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Walking performance and health-related quality of life after surgical or endovascular invasive versus non-invasive treatment for intermittent claudication--a prospective randomised trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136253
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2011 Aug;42(2):220-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
J. Nordanstig
J. Gelin
M. Hensäter
C. Taft
K. Österberg
L. Jivegård
Author Affiliation
Department of Vascular Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden. joakim.nordanstig@vgregion.se
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2011 Aug;42(2):220-7
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angiography, Digital Subtraction
Ankle Brachial Index
Cardiovascular Agents - therapeutic use
Endovascular Procedures
Exercise Test
Exercise Therapy
Female
Humans
Intermittent Claudication - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology - surgery
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Selection
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Recovery of Function
Risk Reduction Behavior
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex
Vascular Surgical Procedures
Walking
Abstract
Despite limited scientific evidence for the effectiveness of invasive treatment for intermittent claudication (IC), revascularisation procedures for IC are increasingly often performed in Sweden. This randomised controlled trial compares the outcome after 2 years of primary invasive (INV) versus primary non-invasive (NON) treatment strategies in unselected IC patients.
Based on arterial duplex and clinical examination, IC patients were randomised to INV (endovascular and/or surgical, n = 100) or NON (n = 101). NON patients could request invasive treatment if they deteriorated during follow-up. Primary outcome was maximal walking performance (MWP) on graded treadmill test at 2 years and secondary outcomes included health-related quality of life (HRQL), assessed with Short Form (36) Health Survey (SF-36).
MWP was not significantly (p = 0.104) improved in the INV versus the NON group. Two SF-36 physical subscales, Bodily Pain (p
Notes
Comment In: Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2011 Aug;42(2):228-921531592
PubMed ID
21397530 View in PubMed
Less detail

Low post-operative mortality after surgery on patients with screening-detected abdominal aortic aneurysms: a Swedvasc registry study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260421
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2014 Dec;48(6):649-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
A. Linné
K. Smidfelt
M. Langenskiöld
R. Hultgren
J. Nordanstig
B. Kragsterman
D. Lindström
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2014 Dec;48(6):649-56
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - diagnosis - mortality - surgery
Endovascular Procedures - adverse effects - mortality
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Medical Audit
Patient Selection
Postoperative Complications - mortality
Predictive value of tests
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Vascular Surgical Procedures - adverse effects - mortality
Abstract
Screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) substantially reduces aneurysm-related mortality in men and is increasing worldwide. This cohort study compares post-operative mortality and complications in men with screening-detected vs. non-screening-detected AAAs.
Data were extracted from the Swedish National Registry for Vascular Surgery (Swedvasc) for all screening-detected men treated for AAA (n = 350) and age-matched controls treated for non-screening-detected AAA (n = 350).
There were no differences in baseline characteristics besides age, which was lower in the screening-detected group than in the non-screening-detected group (median 66 vs. 68, p
Notes
Comment In: Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2014 Dec;48(6):657-825465471
PubMed ID
25301773 View in PubMed
Less detail