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6 records – page 1 of 1.

An adaptation of the Miller patient classification system for the postanesthesia care unit at Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228606
Source
J Post Anesth Nurs. 1990 Aug;5(4):239-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1990
Author
J. Kay
D. Alcock
J. Lawrence
M. Goodman
Source
J Post Anesth Nurs. 1990 Aug;5(4):239-46
Date
Aug-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Nursing Care
Ontario
Patients - classification
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling
Recovery Room - manpower
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
Using the Miller Patient Classification framework, a descriptive three-phase study was carried out in order to develop a classification system specifically for the PACU of the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario. This study contributes further understanding of the complexities of developing a reliable classification system for the pediatric PACU.
PubMed ID
2388168 View in PubMed
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Creating a population-based linked health database: a new resource for health services research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204605
Source
Can J Public Health. 1998 Jul-Aug;89(4):270-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
R. Chamberlayne
B. Green
M L Barer
C. Hertzman
W J Lawrence
S B Sheps
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Services and Policy Research, University of British Columbia, Vancouver.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1998 Jul-Aug;89(4):270-3
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Confidentiality
Ethics, Medical
Humans
Management Information Systems
Medical Record Linkage
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - organization & administration
Abstract
As the availability of both health utilization and outcome information becomes increasingly important to health care researchers and policy makers, the ability to link person-specific health data becomes a critical objective. The integration of population-based administrative health databases has been realized in British Columbia by constructing an historical file of all persons registered with the health care system, and by probabilistically linking various program files to this 'coordinating' file. The linkages have achieved a high rate of success in matching service events to person-specific registration records. This success has allowed research projects to be proposed which would otherwise not have been feasible, and has initiated the development of policies and procedures regarding research access to linked data. These policies and procedures include a framework for addressing the ethical issues surrounding data linkage. With continued attention to confidentiality issues, these linked data present a valuable resource for health services research and planning.
PubMed ID
9735524 View in PubMed
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Source
Pediatr Nurs. 1999 Mar-Apr;25(2):221-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
E. Ahmann
J. Lawrence
Author Affiliation
Department for Family Support Services, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD 21213, USA.
Source
Pediatr Nurs. 1999 Mar-Apr;25(2):221-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Child
Communication
Family - psychology
Humans
Negativism
Nursing Staff - psychology
Pediatric Nursing - methods
Prejudice
Professional-Family Relations
Semantics
Abstract
When we work with families in health care settings, it is important to be aware of the way we communicate. Often overlooked is how the language we use to describe and understand families affects how we work with them. The language we use in thinking about a family can shape our perceptions of the family and may affect how we approach working with them. The language we use in describing a family to another health care provider can affect how that person will perceive and approach the family. The language families hear us use can affect families' perceptions of themselves, their perceptions of us, and, consequently, how they relate to us. In Project Copernicus' Family Centered Communication Skills: Facilitator's Guide (Edelman, Greenland, & Mills, 1993), an activity entitled "Watch Our Language" explores commonly used negative terminology about families and guidelines for better language. This exercise has been used with groups of nurses and other health care providers at several conferences and has generated thoughtful brainstorming about negative language related to families, its impact on families, and its impact on the nurses working with them. Those participating in the workshops explored better terminology about families and brainstormed a list of selected family strengths which are shared here.
PubMed ID
10532021 View in PubMed
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Good laboratory practice and laboratory accreditation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219806
Source
Qual Assur. 1993 Dec;2(4):332-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1993
Author
J. Lawrence
N. McQuaker
Author Affiliation
National Water Research Institute, Environment Canada, Burlington, Ontario.
Source
Qual Assur. 1993 Dec;2(4):332-8
Date
Dec-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Canada
Environmental Monitoring - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Facility Regulation and Control - economics - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Humans
International Cooperation
Laboratories - standards
United States
Abstract
Principles of good laboratory practice (GLP) and laboratory accreditation programs, particularly as they pertain to the environmental sector, are reviewed. The multitude of programs is proving costly for many laboratories and there is mounting pressure to develop reciprocity agreements between programs and to consolidate nationally and internationally. Inclusion of GLP and laboratory accreditation requirements in government regulations is resulting in a significantly increased number of laboratories participating in these programs.
PubMed ID
7952967 View in PubMed
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INFECTIOUS DISEASE AND TOXICOLOGICAL MONITORING OF STRANDED PACIFIC HARBOR SEALS (PHOCA VITULINA RICHARDSI) IN COOK INLET AS SURROGATES FOR MONITORING ENDANGERED BELUGAS (DELPHINAPTERUS LEUCAS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279087
Source
J Zoo Wildl Med. 2016 Sep;47(3):770-780
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Kendra L Bauer
Caroline E C Goertz
Jane A Belovarac
Robert W Walton
J Lawrence Dunn
Pamela Tuomi
Source
J Zoo Wildl Med. 2016 Sep;47(3):770-780
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Animals
Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - veterinary
Beluga Whale
Environmental monitoring
Female
Male
Parasitic Diseases, Animal - epidemiology
Phoca
Virus Diseases - epidemiology - veterinary
Water Pollutants, Chemical - blood
Abstract
Pacific harbor seals ( Phoca vitulina richardsi) and belugas ( Delphinapterus leucas ) eat many of the same prey species, occupy the same geographic area, and demonstrate site fidelity in Cook Inlet, Alaska. Although most direct research involving the critically endangered belugas is currently prohibited, studying harbor seals may provide important information about this beluga population. In recent years, harbor seal populations in Alaska have declined for unknown reasons. As part of its stranding program, the Alaska SeaLife Center (ASLC) managed 59 cases of live and dead stranded harbor seals from Cook Inlet between 1997 and 2011. Animals were screened for a variety of diseases and contaminants of concern. Animals were negative by serology to the following diseases: avian influenza, canine distemper virus, dolphin morbillivirus, porpoise morbillivirus, Leptospira canicola, L. grippotyphosa, L. pomona, Neospora caninum , Sarcocystis neurona , and Toxoplasma gondii . Positive titers were found against Brucella spp., phocine distemper virus, seal herpesvirus-1, L. bratislava, L. hardjo, and L. icterohemorrhagiae. All titers were stable or declining except in one animal with an increasing titer for seal herpesvirus-1. Fecal pathogen screenings identified normal flora as well as stable or declining low levels of potentially pathogenic and opportunistic bacteria, though most were of little concern for seal health. In most animals, toxicology screening showed that the majority of tested contaminants were below detectable limits. The level of evidence of exposure to pathogens of concern was low in harbor seals. Although the infectious disease burden and contaminant levels in belugas in Cook Inlet cannot be definitively determined without direct testing, pathogen and contaminant exposure is expected to be similar to that found in harbor seals in this region, as the harbor seals and belugas share the habitat and food resources.
PubMed ID
27691941 View in PubMed
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Sowing the seeds of skepticism: Russian state news and anti-GMO sentiment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296632
Source
GM Crops Food. 2018; 9(2):53-58
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2018
Author
Shawn F Dorius
Carolyn J Lawrence-Dill
Author Affiliation
a Department of Sociology , Iowa State University , Ames , IA , USA.
Source
GM Crops Food. 2018; 9(2):53-58
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Organisms, Genetically Modified - metabolism
Russia
Social Media
Abstract
Biotech news coverage in English-language Russian media fits the profile of the Russian information warfare strategy described in recent military reports. This raises the question of whether Russia views the dissemination of anti-GMO information as just one of many divisive issues it can exploit as part of its information war, or if GMOs serve more expansive disruptive purposes. Distinctive patterns in Russian news provide evidence of a coordinated information campaign that could turn public opinion against genetic engineering. The recent branding of Russian agriculture as the ecologically clean alternative to genetically engineered foods is suggestive of an economic motive behind the information campaign against western biotechnologies.
PubMed ID
29561212 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.