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Tools for the prioritization of substances on the Domestic Substances List in Canada on the basis of hazard.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148466
Source
Regul Toxicol Pharmacol. 2009 Dec;55(3):382-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
K. Hughes
J. Paterson
M E Meek
Author Affiliation
Safe Environments Directorate, Health Canada, AL 4904D, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0K9. Kathy_hughes@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Regul Toxicol Pharmacol. 2009 Dec;55(3):382-93
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental Health - methods
Hazardous Substances - toxicity
Humans
Risk Assessment - methods
Abstract
A precedent setting legislative mandate under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act 1999 to establish priorities for assessment based on systematic consideration of all of the approximately 23,000 Existing Chemicals in Canada required the development and refinement of methodology in a number of important areas. This included development of simple and complex exposure and hazard tools for priority setting which draw maximally and efficiently on available data to systematically identify substances that are highest priorities in relation to their potential to cause adverse effects on the general population. The hierarchical approach in the simple and complex hazard tools described here efficiently and effectively sets substances aside as non-priorities, or prioritizes them for consideration additionally in assessment. The hazard tools efficiently incorporate previous work, contributing to consistency internationally, and involve hierarchical consideration of sources of information based on their relative weighting. They are health protective, based on their incorporated degree of conservatism, and provide direction for additional assessment for substances deemed to be priorities. Although designed for prioritization of Existing Substances in Canada, these tools have potential for broader application in other national and international programs to provide focus and increase efficiency in human health risk assessment.
PubMed ID
19766685 View in PubMed
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Cleaning of anaesthesia breathing circuits and tubings: a Canadian survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240156
Source
Can Anaesth Soc J. 1984 Sep;31(5):572-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1984
Author
A E Barry
M A Noble
T J Marrie
I J Paterson
Source
Can Anaesth Soc J. 1984 Sep;31(5):572-5
Date
Sep-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesiology - instrumentation
Canada
Decontamination - methods
Detergents
Disinfection - methods
Equipment Contamination
Humans
Sterilization - methods
Abstract
A cross-Canada survey of 38 university-affiliated hospitals with over 250 beds was undertaken to examine the procedures for cleaning anaesthetic tubings and circuits. Twenty-eight (74 per cent) hospitals responded. Gluteraldehyde was the most commonly used method (13/28), and pasteurization was the second most used method (9/28). These two methods are described and recommendations are made for basic requirements for disinfection.
PubMed ID
6498573 View in PubMed
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