose was highest (33.8 ± 10.1 mSv) for the 20 patients who received head, neck, chest, and AP scans during a single visit. Because of increased utilisation and the increased CT head dose, Saskatchewan per capital radiation dose from CT increased by 21% between 2006 and 2008 (1.14 vs 1.38 mSv/person per year).
Significant dose and variation reduction was seen for single-phase CT chest and AP examinations between 2006 and 2008, whereas CT head dose increased over the same interval. These changes, combined with increased utilisation, resulted in per capita increase in radiation dose from CT between the 2 studies.
PubMed ID
22054699 View in PubMed
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Commitment to change statements: a way of understanding how participants use information and skills taught in an educational session.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194265
Source
J Contin Educ Health Prof. 2001;21(2):82-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
J M Lockyer
H. Fidler
R. Ward
R J Basson
S. Elliott
J. Toews
Author Affiliation
Continuing Medical Education and Professional Development, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, AB T2N 4N1.
Source
J Contin Educ Health Prof. 2001;21(2):82-9
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Behavior
Canada
Chi-Square Distribution
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Continuing - methods
Educational Measurement
Humans
Male
Physician's Practice Patterns
Primary Health Care
Sexual Dysfunction, Physiological - therapy
Abstract
Commitment to change has gained increasing use in assessing short course effectiveness. This study examined the changes that learners intended to make in practice following an intensive day-long course offered at multiple sites, counted changes relative to the curriculum's focus, and analyzed which changes were implemented in practice.
Participants at a course on the management of male sexual dysfunction were asked to identify the changes to which they would commit. Six months after the course, they were asked to indicate which changes they implemented fully, partially, or not at all.
A total of 352 physicians attended the courses held in 21 centers. A majority of attendees (344 or 97.7%) completed forms at the end of the course, providing 1,635 commitment statements. Six months later, 197 (57.3%) physicians provided follow-up data about 935 (55.4%) of the commitment statements originally submitted. Of these, 602 (66.52%) were completely implemented. Many of the changes related to two specific aspects of the course, namely, sexual history taking and medical intervention, accounting for 45.93% of the intended commitments and 47.67% of the changes completely implemented. Slightly over half (58%) of the course time was devoted to these two areas. There was a significant correlation between the number of changes and the amount of time allocated to that content within the course.
Commitment to change statements offered by course participants can be used to examine the impact of a course relative to its learning focus. Continuing medical education providers must take a critical look at commitment to change statements as an "intervention" in their own right and determine how the tool can best be used as a continuing medical education intervention.
PubMed ID
11420869 View in PubMed
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Continuing education for psychiatrists: report on Canadian Psychiatric Association questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244286
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1981 Aug;26(5):316-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1981
Author
M G Thompson
J. Toews
J M Lundgren
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1981 Aug;26(5):316-22
Date
Aug-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Curriculum
Education, Continuing
Humans
Middle Aged
Psychiatry - education
Abstract
This report on the CPA Questionnaire on Continuing Education represents the answers of a sample of 485 of the 1,360 certified psychiatrists belonging to the Association. A total of 72.6% of the sample lived in urban centres with populations greater than 200,000; 28.9% worked in solo practice, but only 7.4% worked in settings where no other psychiatrists were present. The amount of time spent in continuing education activities was found to vary inversely with the distance that had to be travelled to major educational centres. Nevertheless, there were no psychiatrists that did not partake in some continuing education activities. Ninety-three percent read journals, 99% went to meetings, and 96% used consultation with other psychiatrists; 99% stated that these activities were useful. The favourite methods were reading and consultation. Eighty percent of the sample spent more than 41 hours per month in continuing education activities. Sixty-five percent stated that they would like a voluntary credit award system instituted. It is concluded that Canadian psychiatrists do spend a great deal of time in continuing education activities and believe that this is of value to their professional work.
PubMed ID
7296447 View in PubMed
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Feasibility and psychometric properties of using peers, consulting physicians, co-workers, and patients to assess physicians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207443
Source
Acad Med. 1997 Oct;72(10 Suppl 1):S82-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1997

Mental health professionals' knowledge in the field of caring for chronic mental disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239307
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1985;21(11):1229-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
G E Barnes
J. Toews
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1985;21(11):1229-33
Date
1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Chronic Disease
Community Mental Health Services - trends
Deinstitutionalization - trends
Education, Continuing - trends
Female
Health Services Needs and Demand - trends
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - therapy
Psychology, Clinical - education
Abstract
A national sample of 246 Canadian mental health professionals was given a knowledge test concerning principles of care for chronic mental patients. Results showed that: (1) mental health professionals were moderately knowledgeable on this topic (mean score 66%), (2) errors made were more commonly in the direction of over-enthusiastic support for the community approach and (3) there were no differences in knowledge scores by a demographic or professional status variables included in this study.
PubMed ID
4095575 View in PubMed
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Patient care review: results of the Canadian Psychiatric Association Hospital Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240445
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1984 Jun;29(4):323-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1984
Author
M G Thompson
J. Toews
J. Lundgren
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1984 Jun;29(4):323-6
Date
Jun-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education, Medical, Continuing
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Medical Records, Problem-Oriented
Mental Disorders - therapy
Patient Care Planning
Psychiatry - education
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Abstract
This paper is a report of the Education and Professional Liaison Council of the Canadian Psychiatric Association on the results of its questionnaire to 104 psychiatric hospital facilities in Canada on the extent, type and usefulness of patient care review procedures. The results indicate that the majority of hospitals appear to have initiated one or more patient care review activities within the last decade and have been carrying these out on a regular basis. These procedures have been considered useful for patient care and for continuing medical education. Both the frequency of patient care review activity and the type of procedure used, however, are directly related to the number of psychiatrists present in the center, with those hospitals having the least resources indicating little or no activity.
PubMed ID
6610470 View in PubMed
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Patients' reactions to their commitment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244423
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1981 Jun;26(4):251-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1981
Author
J. Toews
N. El-Guebaly
A. Leckie
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1981 Jun;26(4):251-4
Date
Jun-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Female
Forensic Psychiatry
Humans
Male
Manitoba
Mental Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Middle Aged
Patient Advocacy
Abstract
The authors surveyed the reactions toward commitment of 61 respondents out of a sample of 100 patients who had been committed to hospital during a one year period. The patients reported little change in their life situation as a result of committal and most viewed committal quite neutrally. They generally felt uninformed of their rights and indicated little intent to appeal the commitments, but wished to be assured that their rights were being considered and protected. Most saw psychiatrists as the professional group best equipped to bring about a committal. The importance of consumer surveys in controversial areas such as this is underscored.
PubMed ID
7296438 View in PubMed
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13 records – page 1 of 2.