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Capturing tumour stage in a cancer information database.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200991
Source
Cancer Prev Control. 1998 Dec;2(6):304-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
W K Evans
J. Crook
D. Read
J. Morriss
D M Logan
Author Affiliation
Ottawa Regional Cancer Centre, Cancer Care Ontario. bevans@cancercare.on.ca
Source
Cancer Prev Control. 1998 Dec;2(6):304-9
Date
Dec-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cancer Care Facilities
Databases, Factual
Female
Hospital Information Systems
Humans
Male
Medical Oncology
Medical Records
Neoplasm Staging - standards
Ontario
Prospective Studies
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
1. To present the steps taken and lessons learned from one cancer centre's efforts to capture tumour stage information in a cancer database. 2. To determine the accuracy of the stage data through a chart audit. 3. To describe the potential uses of stage information in a cancer centre.
This is a retrospective review of an initiative to capture tumour stage information at a regional cancer centre in Ontario.
The minutes of the centre's Health Records and Medical Advisory Committees related to staging were reviewed. Data on stage by tumour type was extracted from the centre's Oncology Patient Information System (OPIS). Three hundred and ninety charts were analysed to assess the accuracy of stage information and identify staging errors. Health Information Services workload statistics were reviewed to determine the types and frequency of projects undertaken using stage-related data.
In January 1994, the Ottawa Regional Cancer Centre introduced policies and procedures to capture stage-related information. Standardized staging forms and a physician reminder system encouraged the centre's physicians to record tumour stage within 3 months of new patient registration. Of all qualifying cases in 1994, 92% were staged. A medical audit in 1998 of 390 charts from the 3 previous years of staging data revealed that 71.5% of the charts reviewed had been staged completely. Of the incompletely staged cases, 19% to 57% had TNM recorded, but the stage grouping was not recorded, or the "stage" was the extent of disease at the time of disease progression rather than at initial diagnosis (35% to 71%). Physician-related staging errors occurred in 2% to 5% of cases; data-entry errors occurred in 3% to 6% of cases.
Stage information has enabled the centre to better describe its patient clientele for accreditation purposes and to assist researchers in estimating the number of patients potentially available for prospective and retrospective studies. It is being used to guide targeted educational initiatives to selected populations in the region's catchment area and assists administrators in estimating resource needs. Resistance to the capture of stage information can be overcome with persistence, the development of procedures that facilitate physician compliance, including a reminder system, the development of institutional policies and procedures and by feedback on the uses and availability of stage information.
PubMed ID
10470461 View in PubMed
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Survival of women with breast cancer in Ottawa, Canada: variation with age, stage, histology, grade and treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181049
Source
Br J Cancer. 2004 Mar 22;90(6):1138-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-22-2004
Author
A M Ugnat
L. Xie
J. Morriss
R. Semenciw
Y. Mao
Author Affiliation
Surveillance and Risk Assessment Division, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Population and Public Health Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1A 0K9. Anne-Marie_Ugnat@hc-sc.ca
Source
Br J Cancer. 2004 Mar 22;90(6):1138-43
Date
Mar-22-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - mortality - pathology - therapy
Chemotherapy, Adjuvant
Combined Modality Therapy
Female
Histology
Humans
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Neoplasm Staging
Ontario - epidemiology
Radiotherapy, Adjuvant
Retrospective Studies
Survival Analysis
Abstract
This study examined the 5-year survival of 2192 breast cancer women diagnosed between 1994 and 1997 in Ottawa, Canada, by age, TNM stage, histology, grade and treatment, including assessment of the independent value of variables in defining prognosis. Our results showed that age, stage, treatment and grade significantly influenced outcome regardless of the confounding factors considered, with histology failing to achieve significant independent prognostic information. The survival rates were highest at ages 50-69 years for stage I and at ages 40-49 years for stages II-IV. The rates were lowest at ages or=70 years for stages III-IV. The differences in survival between grade 1 and grade 3 were 9% in stage I and 20% in stage II. The treatment leading to the best survival was surgery plus radiation for stages I-II and surgery combined with chemotherapy for stages III-IV. Lobular carcinoma had a better prognosis than ductal carcinoma; this can be explained by more grade 1 and less grade 3 cases in lobular carcinoma. The worse prognosis for young patients than other ages can be explained by their higher proportion of poorly differentiated cancers. Stage I patients aged 50-69 years having the best survival is likely due to the earlier diagnosis achieved through screening.
Notes
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PubMed ID
15026792 View in PubMed
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