Skip header and navigation

Refine By

9 records – page 1 of 1.

The 3-year follow-up study in a block of flats - experiences in the use of the Finnish indoor climate classification.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185305
Source
Indoor Air. 2003 Jun;13(2):136-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
M. Tuomainen
A. Tuomainen
J. Liesivuori
A-L Pasanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Kuopio, Finland. marja.tuomainen@hengitysliitto.fi
Source
Indoor Air. 2003 Jun;13(2):136-47
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air pollution, indoor
Allergens - analysis
Ammonia - analysis
Asthma - prevention & control
Bacteria
Carbon Dioxide - analysis
Carbon Monoxide - analysis
Construction Materials - standards
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Housing - standards
Humans
Humidity
Questionnaires
Spores, Fungal
Temperature
Abstract
Indoor climate of two new blocks of flats was investigated. The case building was built for people with respiratory diseases by following the instructions of the Finnish Classification of Indoor Climate, Construction and Finishing Materials, while the control building was built using conventional building technology. The main indoor air parameters (temperature, relative humidity and levels of CO, CO2, ammonia, total volatile organic compounds, total suspended particles, fungal spores, bacteria and cat, dog and house dust mite allergens) were measured in six apartments of both the buildings on five occasions during the 3-year occupancy. In addition, a questionnaire to evaluate symptoms of the occupants and their satisfaction with their home environment was conducted in connection with indoor air quality (IAQ) measurements. The levels of indoor air pollutants in the case building were, in general, lower than those in the control building. In addition, the asthmatic occupants informed that their symptoms had decreased during the occupancy in the case building. This case study showed that high IAQ is possible to reach by careful design, proper materials and equipment and on high-quality construction with reasonable additional costs. In addition, the study indicated that good IAQ can also be maintained during the occupancy, if sufficient information on factors affecting IAQ and guidance on proper use and care of equipment are available for occupants.
PubMed ID
12756007 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of pesticide exposure, vaccination response, and interleukin-1 gene polymorphisms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153968
Source
Hum Exp Toxicol. 2008 Sep;27(9):709-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
M. Baranska
L. Van Amelsvoort
S. Birindelli
S. Fustinoni
E. Corsini
J. Liesivuori
H. Van Loveren
Author Affiliation
Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz, Poland.
Source
Hum Exp Toxicol. 2008 Sep;27(9):709-13
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Bulgaria
Cross-Sectional Studies
Finland
Gene Frequency
Genotype
Hepatitis B Vaccines - immunology
Humans
Immune System - drug effects - immunology - physiopathology
Immunity - drug effects - immunology
Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein - genetics
Interleukin-1 - genetics
Interleukin-1alpha - genetics
Interleukin-1beta - genetics
Italy
Netherlands
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Pesticides - poisoning
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Genetic
Risk assessment
Vaccination
Abstract
We performed a cross-sectional study involving workers from four European countries in which exposure to pesticides and immune parameters were evaluated over a short period of time. The total study population consisted of 238 workers occupationally exposed to pesticides and 198 nonoccupationally exposed workers. The study showed that pesticide exposure at levels encountered by workers under different conditions in Europe did not affect the ability of the immune system to respond to vaccination. We could, however, identify individuals within the group of pesticide exposed workers who were genetically characterized by the 2.2 IL-1alpha polymorphism and who showed a lower antibody response, pointing out the importance of the understanding of genetic variability and the interaction between genetic and environmental factors in the identification of high-risk individuals, which may eventually lead to preventive measures.
PubMed ID
19042953 View in PubMed
Less detail

Asthmatic symptoms after exposure to ethylenebisdithiocarbamates and other pesticides in the Europit field studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153966
Source
Hum Exp Toxicol. 2008 Sep;27(9):721-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
D. Boers
L. van Amelsvoort
C. Colosio
E. Corsini
S. Fustinoni
L. Campo
C. Bosetti
C. La Vecchia
T. Vergieva
M. Tarkowski
J. Liesivuori
P. Steerenberg
H. van Loveren
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Maastricht University, The Netherlands.
Source
Hum Exp Toxicol. 2008 Sep;27(9):721-7
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asthma - etiology - immunology - urine
Bulgaria
Ethylenebis(dithiocarbamates) - poisoning
Ethylenethiourea - analysis
Female
Finland
Fungicides, Industrial - poisoning
Humans
Italy
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Netherlands
Occupational Diseases - etiology - immunology - urine
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Odds Ratio
Pesticides - poisoning
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Respiratory Sounds - etiology - immunology
Risk Assessment - methods - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
We conducted a multicenter prospective study to assess the effects of occupational exposure to ethylenebisdithiocarbamate fungicides and/or other pesticides on self-reported asthma and asthmatic symptoms. This multicenter study was conducted among 248 workers exposed to pesticides and 231 non-exposed workers from five field studies. The five field studies were carried out in The Netherlands, Italy, Finland, and two studies in Bulgaria. Subjects constituting this cohort completed a self-administered questionnaire at baseline (before the start of exposure). Ethylenethiourea in urine was determined to assess exposure to ethylenebisdithiocarbamates. In multivariate analyses adjusted for all potential confounders (age, education, residence, smoking, gender, and field study), we found inverse associations, all not statistically significant, between occupational exposure to pesticides and asthma diagnosis (OR 0.41; 95% CI 0.15-1.11), complains of chest tightness (OR 0.60; 95% CI 0.36-1.02), wheeze (OR 0.56; 95% CI 0.32-0.98), asthma attack (OR 0.52; 95% CI 0.12-2.25), and asthma medication (OR 0.79; 95% CI 0.25-2.53). Furthermore, we reported null associations for multivariate analysis using ethylenethiourea as determinant for exposure. Although exposure to pesticides remains a potential health risk, our results do not suggest an association between exposure to ethylenebisdithiocarbamates and/or other pesticides used in our study on asthma and asthmatic symptoms.
PubMed ID
19042955 View in PubMed
Less detail

Biological monitoring and questionnaire for assessing exposure to ethylenebisdithiocarbamates in a multicenter European field study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153970
Source
Hum Exp Toxicol. 2008 Sep;27(9):681-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
S. Fustinoni
L. Campo
J. Liesivuori
S. Pennanen
T. Vergieva
Lgpm van Amelsvoort
C. Bosetti
H. Van Loveren
C. Colosio
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, University of Milan and Fondazione IRCCS Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Mangiagalli e Regina Elena, Milan, Italy. silvia.fustinoni@unimi.it
Source
Hum Exp Toxicol. 2008 Sep;27(9):681-91
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Agriculture
Bulgaria
Creatine - urine
Environmental Monitoring - methods - statistics & numerical data
Ethylenebis(dithiocarbamates) - poisoning
Ethylenethiourea - analysis
Female
Finland
Humans
Italy
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Occupations - classification
Questionnaires
Risk Assessment - methods - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Abstract
This study deals with pesticide exposure profile in some European countries with a specific focus on ethylenebisdithiocarbamates (EBDC). In all, 55 Bulgarian greenhouse workers, 51 Finnish potato farmers, 48 Italian vineyard workers, 42 Dutch floriculture farmers, and 52 Bulgarian zineb producers entered the study. Each group was matched with a group of not occupationally exposed subjects. Exposure data were gained through self-administered questionnaires and measuring ethylenethiourea (ETU) in two spot urine samples collected, respectively, before the beginning of seasonal exposure (T0), and after 30 days, at the end of the exposure period (T30). Controls underwent a similar protocol. Study agriculture workers were involved in mixing and loading pesticides, application of pesticide mixture with mechanical or manual equipments, re-entry activities, and cleaning equipments. Chemical workers were involved in synthesis, quality controls, and packing activities. The number of pesticides to whom these subjects were exposed varied from one (zineb production) to eight (potato farmers). The use of personal protective devices was variegate and regarded both aerial and dermal penetration routes. EBDC exposure, assessed by T30 urinary ETU, was found to follow the order: greenhouse workers, zineb producers, vineyard workers, potato farmers, floriculture farmers with median levels of 49.6, 23.0, 11.8, 7.5, and 0.9 microg/g creatinine; the last group having ETU at the same level of controls (approximately 0.5 microg/g creatinine). Among agriculture workers, pesticide application, especially using manual equipment, seems to be the major determinant in explaining internal dose. Although the analysis of self-administered questionnaires evidenced difficulties especially related to lack and/or poor quality of reported data, biological monitoring confirms to be a powerful tool in assessing pesticide exposure.
PubMed ID
19042950 View in PubMed
Less detail

Endotoxins and IgG antibodies as indicators of occupational exposure to the microbial contaminants of metal-working fluids.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200412
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 1999 Oct;72(7):443-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999
Author
S. Laitinen
M. Linnainmaa
J. Laitinen
H. Kiviranta
M. Reiman
J. Liesivuori
Author Affiliation
Kuopio Regional Institute of Occupational Health, P.O. Box 93, FIN-70701 Kuopio, Finland. sirpa.laitinen@occuphealth.fi
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 1999 Oct;72(7):443-50
Date
Oct-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Microbiology
Endotoxins - blood
Finland
Fungi
Gram-Negative Bacteria
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Industrial Oils - microbiology
Linear Models
Metals
Mineral Oil - analysis
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Plant Oils - analysis
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate workers' exposure to microbes and bacterial endotoxins during the use of metal-working fluids (MWF).
Air and bulk sampling with biomonitoring of workers' serum IgG antibodies were used to estimate the exposure to biological agents at 18 workplaces. The types of emulsified MWF used were synthetic fluid, mineral oil or rape seed oil, in grinding, turning and drilling work.
The endotoxin concentrations in the air ranged from 0.04 to 600 ng/m(3) when the endotoxin levels in MWF were 0.03-25,000 ng/ml. A high correlation was found between the endotoxin levels and the bacterial counts from MWF, as well as between the total culturable bacteria and the gram-negative bacteria concentrations in the air. Comamonas testosteroni and C. acidovorans were the most common strains in the samples but also colonies of Ochrobactrum anthropi, Pantoea agglomerans and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia were isolated from the workplaces. Fungi like Aspergillus, Cladosporium and Penicillium species were identified in the air but only rarely in the MWF. Positive IgG antibodies were found in the sera of 22 of the 25 MWF workers examined. Antibodies against S. maltophilia, P. agglomerans and C. acidovorans were the most common, appearing in 72%, 64% and 64%, respectively, of the cases. The MWF workers showed significantly higher IgG antibody responses to bacterial antigens than did the controls.
The results clearly proved that in occupational hygiene measurements, endotoxins serve as excellent indicators of exposure to the microbial contaminants of MWF. IgG antibodies against antigens identified from workplace samples could be a practical tool for occupational health physicians.
PubMed ID
10541909 View in PubMed
Less detail

Evaluation of workers' exposure to 2-ethylhexanoic acid (2-EHA) in Finnish sawmills. A field study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103396
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 1990;62(3):213-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
S. Kröger
J. Liesivuori
A. Manninen
Author Affiliation
Kuopio Regional Institute of Occupational Health, Finland.
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 1990;62(3):213-6
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis
Caproates - analysis - pharmacokinetics - urine
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Pesticide Residues - analysis - pharmacokinetics - urine
Regression Analysis
Skin Absorption
Wood
Abstract
Exposure to a new wood preservative agent (Sinesto B), whose active ingredient is 2-ethylhexanoic acid (2-EHA), was determined by urinalysis of the parent chemical and its metabolites in workers employed in four Finnish sawmills. The excretion of these chemicals was compared with the inhaled dose analyzed in air samples collected at the breathing zone and with the percutaneous absorption determined by epicutaneous sampling. The main route for entrance of 2-EHA into the body is by breathing, because the urinary concentration of 2-EHA correlated linearly with the concentration of 2-EHA in the air (r = 0.70). There was no correlation between skin contamination and urinary levels of 2-EHA. In most cases the highest urinary concentrations of 2-EHA were found immediately after the work shift. Therefore, in order to evaluate a worker's exposure, the urine sample has to be taken immediately after the work shift. Workers in cranes had the highest exposure to 2-EHA, which describes well the evaporation of Sinesto B into the ambient air. 2-EHA was not found in the urine of non-exposed workers.
PubMed ID
2347643 View in PubMed
Less detail

Exposure to airborne microorganisms and volatile organic compounds in different types of waste handling.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201706
Source
Ann Agric Environ Med. 1999;6(1):39-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
H. Kiviranta
A. Tuomainen
M. Reiman
S. Laitinen
A. Nevalainen
J. Liesivuori
Author Affiliation
Kuopio Regional Institute of Occupational Health, P.O. Box 93, FIN-70701 Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Ann Agric Environ Med. 1999;6(1):39-44
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Microbiology
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects - analysis
Chromatography, Gas
Colony Count, Microbial
Conservation of Natural Resources
Finland
Fungi - isolation & purification
Gram-Negative Bacteria - isolation & purification
Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections - etiology - prevention & control
Humans
Male
Mycoses - etiology - prevention & control
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - microbiology - prevention & control
Occupational Exposure
Organic Chemicals - adverse effects - analysis
Refuse Disposal
Statistics, nonparametric
Volatilization
Abstract
Occupational exposure of workers to airborne microorganisms and volatile organic compounds (VOC) in different types of waste treatment situations was examined during summer time. Microorganisms were collected as stationary samples using a six-stage Andersen impactor, while for VOCs both personal and stationary sampling was conducted. The exposure at the waste handling facility was considerably greater than at landfill sites or in waste collection. The concentrations of viable fungi were maximally 10(5) cfu/m3, and the concentrations of both total culturable bacteria and Gram-negative bacteria exceeded the proposed occupational exposure limit values (OELV), being 10(4) and 10(3) cfu/m3, respectively. Exposure to VOCs in the waste handling facility was three times higher than at the landfill sites, being at highest 3000 microg/m3, considered to be the limit for discomfort. The use of personal protective equipment at work, thorough hand washing and changing clothes after the work shift are strongly recommended in the waste handling facility and the landfill sites.
PubMed ID
10384214 View in PubMed
Less detail

Occupational exposure to ethylenebisdithiocarbamates in agriculture and allergy: results from the EUROPIT field study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153967
Source
Hum Exp Toxicol. 2008 Sep;27(9):715-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Gmh Swaen
Lgpm van Amelsvoort
D. Boers
E. Corsini
S. Fustinoni
T. Vergieva
C. Bosetti
S. Pennanen
J. Liesivuori
C. Colosio
H. van Loveren
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
Source
Hum Exp Toxicol. 2008 Sep;27(9):715-20
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bulgaria
Ethylenebis(dithiocarbamates) - poisoning
Ethylenethiourea - analysis
Female
Finland
Humans
Hypersensitivity - etiology - immunology - urine
Immune System - drug effects - immunology - physiopathology
Italy
Male
Netherlands
Occupational Diseases - etiology - immunology - urine
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Risk Assessment - methods
Time Factors
Abstract
This epidemiological study was carried out to evaluate the possible association between occupational exposure to ethylenebisdithiocarbamates (EDBC) and allergy. The study was conducted in four countries in the European Union: The Netherlands, Finland, Italy and Bulgaria. A total of 248 workers exposed to EDBC and 231 non-occupationally exposed subjects entered the study. Exposure to EDBC was measured as urinary ethylenethiourea (ETU) in urinary samples collected at baseline and after 30 days of exposure. Several effect parameters were evaluated including questionnaire data on allergy, Phadiatop, a general allergy test, and specific IgE parameters. These data were also collected at baseline and after 30 days of exposure. Cross-sectional as well as longitudinal comparisons were made, adjusted for potential confounding factors. No association was found between exposure status, EDBC levels and allergic contact dermatitis, allergic rhinitis, food allergy or atopy as measured by the Phadiatop. The prevalence of skin irritation was elevated in the Dutch field study only and is more likely a result of plant contact rather than EDBC exposure. Occupational exposure to sunlight was noted to have a protective effect on atopy in terms of IgE positivity. We conclude that the EDBC exposure levels experienced in our field study are not associated with increased prevalence of allergic symptoms or allergy.
PubMed ID
19042954 View in PubMed
Less detail

Toxicological evaluation of the immune function of pesticide workers, a European wide assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153969
Source
Hum Exp Toxicol. 2008 Sep;27(9):701-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
P. Steerenberg
L. van Amelsvoort
C. Colosio
E. Corsini
S. Fustinoni
T. Vergieva
C. Zaikov
S. Pennanen
J. Liesivuori
H. Van Loveren
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The Netherlands.
Source
Hum Exp Toxicol. 2008 Sep;27(9):701-7
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Agriculture
Blood Cell Count
Bulgaria
Creatinine - urine
Ethylenebis(dithiocarbamates) - poisoning - urine
Ethylenethiourea - analysis
Finland
Humans
Immune System - drug effects - physiopathology
Immunity - drug effects
Italy
Netherlands
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Pesticides - poisoning
Risk Assessment - methods
Abstract
In this study, the prolonged low-dose exposure of mixtures of pesticides has been examined on hematological parameters and components of the immune defense in occupationally exposed humans. This investigation was carried out in five field studies in: the Netherlands (flower bulb growers, mainly re-entry workers), Italy (vineyard workers), Finland (potato farmers), and Bulgaria (workers from a zineb factory and greenhouse workers). Immunotoxicity was studied by measuring hematological parameters, complement, immunoglobulins, lymphocyte subpopulations, natural killer cells, autoimmunity, and antibody responses to hepatitis B vaccination. The total study population consisted of 248 pesticide-exposed and 231 non-occupationally exposed workers. As a surrogate measure of pesticide exposure the urinary excretion of ethylenethiourea (ETU), the main metabolite ethylenebisdithiocarbamates was measured. A significantly higher level of ETU in occupationally exposed subjects compared with controls (2.7 +/- 8.1 microg/g vs 0.5 +/- 3.7 microg/g creatinine) was found. Statistically significant differences, albeit very low, were found for complement C3 and C4 and the immunoglobulin classes IgG4 and IgA. For complement and IgG4, the levels were slightly increased and the level of IgA was decreased. In the lymphocyte populations, the CD8 subpopulation was increased. No effects were found on autoimmune antibodies and antibody response to hepatitis vaccination. In conclusion, pesticide exposure under various work place conditions in Europe was associated only with some subtle effects on the immune system, which may suggest that occupational exposure to pesticides does not influence the immunologic system in a clinically significant fashion, and does not pose a significant health risk to the exposed subjects.
PubMed ID
19042952 View in PubMed
Less detail

9 records – page 1 of 1.